Research to lose sleep over

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.It’s not uncommon to hear of undergraduates pulling all-nighters to prepare for exams or finish papers. Even though a number of studies have shown that sleep deprivation is unhealthy and can actually be counterproductive, that does little to sway the average student when deadlines loom.So Will Clerx ’14 set out to dig deeper, specifically to study the physiological effects that irregular sleep patterns have on college students. Having served as an undergraduate researcher in the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, a Harvard affiliate, Clerx designed and ran an experiment involving 61 of his fellow students. His research helped provide insight into how irregular sleep patterns affect undergraduate performance. And his work is included in the documentary “The Great American Sleep Project,” which will air on the National Geographic network.“There are always competing priorities that arise, and college students don’t always make regular sleep their highest priority,” said Clerx. “But when you do the research, you see that irregular sleep patterns are associated with lower academic performance. So really, it appears to be counterproductive. It’s one of those things where people don’t necessarily realize what they’re doing to their bodies.”A molecular and cellular biology concentrator, Clerx said his interest in science began when he was a small child looking for insects in his Seekonk, Mass., backyard.“I was always fascinated by the natural world and exploring why things are the way they are. But while it’s something that has always interested me, I’ve found that it’s one thing to read about science, about biology, and another thing to ‘do science,’ ” said the Cabot House resident. “I’ve always been a passionate consumer of knowledge, as is everyone at Harvard; that’s how we got here, that’s why we’re graduating. But once you’re here at Harvard, you have a very special opportunity to become a creator of knowledge.”In addition to his work in the lab, Clerx was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa as a junior, and is a former Cabot House Committee member and a member of the Harvard Catholic Student Association. Those who know him say he is a natural leader.“Will brings intellect, passion, and humor to everything he does.  He takes on challenging questions that impact the quality of life on a societal level while also caring deeply for those around him. He has contributed to both Cabot House and the broader College community through his intellectual, social, and personal leadership in immeasurable ways.  He is truly a gem of a person,” Rakesh and Stephanie Khurana, co-masters of Cabot House, said in a joint statement. Rakesh Khurana is the incoming dean of Harvard College.Entering his freshman year, Clerx took courses that fueled his interest in biology, but he wasn’t sure where his focus should be within the field. In the summer after his first year, he participated in the international Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition, a program that engages students in synthetic-biology research by having them collaborate on a research project of their own design, with the aim of creating biological systems that perform new functions.Clerx called this a “formative experience,” but said it wasn’t quite what he was seeking.“I realized that this kind of research could have far-reaching and important impacts, but it was pretty far removed from the clinical side, from people. I took a step back and realized I really wanted to work more directly with people,” he said.That’s when he took a class taught by Charles Czeisler ’74, the Frank Baldino Jr., Ph.D. Professor of Sleep Medicine. Clerx learned about the circadian clock, the biomechanism that guides sleep patterns, and how environmental time cues such as light can alter that internal clock and affect sleep.“I was hooked,” he said. “Sleep is very tangible. It is something everyone experiences, everyone knows, and we think we understand it so well, but there is really so much more we can learn.”In the fall of 2012, Clerx began working in the sleep lab. He continued to learn about how lack or disruption of sleep over time can unsettle the body, affecting important hormones such as melatonin and cortisol and increasing the risk of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. And he saw how light exposure can influence the body’s internal clock. Yet he didn’t think that enough was being done to see how all of this was affecting undergraduates, whose exposure to light from smartphones and computer screens late into the evening has increased tremendously in the 21st century.For his experiment conducted in the fall semester, he recruited fellow Harvard undergraduates and compared students with regular sleep schedules to those with irregular sleep patterns. His work evolved into his senior thesis.“Will’s creativity and talent enabled him to make an important discovery linking irregular sleep-wake schedules with changes in the brain’s circadian clock. His thesis research was truly exemplary,” Czeisler said.“What I found was an effect similar to what some have called ‘social jet lag.’ Exposure to nocturnal light was associated with setting the circadian clock of the irregular sleepers back nearly three hours. This means that, on average, these students are in Boston, geographically speaking, but are essentially living in California, biologically speaking.” Clerx said. “I could tell college students they could sleep more. But if I could tell them that if they slept more regularly it might be the difference between a B+ and an A-, that has very tangible meaning.”After graduation, Clerx will continue to work in the sleep lab, but eventually plans to go to medical school to become a pediatric oncologist.“When you have children who are sick, young kids just at the beginning of their lives, there seems to be something fundamentally wrong with that. You’re fighting for the life ahead of them. There’s no doubt that it can be a tough environment when things don’t work out, but at the same time I think there’s a lot of room there to bring hope to people, and that’s what interests me,” he said.As for his own sleep patterns, does Clerx practice what his research teaches?“I am by no means a perfect human,” he said with a laugh, “but I am certainly aware of it. But there have been times when I stay up late writing a paper, look at the clock, and say to myself, ‘My risk of diabetes is going up.’ ”last_img read more

