USA: PNS to Start Energy Efficient Upgrades

first_img View post tag: PNS January 7, 2013 View post tag: Naval View post tag: start View post tag: to Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Mid-Atlantic awarded a contract Dec. 28 for energy improvements and repairs to the historic Building 92 structural shops at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine.The $13.8 million project is projected to reduce the building’s annual energy consumption by 82 percent through the use of renewable energy, efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning and electrical systems, and smart metering technology.“In an industrial facility such as Building 92 structural shops, and in a climate such as Maine, the primary energy driver is building heat,” said Lee Enzastiga, NAVFAC Mid-Atlantic project manager for the Northeast Integrated Products Team. “An energy recovery system will be installed to recover heat being exhausted from the industrial process exhaust and transfer that heat to the incoming air to the building.”A new, large polycarbonate window system will replace a deteriorating window wall and also help reduce energy costs while still preserving the historic character of the building’s exterior walls which cover nearly 30,000 square feet of this submarine fabrication and repair facility.“The new window system will be a translucent curtain wall system that resembles the historic configuration of the existing window system but increases the R-value and prevents air infiltration,” Enzastiga said. The higher the R-value, or the thermal resistance of a material, the better the material is at insulating, he added.Large exterior overhead doors will be replaced or refurbished and large fans will be installed in middle and high bays to draw down the large amount of heat trapped at the high ceiling so it can be used to heat other areas in the building.The project also incorporates several renewable energy technologies such as a solar wall that will preheat air by solar radiation, fans that will feed the preheated air into the building, and hot water coils that will supplement the solar heat. The building’s automated heating system will manage the operation of the fans so they only run when it is efficient to do so.Lastly, a new lighting management system will adjust interior lighting accordingly to maximize natural daylight use from the new window wall.The competitively procured contract was awarded to ECC of Marlborough, Mass. Work will be performed in Kittery, Maine and is expected to be completed by October 2014.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, January 7, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: PNS to Start Energy Efficient Upgrades View post tag: energy Industry news View post tag: Defence View post tag: efficient View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Upgrades View post tag: Defense USA: PNS to Start Energy Efficient Upgrades Share this articlelast_img read more

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GALLERY: Royal New Zealand Navy celebrates 75th anniversary

first_img February 8, 2016 Back to overview,Home naval-today GALLERY: Royal New Zealand Navy celebrates 75th anniversary Authorities View post tag: HMNZS Wellington View post tag: HMNZS TE MANA View post tag: HMNZS Hawea View post tag: HMNZS Canterbury GALLERY: Royal New Zealand Navy celebrates 75th anniversary As part of the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) 75th Anniversary celebrations, a formation entry into Auckland’s Waitemata Harbour was held Monday, February 8.The formation entry included a 17-gun salute from HMNZS Canterbury as she passed Devonport Naval Base at midday, and this was reciprocated with an 11-gun salute fired from HMNZS Te Mana, berthed at Devonport Naval Base.New Zealanders were able to watch the ceremony from ashore, from North Head and other vantage points around the Auckland’s harbour.Maritime Museum heritage vessels, the scow Ted Ashby and the steam vessel Breeze, also accompanied the RNZN ships.The salute is a naval tradition in which the Maritime Component Commander of the RNZN is formally acknowledging the newly appointed Chief of Navy, Rear Admiral John Martin ONZM.Following the formation entry this afternoon, the ships engaged in manoeuvers, including a boarding party deployment from HMNZS Wellington via RHIBs to HMNZS Hawea and a winching demonstration using 6 Squadron’s Seasprite SH-2G helicopters to conduct a transfer between ships.[mappress mapid=”17682″]Images: Royal New Zealand Navy View post tag: Royal New Zealand Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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“The MoMo Challenge” Encouraging Violence in Kids; Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation Issues Warning

