Here’s Everything We Learned From Dead & Company Bassist Oteil Burbridge’s Reddit AMA

first_imgThis past week, bassist Oteil Burbridge gave fans a chance to get inside his head with an official Reddit AMA. Coming off an incredible month on the road with Dead & Company, fans were eager to hear about his experiences, his views, his vocals, and more. Check out a collection of hot takes and interesting anecdotes shared during Oteil’s AMA:Reddit: What was your first “holy shit” moment during this past D&C tour?Oteil: “I’ve had a number of ‘holy shit’ moments, starting from the first day of the first rehearsal and looking across the room and seeing Bill, John, Bob, Mickey and Jeff. My next ‘holy shit’ moment was right after the show in Albany when we realized that the fans like what we were doing and weren’t going to crucify me and John! My third ‘holy shit’ moment was playing my very first stadium show, which I believe was Folsom Field. My fourth ‘holy shit’ moment was the first night I sang China Doll and my fifth was the first night singing Comes a Time. Pretty much every moment since then has been a ‘holy shit’ moment.”On the differences between playing with the Allman Brothers Band and playing with Dead & Company:“One of the major and most obvious differences between the two is that the Grateful Dead will play quiet for a lot longer. Also the Grateful Dead has a lot more diversity in song forms. They tend to be longer in some cases and when you take a solo you have to play through the entire form which is more difficult than playing a simple 2 or 3 chord jam. While the Grateful Dead certainly have plenty of 2 and 3 chord jam solo sections, you get these tunes like Crazy Fingers, Lost Sailor/Saint of Circumstance, etc. where you are going to be playing through a lot more chord changes. It’s one of the things that I love about the Garcia ballads… changes like Stella Blue, China Doll… That being said, the ABB came from a really hard-driving, hard-grooving blues and R&B background that was filled with deep voodoo. We also had the country and bluegrass side that tapped into American folk roots. We also got into some really deep grooves and also explored the jazzier side of open-ended jams. That’s where I think the ABB and the Grateful Dead meet is in the longer jam explorations.”On his “dinosaur stomp” dancing onstage: “I’m sure you can find video of me doing the “dinosaur stomp” with the ABB [too]! Derek [Trucks] and [Warren] Haynes are obviously not known for dancing or moving around a lot. I’m one of those people that is a mover. I am a drummer first and the point of drums is to make people want to dance. They are inseparable to me. If a groove is really good and strong, I’m going to be moving to it and [John] Mayer is the same way. I would also add that John and my chemistry has really grown this last tour. It’s just something that takes time.” What songs do you want to sing for Dead & Co in the future?“‘To Lay Me Down,’ ‘If I Had The World to Give,’ ‘Sing Me Back Home,’ ‘Mountains of the Moon’ and a few others. I’m working on those now.”Have you discussed singing any of Brent’s songs? I think your voice would be perfect for a few of them.“Bill Walton requested this same thing of me and I told him that I would do my best. Sad to say, it will be damn near impossible for me to do it as Brent sings unbelievably high a lot of the time. And he does this in his natural voice, it’s not falsetto. Precious few humans have this ability. I really wish that I could and I will make an attempt but if I can’t do it justice at home I’m not going to butcher it on stage.”On trying to “sound like the original”:“You cannot please everyone. I’m first in the line of believing that Phil Lesh is the true sound of the Grateful Dead. Honestly, I miss it myself sometimes. But I cannot be anything other than what I am. Indeed I have encountered some criticism but I also am aware that the vast majority of the fans like what I am doing as different as it is from the original. I try to think more about my energy and putting out positivity than anything else.”On his favorite Dead and Allman songs to play:“My favorite ABB songs to play are ‘Cross to Bear,’ ‘Dreams,’ ‘Please Call Home,’ ‘Blue Sky’… there are so many. As far as Dead songs go, since the beginning and still to this day, Grateful Dead ballads are among my top favorites. Both Jerry’s and Bob’s. Obviously I love ‘Stella Blue,’ ‘China Doll,’ ‘Comes a Time,’ ‘Standing on the Moon’… I could go on and on. And also Bob’s ‘Black Throated Wind,’ ‘Looks Like Rain,’ ‘Lost Sailor,’ etc.”On his favorite place to play:“Red Rocks when the weather is perfect! But honestly, my favorite place to play – where I’ve never had a bad gig – is a small place called the Fox Theater in Boulder.”center_img Do you think of Butch Trucks when you sing China Doll?