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Chorale to perform Handel’s ‘Messiah’

first_img“Messiah” is an oratorio that contains three movements, Bishop said. The Chorale will be singing most of the first two movements, for a performance that will be around two and a half hours. “It depends on how many solos we do,” she said. “We don’t do the entire piece, we kind of pick and choose.” This year’s performance is unique in that the Chorale will be accompanied by a Baroque orchestra, Bishop said. The orchestra is comprised of Notre Dame students and other musicians. “A lot of the people play with us for ‘Messiah‘ every year,” she said. “The string instruments have a different feel. We still sing with a harpsichord, but it’s really cool because it’s more historically accurate.”Director Alexander Blachly said in an email the Baroque instruments have a several advantages as accompaniment for works like “Messiah.”“Most notably, they make the phrases easier to play and easier to shape. Modern strings don’t let in enough lightness and air, and as a result the phrases tend to sound heavy and labored, even when played softly,” he said. “Certain effects, like sudden strong notes, also project better with Baroque instruments. The older instruments are not as loud as modern ones, and this has one advantage and one disadvantage: the advantage is that the sound is gentler, more voice-like.”The downside is that the Baroque instruments do not project as easily in a large hall, Blachly said, “and the players therefore have to take that into account and play with a little more projection than would be necessary on modern instruments.”“Perhaps the greatest advantage is that the Baroque instruments are pitched a half-step lower than modern instruments, with the result that the highest notes for the sopranos are easier to sing,” he said.‘Messiah’ is intended to retell the history of early Christianity, Blachly said, from the prophecies of Jesus’ birth, through the host of angels singing of his glory to the shepherds, then his Passion and suffering, and finally, the arrival of Christianity, with the anticipation of the Day of Judgment.“The Chorale sings virtually all of part one, the prophecies and birth, most of part two, Jesus’ Passion, and several numbers from part three, which looks forward to a future day in heaven when the souls will be united with Christ,” he said.  “The Chorale ends its performance with the final number of part two, the ‘Hallelujah’ chorus, which, with its trumpets, foretells the Day of Judgment.”Bishop said the piece is performed a lot at Easter time, as well, because parts of the second and third movements deal with the death of Jesus.“One of my favorite songs is a passage from the Bible that is commonly read at Christmas time, where angel comes down from heaven and there’s the shepherds watching over the flock and she announces the birth of Jesus,” Bishop said. “So there are a lot of those classic Christmas messages in it.”The Chorale has been rehearsing for the performances since November, she said. “Because we sing it every year, we normally learn it pretty fast,” she said. “The old members help carry the new members. … and it generally requires some outside time, especially for the new people.”Bishop said Chorale has a large number of new members this year. “It was really exciting to see them on Monday for the first time, get to hear us perform our choruses with the orchestra, and seeing it all start to come together,” she said. “This is my favorite thing we perform. I love it, I smile through the whole thing. I’m not normally a huge classical music person, but Handel’s ‘Messiah’ is something else.”Bishop said it has been “extra special” to sing ‘Messiah’ for the last time, especially as president of a group she loves.“I’ll probably tear up during my last ‘Hallelujah’ chorus,” Bishop said. “It’s a special group, full of my best friends. … We’re a really different group of people that are all brought together by our love of music, and I think that brings a lot of unique aspects to our group. … It’s one of those places where I always feel so comfortable, and welcomed and loved.”In addition to performing Handel’s “Messiah,” the official concert choir of the University has fall and spring concerts, Bishop said. On the last week of winter break, Chorale will tour the Midwest. “We’ll sing the ‘Hallelujah’ chorus at all our stops. I wish we got to sing more, but it’s not quite the same with just the piano. It’s when you add in the orchestra is when it really becomes something else.”Tags: chorale, DPAC, Messiah Courtesy of Mimi Michuda The Notre Dame Chorale performs Handel’s “Messiah” last year at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. The Notre Dame Chorale’s annual performance of Handel’s “Messiah” will take place at Leighton Hall in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center on Friday and Saturday evenings at 8 p.m. Tickets are $3 for students, $2 if they are bought from Chorale members.“One of the reasons I decided to try out for Chorale is because I saw we were singing Handel’s ‘Messiah.’ And I just love the ‘Hallelujah Chorus,’ and I’ve really fallen in love with all of ‘Messiah,’” senior and chorale president Erin Bishop said.last_img read more