first_imgSearching “The Momo challenge” online, and you’re bound to come across an unpleasant image, or video.Apps like What’s App, Facebook, and YouTube have all reportedly been linked to showing children the figure “MoMo” which is actually derived from a Japanese sculpture.EVSC issued a warning to parents, but some children have already seen The MoMo.“It was on my uncle’s phone and it was talking. But it was just the video talking,” says Amani Barksdale.“I actually just read about it,” says parent Alicia Piper.Any age group can be affected by social media challenges, but experts say some people are more susceptible.“If you have low self-esteem then your desire to seek approval via social media is probably stronger the motivation to do things in order to get approval from your peers or other individuals via this kind of a medium,” says University of Evansville Psychology Professor Vincent Campese.Experts say The MoMo challenge is rooted in fear.“Because it is something that so many people are afraid of happening to their child it has a much stronger grip on people, and a much quicker infiltration into society,” says Campese.“It’s just a statue,” says Barksdale.When asked if she knows if The MoMo is fake she says, “Yes I already know that because it doesn’t even walk.”Joining younger children on social media is recommended.“Maybe download it yourself, ” says Campese.“Watch the video, and instead of streaming it via YouTube stream it off your local drives so you know the content is what you saw.”Some parents are using social media apps to monitor the content their child is viewing online.“I found an app called, “Bark,” says Piper.“It monitors all of my children’s social media accounts, and it uses trigger words for depression anxiety, nudity, curse words, and then it’ll send me a warning that I need to check those accounts out.”I reached out to YouTube and the company issued a statement saying, “Our community guidelines prohibit harmful and dangerous challenges including promoting The MoMo Challenge, and we remove this content quickly when flagged to us.”If a child or parents come across The MoMo they should flag the content on whatever app they’re using.Experts also suggest rooting children in real-world activities as opposed to seeking validation online.CommentsFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare FEBRUARY 28TH, 2019 AMANDA PORTER INDIANATonight the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation issued a warning to parents about “The MoMo challenge.” The challenge is reportedly negatively affecting some children and it’s gaining attention and concern from parents.last_img read more

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The “Phish Song Cognition Theory” Explains What Types Of Phish We Like & Why

first_imgRecently, writers Andy P. Smith and Jason Gershuny released a brand-new book on the beloved jam act, Phish. Titled 100 Things Phish Fan Should Know & Do Before They Die, the book spans Phistory from the band’s earliest days until today, offering 100 concise chapters ranging from the band’s history to notable performances, albums, and sit-ins to the band’s and fan’s culture and intertwining symbiotic relationship.Below you can read an excerpted essay from 100 Things Phish Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die, which talks about the “Phish Song Cognition Theory”—a concept Smith and Gershuny introduce that explains how and why people view this prolific group so differently. Check it out for yourself below, and head here to pick up a copy of the book.64. The Phish Song Cognition TheoryIn Ed Levine’s 2010 book Pizza: A Slice of Heaven, he interviewed Sam Sifton, the New York Times food editor. Sifton describes what he calls the “Pizza Cognition Theory.”Sifton says, “There is a theory of cognitive development that says children learn to identify things only in opposition to other things. Only the child who has learned what is not brown, the theory holds, can discern what is ‘brown.’”“Pizza naturally throws this theory into a tailspin. The first slice of pizza a child sees and tastes (and somehow appreciates on something more than a childlike, mmm goood, thanks-mom level), becomes, for him, pizza. He relegates all subsequent slices, if they are different in some manner from that first triangle of dough and cheese and tomato and oil and herbs and spices, to a status that we can characterize as not pizza.”In short, your first encounter with something defines how you identify with that thing in your heart and mind.“The first slice of pizza a child sees and tastes…becomes, for him, pizza. You cannot teach a child what pizza is, this explanation of pizza cognition asserts, by providing him with oppositional ingredients or styles. The love of pizza simply doesn’t work that way. Invariably, if a child’s first slice of pizza comes from a deep-dish Chicago pie or is a slick, chewy pillow of Sicilian or half-hour-guaranteed-delivery cardboard Frisbee or a frozen French-bread travesty, semolina-dusted ‘Creole’ or sweet pineapple and plastic ham ‘Hawaiian’ pie, then, well, that is pizza to him. He will defend this interpretation to the end of his life.”I would like to propose a theory for Phish based on Sifton’s claim. While the first slice of pizza a child enjoys defines all other slices, the same can be said for Phish fans and their favorite songs or type of songs. We can all agree that one’s first Phish show is a special experience. No matter how many albums or live shows you may have heard, there is nothing that compares to that first live show. In many ways, you cannot teach someone what Phish is. (At best, we can only suggest 100 Things.) And like Sifton’s pizza theory, I would propose that if someone’s first Phish show is deep, dark, and funky, well, that’s what Phish is to them. If that first show is loose, ambient, and spacey, that’s their Phish.Or perhaps this is best understood with regard to the 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 eras. For those touring in the late 1990s, Phish may only be “cow-funk” Phish, and all other Phish is simply subpar. Whereas someone catching a bunch of 2.0 shows, well, Phish for them may be “Seven Below” and “Walls of the Cave.” Our younger fans may absolutely yearn for “Fuego,” while older fans will scoff it off. These youngsters are just victims to the Phish Cognition Theory: that first Phish will always be your true Phish.Personally, if I had to choose just one favorite Phish song it would be “The Squirming Coil” from 1990’s Lawn Boy. Now, I hadn’t discovered the band until some years later and still wouldn’t see Phish live until 1998. So this doesn’t quite seem to prove my theory. Or does it?Looking back at my first show, my first live Phish experience at The Gorge in 1998 (July 16, 1998), I was pleasantly surprised to discover that Phish had indeed opened with “The Squirming Coil.” While I had no strong memory of this, it has clearly left an indelible mark on my psyche, and I still get chills every time I hear the band play “Coil.” And for those of you thinking, They opened with Coil? I hear ya.Yes, traditionally the song closes a set or fills the encore slot. In fact, according to Phish.net, of the 351 times Phish has performed “The Squirming Coil,” they have only opened a show with the song four times: twice in 1990, once in 1997, and once at The Gorge on that beautiful summer evening in June of 1998.And it just so happens that “Coil” is not only my favorite Phish song, but also the very first Phish song I had heard performed live. Now, who wants a slice of pizza?last_img read more