“Yeah, I absolutely do. You can probably see me crying on videos of me singing ‘China Doll’ sometimes. And there’s other people I think about too, including Jerry. I’ve experienced quite a lot of loss this year that makes me think about deaths, recent and past.”You always seem so happy and positive in stage. How do you stay upbeat after long stretches of touring and performing?“People ask me this question a lot and I always answer ‘I have such a good time because I meant to before I got there.’ What we do should be, in my opinion, a celebration. If we’re all lucky enough to be there together on that same day in reasonable health we should celebrate. You guys actually paid money. It seems to me you should at least see me being happy to be there! It’s such great music in such great venues and there’s so much joy and anticipation that you can practically taste it. I start smiling well before I get on stage. How sweet it is!”On how he came to take on more singing duties this summer:“It happened organically, really. I wanted to sing ‘China Doll’ since the first rehearsal when it came up and neither Bob nor John wanted to sing it. It just wasn’t time yet. This was before we even figured out what kind of chemistry we had musically. It started with Bob asking me to sing ‘Box of Rain’ actually. And while I like ‘Box of Rain,’ I figured if I finally got asked to sing an entire song and not just a verse of GDTRFB, that I’d rather sing a song that totally blew me away emotionally and so I suggested ‘China Doll’ (again). And that time it took! Some things can’t be rushed. People that know me well have often heard me say “plants bloom when they bloom and not one second before” so I never fight against the timing.On advice he’d give to young bassists:“Col. Bruce told me 99% of success is just showing up. What he meant by that was if you persevere for 5 years and then quit but your ship came in 5 years and 2 months later, then you missed your opportunity. The other crucial piece of advice is to always give people something that they can’t get anywhere else and that one thing is you. Nobody else is like you. If you find a way to let your true self come through your instrument, you will automatically be giving people something that they cannot get anywhere else. And finally, hold on to your joy by any means necessary!”On upcoming projects:My new record will be coming out this fall and I’ll be touring with my solo project, Oteil & Friends, in November with Melvin Seals, Eric Krasno, John Kadlecik, Jay Lane, Weedie Braimah and Alfreda Gerald.On starting with drums:“Drums was my first instrument, I started at 5 years old. When we were kids we all played piano and violin. Later I picked up bass clarinet, vibes, guitar, and more recently I fell deeply in love with the 5-string banjo.”On his reactions to Long Strange Trip:“I watched it while I was on the road with Dead & Co. right before Jess and Nigel came out. I went straight through one morning and watched all four hours. It’s so mind blowing to see pictures of Bill, who I met in 2008, from 1965. I was one-year-old then. For every single year documented in Long Strange Trip, I have a personal reference for in my life. That was a mind blower. When I look across the stage and I see these gentlemen, it’s really humbling to think of just how long they’ve been playing in this one band. No matter whether you like the Grateful Dead or not, you have to respect them. Long Strange Trip really showed me how the Grateful Dead has changed American culture. If America is the strongest country in the world, then what does that say about the Grateful Dead? They’ve always stood for peace and love and they’ve always tried to spread that even through their own trials and tribulations. And judging from the feeling of love and joy that I feel from the crowd, their mission has been a complete success. They’ve paid heavy prices for it at times, the heaviest – even the ultimate price. And they’re still here with the exact same mission.”On jamming:“If I’m lucky, I have plenty of time in advance of rehearsals to work on the songs. I usually listen to as many versions in different decades of the same song as I can. You can actually do this with groups like the Grateful Dead and the Allman Brothers Band. I need to hear how the song has morphed over the years. I also like to listen to the songs around the