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Green Mountain Coffee Roasters declares three-for-two stock split

first_imgGreen Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc (NASDAQ: GMCR) today announced that its Board of Directors has approved a three-for-two stock split to be effected in the form of a stock dividend. The Company will distribute one additional share of its common stock to all shareholders of record at the close of business on May 29, 2009 for every two shares of common stock held on that date. The shares will be distributed on June 8, 2009 by the Company’s transfer agent, Continental Stock Transfer so that the new shares issued will equal 1.5 times the pre-split number (rounded down as necessary) with fractional shares paid in cash. The Company’s common stock will begin trading on a split-adjusted basis on June 9, 2009 at the June 8th closing price divided by 1.5.“This stock dividend allows us to share our success with our loyal stockholders to the extent of our authorized stock and underscores our confidence in the strength of our Company and its prospects for the future,” said Larry Blanford, GMCR’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “We remain committed to building stockholder value by providing consumers with an extraordinary coffee experience while helping to make a positive difference in the world.”About Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.As a leader in the specialty coffee industry, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR) is recognized for its award-winning coffees, innovative brewing technology, and socially responsible business practices. GMCR’s operations are managed through two business units. The Specialty Coffee business unit produces coffee, tea and hot cocoa from its family of brands, including Tully’s Coffee®, Green Mountain Coffee® and Newman’s Own® Organics coffee. The Keurig business unit is a pioneer and leading manufacturer of gourmet single-cup brewing systems. K-Cup® portion packs for Keurig® Single-Cup Brewers are produced by a variety of licensed brands, including Green Mountain Coffee and Tully’s Coffee. GMCR supports local and global communities by offsetting 100% of its direct greenhouse gas emissions, investing in Fair Trade Certified™ coffee, and donating at least five percent of its pre-tax profits to social and environmental projects. Visit www.GreenMountainCoffee.com(link is external) and www.Keurig.com(link is external) for more information.Forward-Looking StatementsCertain statements contained herein are not based on historical fact and are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the applicable securities laws and regulations. Owing to the uncertainties inherent in forward-looking statements, actual results could differ materially from those stated here. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the impact on sales and profitability of consumer sentiment in this difficult economic environment, the Company’s success in efficiently expanding operations and capacity to meet growth, the Company’s success in efficiently and effectively integrating Tully’s wholesale operations and capacity into its Specialty Coffee business unit, the ability of our lenders to honor their commitments under our credit facility, competition and other business conditions in the coffee industry and food industry in general, fluctuations in availability and cost of high-quality green coffee, any other increases in costs including fuel, Keurig’s ability to continue to grow and build profits with its roaster partners in the office and at home businesses, the impact of the loss of major customers for the Company or reduction in the volume of purchases by major customers, delays in the timing of adding new locations with existing customers, the Company’s level of success in continuing to attract new customers, sales mix variances, weather and special or unusual events, as well as other risks described more fully in the Company’s filings with the SEC. Forward-looking statements reflect management’s analysis as of the date of this press release. The Company does not undertake to revise these statements to reflect subsequent developments, other than in its regular, quarterly earnings releases. WATERBURY, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–last_img read more

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MSBs – Too hot to handle?