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Harvard College Library Wintersession looks forward, to the past

first_imgIn a 2007 excavation of Harvard Yard, archaeology students unearthed a handful of metal fragments, each imprinted with a letter. The pieces, which were determined to be 17th-century movable type, root the history of printing at the feet of current students and gave context for Houghton Library’s letterpress printing workshop during this year’s Wintersession.Across campus, faculty and staff explored editorial production on the other end of the technological spectrum. “Multimedia Exposed,” a series of symposiums led by the Expanding the Boundaries of Authorship group, Lamont Library’s Multimedia Lab, and other campus organizations, investigated emerging tools for authoring with digital media.The events punctuated 10 days of lectures, hands-on presentations, and panels hosted throughout the Harvard College Library and FAS Libraries as part of this year’s January term. The sessions are built to enrich learning in a relaxed setting removed from the demanding pace of the semester schedule.last_img read more

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Unhidden figures

first_imgIf there’s one thing LaNell Williams wants women of color interested in studying physics at top institutions to know, it’s this: You can do this.Williams is a Ph.D. student in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences working in the lab of Wagner Family Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Physics Vinothan Manoharan, and just the third African American woman to pursue a doctorate in physics at Harvard. When she graduates she will join a cohort of fewer than 100 African American women who have received doctorates in the field since 1973.“When I tried to apply to Harvard, despite everything I had — a 3.93 GPA and a National Science Foundation fellowship — I was told I was reaching too high. And if you asked any black woman in this field, especially those of us who are at places like Harvard, they’ll tell you similar stories,” Williams said. “The biggest thing Harvard and places like it miss when it comes to recruiting is that they’re not encouraging those of us who are qualified, those of us who are ready, those of us who are able, to come to these places.”To help change the situation, Williams co-founded the Women+ of Color Project as a student at Wesleyan University to support women of color in STEM fields. The group ran a three-day workshop at Harvard recently for 20 African American, Latinx, and Native American women interested in pursuing a career in physics, astronomy, and related fields. Attendees were selected from a pool of candidates who had applied or been nominated, and the goal of the event was to help them access the resources they need to apply to and succeed in graduate school.“I’m bringing these students here now, because I want to tell them, ‘You are good enough,’” she said. “They have the grades; they have the scores; they have the pedigree. What’s keeping them from applying — and this is what I’m focused on — is the conversations and the resources.”In her keynote speech, Nia Imara, a John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, urged the women to bring their unique perspectives to the fields they study.,“I don’t love the fact that women and minorities are underrepresented in science, because I know we have knowledge to contribute just like everyone else,” said Imara, who studies how stars are born in the Milky Way and other galaxies. “When I go to a conference and I look out in the audience, I can’t help but notice who is missing, and I can’t help but think this is a loss for the scientific community.