house when I’m not playing bass to get it in my head more. I prefer not to read charts on the gig, that’s why I walk around the house listening to it. Fortunately my wife doesn’t mind cause she’s a huge deadhead! Every jam is semi-rehearsed, but the point of any jam is to acknowledge the threat that the jam might go off in its own direction at any time. We’re fanning the flames of that happening in a sense every time we start off on a jam.”On Col. Bruct Hampton:“When I first met the Col., he guessed my birthday within 3 minutes of when I was born. I actually know my time of birth because my mom was really into astrology. When I asked him “how did you get it within 3 minutes?” he said, ‘your nose was screaming it.’ Like Bill said about Jerry, I knew from that moment on that I was going to follow him wherever he went.”“Initially, Col. Bruce led the band much as his name would indicate. Even though the band was rooted in an improvisational and even free form philosophy, he was very hard on us in the beginning. He would poke me with drum sticks and called me and Jeff Sipe and Jimmy Herring “20 percenters” because he said we were only giving 20% of what we actually had. We didn’t really understand his philosophy at that time and so I guess he was just trying to beat it into us! But when I started to see what he was talking about it completely changed my life and I realized that he was right… that I was giving him my preconception of what I was and he wanted me to tear down the walls of that preconception and let out what I really was. He was the one that made me start singing. He said the voice was the first and most powerful instrument. After singing lead at Wrigley Field to a sold out house, he proved to be right once again. Thank you Col., for everything.”On his favorite moments bringing his family on tour this sumer:“After my brother Kofi had emergency heart surgery, the first day that I was back on the road and everything had settled down, we were doing soundcheck and we were playing ‘Women are Smarter’ and I could see Jess and Nigel up on the lawn dancing and she was swinging him around in circles and I realized at that moment that everything was ok. Kofi was going to be ok… it was a perfect beautiful day… I was soundchecking on stage with Dead & Company and watching my beautiful wife and child have a hallmark moment out on the lawn. I wish I had a picture of it.”Do you ever jam with Mike Gordon? Are you going to see any Phish shows this summer?“Mike has been a friend of mine for a long time, since the old ARU days as is Page [McConnell], Jon Fishman and Trey Anastasio. In fact, Mike [Gordon] is the one that introduced me to Bill Kreutzmann in 2008 and he is the 2nd person we know to wear the “Let Oteil Sing” shirt! We have jammed together in the past and I certainly hope we will again in the future. I would love to see some Phish shows this summer, but my 2.5 year old has curtailed a lot of my concert-going these days. I’m in kid-raising mode right now and hopefully when I do get to see Phish shows again, Nigel will be coming along with me! Lord knows his mama loves her some Phish!”[Cover photo: Dave Vann]last_img read more

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The “Phish Song Cognition Theory” Explains What Types Of Phish We Like & Why

first_imgRecently, writers Andy P. Smith and Jason Gershuny released a brand-new book on the beloved jam act, Phish. Titled 100 Things Phish Fan Should Know & Do Before They Die, the book spans Phistory from the band’s earliest days until today, offering 100 concise chapters ranging from the band’s history to notable performances, albums, and sit-ins to the band’s and fan’s culture and intertwining symbiotic relationship.Below you can read an excerpted essay from 100 Things Phish Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die, which talks about the “Phish Song Cognition Theory”—a concept Smith and Gershuny introduce that explains how and why people view this prolific group so differently. Check it out for yourself below, and head here to pick up a copy of the book.64. The Phish Song Cognition TheoryIn Ed Levine’s 2010 book Pizza: A Slice of Heaven, he interviewed Sam Sifton, the New York Times food editor. Sifton describes what he calls the “Pizza Cognition Theory.”Sifton says, “There is a theory of cognitive development that says children learn to identify things only in opposition to other things. Only the child who has learned what is not brown, the theory holds, can discern what is ‘brown.’”