first_img 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Many credit unions have become concerned recently about having money services businesses (MSBs) as members. It’s no secret that regulators are looking at MSBs through a newly enhanced risk lens.Does that mean that you should not have MSBs as members? The answer is a resounding NO! It is possible to have MSBs as members while still managing the potential risk that may be associated with these businesses.So, how do you do it? First, you will need to establish a special monitoring program for these accounts that starts at account opening. Think “enhanced due diligence” when you open these accounts. In addition to typical CIP procedures, you’ll want to gather additional information such as what type of MSB they are, what MSB activities they engage in, whether they are registered with FinCEN, whether they have a BSA/AML program and establishing what typical transactions for them will be, to name a few.Then you need to conduct a risk assessment of the MSB and their activity. Areas to include in the assessment would be typical transactions, services offered, ownership, office locations, level of revenues produced by financial activities, as well as other considerations. Be sure to include traditional BSA/AML activities in the risk assessment. The results of the risk assessment will determine whether additional due diligence is required such as a review of their AML program, conducting an on-site visit, review of their training and written procedures, etc. continue reading »last_img read more

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Asante Africa: My heart is full from your cooperative spirit

first_imgThank you, Africa. I’m writing this at 38,000 feet on a Kenya Airways flight between Nairobi and Paris. My guess is I’m somewhere over north Africa. The cabin is dark. Everyone is sleeping, but I’m wide awake thinking– starting to unpack– the week that was.Over the past week, I had some of the most inspiring experiences in my career in credit unions. Ten days ago, I was making the long trek from my home in West Hartford, Connecticut, to Mombasa, Kenya: 24 hours of airplanes and airports to attend the 20th SACCA Congress, put on by the team at ACCOSCA, the African Confederation of Cooperative Savings and Credit Association. Think CUNA but for all the countries in Africa. My agenda was loosely filled and subject to change. I landed in Mombasa, Kenya with no expectations for the week and a commitment to being present, going with the flow, and taking it all in.Those experiences started almost immediately with the first annual Africa Women in Co-ops Network Forum. This forum was a key step in the Development Educator (DE) project for Bettyrose Okiri of ACCOSCA. I was overwhelmed with joy seeing her project thrive: Men and women had come in from across the continent—three days before the conference’s official start date– to attend this full-day event.  More and more chairs had to be brought in to line the walls and accommodate the overflowing crowd, all of whom remained engaged throughout the day. By the session’s end at 4 p.m., the room still as full as it had been that morning. It was impossible to capture the energy and optimism through photos, but I tried anyway.It didn’t take long for the next experience to arrive. The following day I was invited to join Lois Kitsch, George Ombado, David Mategwa, Brent Rempe, and Bill and Crissy Cheney on a trip back to the Don Bosco Special School in Likuyani. It had been my privilege over the summer to work alongside an amazing group of DEs on this passion project of David and Brent: A school library and community center to provide for students whose school was often overlooked for public funding. It was a remarkable opportunity to revisit the site where we had hoped to make an impact—and where the most remote episode of The CUInsight Experience podcast was recorded, with Lois Kitsch and me sitting on paint cans.Spending 24 hours awake and taking four flights across the country left me with only one regret: That the entire group who I had served alongside this summer could not share in the experience of seeing the kids and the community experience their new library—the first of its kind in the area– for the first time. Again, I took so many pictures in an effort to capture this spirit and share it with you.By this point, the actual conference- the key purpose of my week- had still not begun. It was hard to believe, though, with the number of people already buzzing around the venue. Pre-conference workshops were busting at the seams, participation often double the number of people who had registered. Rooms set up for 60 were filled with 125 cooperators. The start of the conference was still ahead, but the energy at the venue had arrived. You could already tell this would be a spectacular week.Next, it was time for the opening ceremony. Close to 1000 cooperators from over 35 counties filed the main ballroom. Another unexpected experience came my way when Mr. Bert J. Hash Jr. approached and asked if I would like to represent the United States during the flag ceremony. To walk in with the stars and stripes waving high, seeing the delegation from the states standing and singing along to our national anthem, is a moment and an honor I won’t forget.Finally, the actual 20th SACCA Congress was underway. As someone who attends a lot of credit union conferences, I was blown away by the packed rooms and engagement from the first session to the last. Even on the final day, no one was off taking the opportunity to enjoy the beautiful Indian Ocean. The room was full up through the very last session.The people who made up this conference inspired me. They are not only improving the lives of the members in their SACCOs (credit unions), but they are also lifting their countries and the continent as a whole. I found myself often listening, watching, taking pictures of people’s faces and wondering what Kenya and the rest of Africa will look like a generation from now.Africa is rising and it was one of the greatest honors of my life to watch and experience a small moment of it. I hope the pictures tell the story better than my words can.I am excited to continue to engage further with ACCOSCA and the SACCOs on the continent. There is an energy that is contagious and that draws you in for more. I know the friends that I have made on my two trips to Kenya this year will be lifelong. You will probably see more from Africa over the next year as I help George and his team at ACCOSCA launch SACCOinsight (which I have identified as my personal DE project). It will be the first news publication for credit unions on the continent. I can’t wait to see how the stories that will fill those digital pages will inspire us all.I’d like to end with a shout-out to some of those I shared this experience with: George Ombado, I’m so glad to call you a friend and look forward to many years of collaboration ahead. David Mategwa, your infectious smile and hospitality makes us all feel so welcome. You are an amazing ambassador and protector of Kenya. Maureen Wairimu, you and Bettyrose hold the entire event together. Coordinating all of us from every corner of the world while launching your own projects as well. Bill and Crissy Cheney, it was a pleasure to get to know you better sharing this experience. I look forward to sharing more soon. Brent Rempe your passion for Don Bosco and all that you’ve done has been amazing to witness. Any day I can spend with Mr. Bert J. Hash Jr. is a good day. If you have the chance to get stuck in an airport with Bert for three hours and just talk, do it. Julie Ferguson, I’m so glad I got to share your first experience in Kenya and see the inspiration of your DE project come to you. I can’t wait to watch it grow. Getting to know Michael Ray was a true pleasure and I congratulate you on the Distinguished Services Award you were honored with at the SACCA Congress, it was well deserved. Renee Sattiewhite, I loved the conversation we’ve started and the collaboration ahead. And, of course, the woman who made these experiences happen for me, Ms. Lois Kitsch. On the way back to the airport I commented that it was clear Lois retired to develop DEs on a second continent. Her DE tree in the US is long, and now in retirement, her DE tree in Africa has amazing roots and is growing tall.  I’m grateful to you all and the many more who touched my life this week. Credit union = Happy familyFollow CUInsight on Instagram. I kept a running story of the experience that you can view on our profile.Stay tuned to The CUInsight Experience podcast for upcoming episodes with Bill, Julie and George, all recorded in Mombasa, Kenya. 130SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Virus breaks funeral traditions in Italy