“Most of you are forging a new path, and that takes courage,” she continued. “I know it hasn’t been easy. As a female student and a female student of color, you have had to face obstacles others haven’t. You may have been discouraged or excluded, and I know that often you’ve never been properly acknowledged or apologized to. But not in spite of, but because of your experiences, you have a unique way of seeing the world. You have a unique set of qualities that will make you an asset whether you decide to go to grad school or otherwise.”As part of a session designed to walk students through the process of applying to graduate school, Director of Graduate Studies for FAS Science and Co-Director of Graduate Studies for Physics Jacob Barandes shared tips on what admissions committees look for in students.,“If you’re here, it’s probably because you love learning,” he said. “So apply. Please don’t count yourself out. You may have heard from people that you’re not strong enough. Forget about that. You are much stronger than you think you are, so please apply, and let the admission committees decide.”Other workshop events included deep dives into how to write a graduate school essay, feedback from Harvard physics faculty and postdocs, lab tours, information on fee waivers, and helping students work on their applications to Harvard. The workshop was generously funded by the Heising Simons Foundation.The students also had the chance to attend events with faculty and get to know other women in the program during dinner and a movie.For students like Tracy Edwards, who came to the workshop from Hampton University in Virginia, the realization that she was part of a community of like-minded women who wanted to study physics was invaluable.“It’s like a drink of water,” she said of seeing the other women attending the conference. “When you’re really parched, you’re in a desert and have no water and are just desperate. And I come here and I can say, ‘You look like me. You have the same experience as me.’ It’s like a drink of water.”,Like many of the students who attended the workshop, Edwards had repeatedly been told she didn’t belong.“I saw an ad for this program on Facebook. It was 10 p.m., and I’d spent eight hours working on the application,” she said. “I thought there was no way I would get invited, but I just needed something to hope for, because I felt like no matter what I did I wasn’t going to get anywhere.”That belief, she said, stemmed from a long history of dispiriting conversations with faculty that “destroyed” her confidence.“This past summer, I took a math class, and the professor told me that the only reason I would get into grad school was because I’m black — that I was just a racial quota,” she said. “After one test that I didn’t do very well on, I emailed him to ask what I could do to improve, and he emailed me back and said, ‘You’re not worth my time.’ And that hurts, having a teacher who is supposed to help you and teach you and guide you say you’re not worth their time. What do you say to that?” “When you’re really parched, you’re in a desert and have no water and are just desperate. And I come here and I can say, ‘You look like me. You have the same experience as me.’ It’s like a drink of water.” — Tracy Edwards, Hampton University Related Percentages of women and minorities who are tenured and tenure-track reach record highs Learning to talk about race in the workplace Faculty diversity continues to grow For many of the other women attending the conference, stories like Edwards’ are maddeningly familiar.“The level of discrimination I felt in my first year of physics was horrible,” said Sideena Grace, a junior at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn. “I was working three jobs, so I did terrible in my physics class, and one of my professors told me last week that they expect me to have the lowest grade in the class because I struggled in [it].“I just broke down because I’m just tired of explaining myself,” she continued. “The expectation for me is lower, so now I have to work three times harder to prove them wrong.”And though last week’s conference is a critical step forward in encouraging women of color to follow their passion for physics and apply to programs like Harvard’s, Edwards emphasized institutional change is also necessary.“As a minority woman, it’s not my job to correct your bad behavior,” she said. “Yes, it’s great for us to be here and break the mold or break the pattern, but it’s also the job of professors and people who are in admissions to acknowledge their own biases and fix them. I shouldn’t be expected to.” Author Allison Manswell examines importance of open dialogue An update on Harvard’s diversity, inclusion efforts In Q&A session, John Wilson says mission of ‘inclusive excellence’ is underway last_img read more