“Pizza naturally throws this theory into a tailspin. The first slice of pizza a child sees and tastes (and somehow appreciates on something more than a childlike, mmm goood, thanks-mom level), becomes, for him, pizza. He relegates all subsequent slices, if they are different in some manner from that first triangle of dough and cheese and tomato and oil and herbs and spices, to a status that we can characterize as not pizza.”In short, your first encounter with something defines how you identify with that thing in your heart and mind.“The first slice of pizza a child sees and tastes…becomes, for him, pizza. You cannot teach a child what pizza is, this explanation of pizza cognition asserts, by providing him with oppositional ingredients or styles. The love of pizza simply doesn’t work that way. Invariably, if a child’s first slice of pizza comes from a deep-dish Chicago pie or is a slick, chewy pillow of Sicilian or half-hour-guaranteed-delivery cardboard Frisbee or a frozen French-bread travesty, semolina-dusted ‘Creole’ or sweet pineapple and plastic ham ‘Hawaiian’ pie, then, well, that is pizza to him. He will defend this interpretation to the end of his life.”I would like to propose a theory for Phish based on Sifton’s claim. While the first slice of pizza a child enjoys defines all other slices, the same can be said for Phish fans and their favorite songs or type of songs. We can all agree that one’s first Phish show is a special experience. No matter how many albums or live shows you may have heard, there is nothing that compares to that first live show. In many ways, you cannot teach someone what Phish is. (At best, we can only suggest 100 Things.) And like Sifton’s pizza theory, I would propose that if someone’s first Phish show is deep, dark, and funky, well, that’s what Phish is to them. If that first show is loose, ambient, and spacey, that’s their Phish.Or perhaps this is best understood with regard to the 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 eras. For those touring in the late 1990s, Phish may only be “cow-funk” Phish, and all other Phish is simply subpar. Whereas someone catching a bunch of 2.0 shows, well, Phish for them may be “Seven Below” and “Walls of the Cave.” Our younger fans may absolutely yearn for “Fuego,” while older fans will scoff it off. These youngsters are just victims to the Phish Cognition Theory: that first Phish will always be your true Phish.Personally, if I had to choose just one favorite Phish song it would be “The Squirming Coil” from 1990’s Lawn Boy. Now, I hadn’t discovered the band until some years later and still wouldn’t see Phish live until 1998. So this doesn’t quite seem to prove my theory. Or does it?Looking back at my first show, my first live Phish experience at The Gorge in 1998 (July 16, 1998), I was pleasantly surprised to discover that Phish had indeed opened with “The Squirming Coil.” While I had no strong memory of this, it has clearly left an indelible mark on my psyche, and I still get chills every time I hear the band play “Coil.” And for those of you thinking, They opened with Coil? I hear ya.Yes, traditionally the song closes a set or fills the encore slot. In fact, according to Phish.net, of the 351 times Phish has performed “The Squirming Coil,” they have only opened a show with the song four times: twice in 1990, once in 1997, and once at The Gorge on that beautiful summer evening in June of 1998.And it just so happens that “Coil” is not only my favorite Phish song, but also the very first Phish song I had heard performed live. Now, who wants a slice of pizza?last_img read more

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TAUK Releases New All-Instrumental Album, ‘Shapeshifter II: Outbreak’ [Listen]

first_imgBrooklyn-based instrumental rock-fusion quartet TAUK released their new album, Shapeshifter II: Outbreak, today.  Following up their early-2018 EP, Shapeshifter I: Construct, the 11-track studio effort marks TAUK’s seventh to date. The all-instrumental, yet free-flowing studio effort, meshes elements of hip-hop, rock and roll, and jazz, while incorporating elements of the sci-fi narrative, extraterrestrial life, and artificial intelligence. The band recently released a sci-fi, animated music video, for their single “Recreational Outrage”. Watch TAUK’s animated video below.TAUK – “Recreational Outrage”[Video: TAUK]The album was produced by longtime TAUK cohort and Grammy-winning producer/mixer/engineer Robert Carranza (The Mars Volta, Ozomatli, Marilyn Manson, Taj Mahal). In contrast to their previous albums like 2016’s Sir Nebula, the foursome skipped the traditional studio environment for Shapeshifter II: Outbreak, instead