first_img“It is much more difficult, emotionally,” Revello’s funeral parlor owner Gianpiero Palmero told AFP.Large funerals have been banned in Italy for more than a month because of the new illness that has officially killed more than 26,000 people in the Mediterranean country since February.The real toll is unknown since many of those who pass away in old age are never tested for the virus.The rushed funeral arrangements mean grieving families have almost no time to say their final goodbyes. Palmero takes it personally.”We really are living in abnormal times,” Palmero says. “There is more demand for our services.”Italy is cautiously approaching the moment when it is ready to lift some of its harshest restrictions on everyday life.People might be allowed to walk the streets freely starting on May 4.Mores stores and churches will probably reopen.And weddings and funerals might soon again involve more than just the pastor and immediate family members.But Italy is not there yet — and Palmero still collects his bodies at the hospital in nearby Saluzzo.”The bodies are already wrapped in a shroud,” he explains. “We put the body in the coffin and seal it immediately.”Social distancing measures are even observed at the crematorium. Only one person is allowed inside at a time.Not catching or spreading the virus is the overriding consideration in Palmero’s business.”There are no more real funerals,” he laments. The coffins are sealed directly at the hospital morgue near the tiny Italian town of Revello on the French border.Everyone in Revello understands it is safer that way since so many of those who have died across Italy’s pandemic-hit north first contracted the novel coronavirus.The tradition of families passing by open caskets to say silent farewells to the deceased at churches or at funeral parlours has been abandoned.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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SAUL Trustee appoints Ensign’s Applegarth as chief executive

first_imgThe SAUL Trustee Company has appointed Sue Applegarth as chief executive, replacing Penny Green, who is to retire at the end of the year.Applegarth is currently chairman of Ensign Pension Administration but is to leave her role as the third-party administrator was recently sold to consultancy JLT Employee Benefits.She will take up her role at beginning of November, with Green stepping down at the end of 2014 after 14 years as chief executive.SAUL Trustee Company provides trustee and administration services to the £1.9bn Superannuation Arrangements of the University of London (SAUL), a pension arrangement for non-academic staff of the University of London and associated companies. It also provides third-party administration services to pension schemes in the higher education and publishing sectors, under the brand STC Pension Management.Applegarth has been at Ensign since 2002, when the company was called MNPA and was the in-house administration team for the Merchant Navy Officers’ Pension Fund (MNOPF), while also offering third-party services.In 2013, MNPA rebranded its third-party services as Ensign before the administration arm was sold to JLT EB.last_img read more