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Ag & Outdoor Expo

first_imgThe Georgia Urban Ag and Outdoor Expo seeks to educate the public on the roles that urban and traditional farming play in supplying food to a continually growing nation. To that end, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension poultry scientist Claudia Dunkley and UGA Extension agent Steve Pettis will be among the host of presenters at the event.The expo is set for Friday and Saturday, May 20-21, from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m., at the Gwinnett County Fairgrounds in Lawrenceville, Georgia. At UGA, Dunkley works closely with the poultry industry and has given workshops and symposia for UGA Extension agents and poultry producers since 2007. With poultry producers, she conducts applied research on greenhouse gas emissions, the industry’s carbon footprint, litter management, dead bird disposal and molting commercial layer flocks. She will present a seminar on laying hens on Friday, May 20, and a session on backyard poultry biosecurity on Saturday, May 21. A former Gwinnett County Extension agent, Pettis earned a bachelor’s degree in ornamental horticulture and a master’s degree in plant protection and pest management at UGA while working with highly esteemed horticulturists Allan Armitage and Mike Dirr. He is currently the UGA Extension agent in Rockdale County.Pettis will lead pesticide applicator training on Friday, May 20. The Upper Ocmulgee River Resource Conservation and Development Council will host the event in collaboration with UGA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Georgia Department of Agriculture, Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Georgia Forestry Commission, Georgia Organics, Global Growers, Athens Land Trust, Gwinnett Technical College and Georgia Grown.Tickets for the expo cost $5 for one day or $8 for both days. To register, visit gaurbanexpo.com.last_img read more

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4-H Week

first_imgGeorgia 4-H inspires kids to do — to do community service, go to new places and to learn new skills. Georgians across the state are celebrating everything 4-H’ers do during National 4-H Week on Oct. 7-13. What started as a club for farm kids has grown into the nation’s largest youth leadership organization — a place where school-aged children learn to become successful and confident adults.Georgia is home to one of the largest state programs in the country, with about 170,000 active 4-H members. Georgia 4-H began in 1904 when Newton County school superintendent, G.C. Adams organized a corn club for boys. Today, Georgia 4-H attracts students from all areas of the state, not just those who live on farms. Only 3.1 percent of Georgia 4-H members now live on a farm.Active 4-H members become successful adults, like Grammy-award winning singer and songwriter Jennifer Nettles of Coffee County, Georgia. She says Georgia 4-H gave her a platform to share her voice and her passion.Award-winning country singer Trisha Yearwood, a native of Jasper County, Georgia, credits 4-H for teaching her that her talents would take her far, but her heart would make her a star.TV and radio host and legal commentator Nancy Grace, a native of Bibb County, Georgia, says 4-H taught her that leaders follow their dreams, but working hard makes dreams a reality.Georgia 4-H is available to children in all of Georgia’s 159 counties.The four ‘H’s stand for head, heart, hands and health and are represented by the four-leaf clover. Participating youths develop life skills through hands-on projects involving volunteer work, health, science, engineering, technology, leadership, agriculture and communication.Georgia 4-H programs, under the umbrella of UGA Extension, are based on research from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and other UGA colleges. Georgia 4-H agents supplement teachers’ efforts by creating materials based on after-school lessons and in-school curricula designed to meet Georgia Performance Standards.“The idea of bringing UGA research and resources to Georgia students through the use of county agents throughout the state was a cutting-edge idea in 1904 and remains so even today,” said Arch Smith, state 4-H leader. “The most important work of 4-H is to help young people become better citizens and enable them to grow into responsible, active adults.”Georgia 4-H youth perform community service, conduct research, compile portfolios of their accomplishments and learn public speaking skills through oral presentations at 4-H Project Achievement. During the 2016-17 school year, 43,067 Georgia 4-H members participated in Project Achievement on the local level.Georgia 4-H members also learn responsibility through livestock projects, programs and judging. Georgia 4-H partners with Georgia FFA and the UGA Department of Animal and Dairy Science to provide these programs. Every year, close to 2,500 students complete a year-long process to prepare more than 4,500 animals for exhibition at the Georgia Junior National Livestock Show and other competitions.To learn more about Georgia 4-H, go to georgia4h.org. To find out more about Georgia 4-H in your county, contact your local UGA Extension office at 1800-ASK-UGA1 or visit extension.uga.edu.last_img read more

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GAO urges HHS to speed antiviral, prepandemic vaccine plans

first_img Sep 30 GAO report In June HHS released draft guidance on the use of antivirals during an influenza pandemic. The agency’s goal is to place 75 million treatment courses in the Strategic National Stockpile, and draft guidance proposes that the private sector stockpile 110 million additional treatment courses. Investigators also said a public comment period after the draft prepandemic vaccine allocation plan is announced is a useful step. “Public participation is an essential component for acceptance of tough decisions that will be required unless and until greater capacity or a universal vaccine can be developed,” the report said. The 72-page report, focusing on the US Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) pandemic response plans, was published on the GAO’s Web site on Sep 30. See also: Oct 6, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – In a recent progress report to Congress on federal influenza pandemic response planning, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) recognized a host of obstacles but cited two areas that officials could make headway on: finalizing guidance on allocating antivirals and developing guidance on how to prioritize groups to receive prepandemic vaccine in the early stages of a pandemic. The proposed guidance, developed by an interagency task force, advised that antivirals in government stockpiles be used to treat people who are ill, especially when supplies are scarce, and that antivirals for preventive use be mainly drawn from private stockpiles. The draft document did not attempt to prioritize groups. “We believe that finalizing guidance on the use of pharmaceutical interventions will be crucial for responding to a pandemic outbreak and that the necessary guidance documents should be finalized as soon as possible,” the GAO wrote. Bill Hall, an HHS spokesman in Washington, DC, told CIDRAP News that the agency has been working on the draft allocation plan, but that it isn’t finished and the agency can’t yet say when it will be. In a letter responding to the GAO report, Vincent Ventimiglia, Jr, assistant secretary for legislation at HHS, wrote that the agency is in the process of updating the proposed guidance on antiviral use during a pandemic, on the basis of feedback it received during the public comment period. The comment period was set to end on Jul 3, according to a May 23 Federal Register notice. Investigators looked at three response components that the GAO and outside experts have said need improvements—pharmaceutical intervention, healthcare surge capacity, and public communications. Though the GAO gave detailed status reports for all three of the areas, it made recommendations only about pharmaceutical interventions. The GAO said establishing target groups in advance is a key component of pandemic planning and warned that HHS could encounter problems if it doesn’t issue graft guidance for prepandemic vaccines in a more timely manner. “This lack of essential information could slow the initial response at the state and local levels and complicate the general public’s understanding of the necessity for rationing these interventions,” the GAO wrote. Jun 3 CIDRAP News story “HHS offers pandemic guidance on masks, antivirals” In his response accompanying the GAO report, Ventimiglia wrote that HHS will release its proposed prepandemic vaccine allocation guidance “in the near future.” As for prepandemic vaccine stockpiles, the GAO report says HHS will oversee the distribution and administration to workers who are needed to keep society functioning until a pandemic vaccine becomes widely available. According to the report, the National Infrastructure Advisory Council has estimated that the critical workforce numbers about 20 million people, and HHS’ goal is to stockpile enough to cover that number. However, HHS has not yet released draft guidance on prioritizing target groups for prepandemic vaccines. HHS officials told GAO investigators that target groups for the prepandemic vaccine would likely resemble those for the pandemic vaccine, but would have more of a critical workforce focus. They also said that a tiered approach like that used for the pandemic vaccine would be needed only if a pandemic occurs before HHS reaches its goal of stockpiling enough for 20 million people. In its other recommendation, the GAO advised HHS to release guidance for using and prioritizing prepandemic vaccine designed to protect against a pandemic virus before a vaccine closely matched to the actual pandemic strain is available. Federal officials are already stockpiling a prepandemic vaccine based on the H5N1 virus. In June HHS released its official guidance on allocating pandemic vaccine, which would be developed after the start of a pandemic and designed to match the circulating strain. HHS officials project that it would take 20 to 23 weeks after the start of a pandemic to start producing the first doses. May 23 Federal Register noticelast_img read more

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