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Slain OFW in Kuwait was sexually abused – DOJ

first_imgA partial deployment ban there iscurrently in place. Because of the “false” autopsy report,Bello said he would recommend to the Philippine Overseas EmploymentAdministration (POEA) a permanent deployment ban of household service workersto Kuwait, promising to deliver justice for Villavende. Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra said“there were clear indications” that Jeanelyn Villavende was sexually abused. There were alsoold healed wounds on Villavende’s body, which indicated that she was“battered weeks prior” to her death, Guevarra added, citing NBI’sautopsy report. The formal report will be submitted tohis office today, Guevarra said. MANILA – The Filipina domestic workerwho was slain allegedly by her ownemployers in Kuwait last December also suffered sexual abuse, based on an autopsyconducted by the National Bureau of Investigation. center_img Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra. PCOO Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III hassaid he doubted the credibility of Kuwaiti forensic doctors, who sent atwo-sentence report of their autopsy saying Villavende died of “physicalinjuries.” The suspect in Villavende’s slay wasalready in the custody of Kuwaiti authorities, Philippine officials earliersaid. (With ABS-CBN News/PN)last_img read more

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SU players liked his food. Now, Michael Brooks is pursuing his dream.

first_imgMichael Brooks sat in the crowd at a Boeheim’s Army game this past summer and spotted a familiar face across the Carrier Dome. Brooks, a native of Oswego, went to Syracuse games often as a kid. The 21-year-old grew up with the team, the city, the players. Brooks wanted to cook for them. The chef de cuisine at La Parilla grill & wine bar had recently received an opportunity to cook in the Hamptons. But Brooks’ dream is to become a personal chef. He messaged Syracuse basketball players on Instagram: “Let me cook for you and the guys broo.” For a long time, he got nothing. Then, his phone flashed with a reply.“(Your) meals look tough bro where you from?” SU point guard Howard Washington, the familiar face, replied.Washington became his first customer. Then Brendan Paul. Then women’s basketball guard Lauren Fitzmaurice and center Maeva Djaldi-Tabdi. And Jalen Carey, Tommy DeVito and Elijah Hughes. Since July, people have seen Brooks on Instagram, posing with food or interacting with athletes, and interest is growing. Brooks dreams of one day being a personal chef for NBA players and has now created a small network within his community.“They’re good people to have in your corner,” Brooks said. “You never know what can happen.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBrooks used to cook a little when he was younger — mostly macaroni and cheese — but his love for cooking began when he was hired at La Parilla almost three years ago as a “salad guy” and quickly worked his way up. His chef, Raymond Jock, taught him the importance of food presentation. Brooks took the challenge. He started the Instagram account @mikebrookscooks, where he posted photos of food attached to the slogan #DateAChef.Courtesy of Zay MaverickHe discovered people respond to the food like it’s art. His rise has been similar to many modern chefs, who, without direct products to offer, use social media to promote service and precision. Richard Ingraham, a professional personal chef who now works exclusively for Dwyane Wade and Gabrielle Union, said he rarely fills his social media pages with pictures of himself. Brooks has started to follow suit, only using social media to build his brand. “You use the plate as your canvas and you make something beautiful,” Brooks said. “And people love it.”Working 50-60 hours weekly at La Parilla, he prepared and delivered meals to interested clients on Sundays and Mondays — his days off. He started by offering meals for free, but as word spread, he charged a fee. He gets discounted ingredients from the wholesale provider at the restaurant he works for and has expanded his creativity by watching videos, scrolling through Instagram and reading cookbooks. He tests himself by creating specials at La Parilla and contacts professional chefs, like Ingraham, for advice.Brooks said some athletes on the SU men’s basketball and football teams have expressed interest in meal plans: five to seven meals per week prepared and delivered. If the first people to try it enjoy the idea — he said he knows they will — it will only further expand a notable network of Syracuse-level celebrities.“I know I make some good stuff, let’s just say that,” Brooks said. “I think they know it too.”Now, Brooks said he feels like the players he works with, the people he’s met through cooking, they all have his back. And he said for someone who grew up watching Syracuse basketball, it’s surreal. He often expresses that appreciation where he knows best.“the guy who started it all 4 me (love) u,” Brooks commented on one of Washington’s recent Instagram posts“@mikebrookscooks you know brotha! ,” Washington wrote back.Sitting in a Café Kubal recently, Brooks smiled. “That’s pretty cool.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 6, 2020 at 12:04 am Contact Michael: [email protected] | @MikeJMcClearylast_img read more

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NPFL: MFM FC’s Teenage Striker, Waheed, Puts Pillars to the Sword…

first_imgRESULTSRangers                1-1 TornadoesPlateau Utd           2-1 Abia WarriorsEnyimba               2-1 NasarawaWikki                    3-1 IfeanyiUbahKatsina Utd           1-1 Akwa UtdGombe Utd            2-0 SunshineMFM FC                 1-0 Kano PillarsRemo                    2-0 El KanemiRivers Utd             0-0 LobiABS FC                  2-0 Shooting A sublime header from teenage striker Adebayo Waheed was just enough for Mountain of Fire and Miracles Ministries Football Club to secure their third home win of the season against Kano Pillars in one of yesterday’s fixtures of Match-day 5 of the Nigeria Professional Football League (NPFL) decided at the Agege Township Stadium.It was indeed a tough encounter for Fidelis Ilechukwu’s men. The visitors dominated possession in the early stage of the exchange but MFM defenders gave good account of themselves with great level of composure.MFM FC mounted pressure on the visitors’ defence in the 8th minute with Onuwa Chukwuka, Sikiru Olatunbosun and Stephen Odey troubling the Sai Masu Gida defenders.The Olukoya Boys had a chance to register the first goal of the game in the 16th minute of the encounter when Adekunle Adegboyega low shot beat Pillars goalkeeper but Chinedu Udoji stopped the forward from scoring his second goal of the season with a timely goalline clearance.Former Ikorodu United attacker Kabir Balogun tested MFM FC goalkeeper Ospino Egbe in the 36th minute of the game with a ferocious shot but the former Bayelsa United goaltender pulled a lovely save. First half ended goalless for both teams.Ilechukwu’s men came out like a house on fire in the second half of the game. Onuwa set Odey up with a beautiful pass the latter dribbled past his markers but his last attempt on the ball went inches wide.Four minutes after Odey’s attempt at goal, MFM FC boss made his first substitution of the game replacing Adekunle with 18-year-old striker Adebayo Waheed.The teenager made his impact felt five minutes after his introduction scoring his side’s only goal of the game in his first NPFL appearance with a brilliant header after connecting a cross from Stanley Okorom. The game ended with the Lagos-based team claiming another home victory.The Olukoya Boys who moved from 3rd position to 2nd on the NPFL log with 10 points from a possible 15 will travel to Akure for a date with Sunshine Stars on Sunday in an encounter tagged ‘South-west Derby.’At the Gateway International Stadium in Sagamu, Remo Stars FC shook off the tensions of a newcomer to spank old war horse, El Kanemi Warriors, 2-0 to harvest maximum points in the NPFL match day five clash.The hosts left no room for guesses as they drew first blood with an early goal that left the visitors from Maiduguri in shock when Onuoha Chukwujekwu blasted in from close range a rebound from goal rush in two minutes of the whistle.All efforts by the Ladan Bosso boys to level up in the first half were effectively voided by the determined defence of the hosts to keep their lead into the break.Thunder however struck a second time as Remo scored again just three minutes into the second half when Oche Salefu curled in a free kick from the edge of the box to double the lead.Disappointed El Kanemi coach, Ladan Bosso, has been left to wonder how his boys couldn’t manage the critical times of the game.For Remo Stars coach, Nduka Ugbade, it is all coming together gradually for the team and he believes they will surely stabilise into a force in the elite league.“Analysis have shown that we are about the only team that has scored in every match, home or away, win or lose. That is good. It means we have some element and we will continue to sharpen our form.”In Port Harcourt, Rivers United fired blanks against a spirited Lobi Stars side in a largely uninspiring 0-0 draw. Rivers United slipped from second to fifth with nine points from five matches as a result of the draw while Lobi Stars now occupies tenth spot on the NPFL log with seven points from their opening five fixtures.  Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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