holing up in a long-abandoned, 100-year-old Long Island home, which drummer Isaac Teel describes as “the Jumanji house meets Addams Family meets Amityville Horror.” You can listen to TAUK’s full album below.TAUK – ‘Shapeshifter II: Outbreak’TAUK heads out on a two-month tour, where they will be joined by Flux Capacitor, Funk You, Dynamo, Jonathan Scales Fourchestra, Exmag, Kudo Stooge, AMFM and Sun & Rain, McLovins, Kung Fu, and The Motet at various stops. TAUK’s fall tour kicks off with an appearance tomorrow at Meetings of The Minds in Schuylkill Haven, PA, before officially kicking off tour October 4th in Rochester, NY. The four-piece will continue throughout the Northeast with stops in Burlington, VT, New York City, and Harrisburg, PA, before heading south. On October 10th, TAUK plays Lexington, KY’s The Burl, followed by stops in Knoxville, TN, Athens, GA,—including a two-night run at the Charleston Pour House in Charleston, SC—before heading west.Following a stop in New Orleans October 18th, the band will make stops in Houston and Dallas, TX on the 19th and 20th, before working their way up the Pacific Coast. Up next is a run across Phoenix, Los Angeles, Santa Cruz, and Berkeley from October 24th-27th, with a special Halloween show at Bend, OR’s Volcanic Theatre Pub on the 31st. The band continues north with stops in Eugene, Seattle, and Portland from November 1st-3rd, before heading back East through the Rockies. Following stops in Missoula, Bozeman, Salt Lake City, Boulder, and Winter Park, CO from November 6th-10th, the band will wrap up tour with five stops in St. Louis, Indianapolis, Lousiville, Cleveland, and Buffalo, November 13th-17th.For more information about the new album or TAUK’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website here. TAUK Upcoming Fall Tour DatesSep 29 – Schuylkill Haven, PA – Meetings of the MindsOct 04 – Rochester, NY – The Music Hall @ Funk ‘n Waffles @Oct 05 – Burlington, VT – ArtsRiot **Oct 06 – New York, NY – Gramercy Theatre ^^Oct 07 – Harrisburg, PA – Club XL $Oct 10 – Lexington, KY – The Burl #Oct 11 – Knoxville, TN – Concourse @ The International #Oct 12 – Athens, GA – Georgia Theatre #Oct 13 – Charleston, SC – Charleston Pour House *Oct 14 – Charleston, SC – Charleston Pour House ^Oct 17 – Huntsville, AL – Sidetracks Music Hall #Oct 18 – New Orleans, LA – Tipitina’s #Oct 19 – Houston, TX – The Secret Group #Oct 20 – Dallas, TX – Club Dada #Oct 21 – Fayetteville, AR – George’s Majestic Lounge #Oct 24 – Phoenix, AZ – Last Exit Live &Oct 25 – Los Angeles, CA – Lodge Room &Oct 26 – Santa Cruz, CA – The Catalyst (Atrium) &Oct 27 – Berkeley, CA – Cornerstone Berkeley &Oct 31 – Bend, OR – Volcanic Theatre Pub &Nov 01 – Eugene, OR – Wildcraft Cider Works &Nov 02 – Seattle, WA – Nectar Lounge &Nov 03 – Portland, OR – Star Theater &Nov 06 – Missoula, MT – Top Hat Lounge &Nov 07 – Bozeman, MT – The Filling Station &Nov 08 – Salt Lake City, UT – The State Room &Nov 09 – Boulder, CO – Fox Theatre &Nov 10 – Winter Park, CO – Ullrs Tavern &Nov 13 – St. Louis, MO – Old Rock House &Nov 14 – Indianapolis, IN – The Hi-Fi &Nov 15 – Louisville, KY – Headliners Music Hall &Nov 16 – Cleveland, OH – Beachland Ballroom &Nov 17 – Buffalo, NY – Buffalo Iron Works &Dec 21 – New Haven, CT – Toad’s Place ##Dec 28 – Albany, NY – Jupiter Hall @ Lucky Strike Social %Jan 15-Jan 21 – Jam Cruise 17 – Port of Miami, [email protected] w/ Flux Capacitor# w/ Funk You* w/ Dynamo^ w Jonathan Scales Fourchestra& w/ Exmag** w/ Kudu Stooge$ w/ AMFM and Sun & Rain^^ w/ McLovins## w/ Kung Fu% w/ The MotetView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Eric Clapton Announces 3-Night Royal Albert Hall Run

first_imgEric Clapton has announced his first dates of 2019 and only U.K. shows of the upcoming year, with a three-night run at London’s Royal Albert Hall. Taking place May 13th, 15th, and 16th of 2019, Clapton has rounded up longtime collaborators, including guitarist Doyle Bramhall II, keyboardist Chris Stainton, bassist Nathan East, and drummer Sonny Emory.Tickets for Slowhand’s 2019 U.K. run go on sale this Friday, October 26th at 10 a.m. local time. Tickets are limited to 6 per household and are available from the venue box office, by phone and online (no counter sales), BookingsDirect.com and select authorized agents.Earlier this year, Eric Clapton announced that his final North American shows of 2018 would take place at Madison Square Garden in New York City on October 6th and 7th. In discussion with BBC Radio, he also discussed that he is losing his hearing and suffering from tinnitus, a ringing inside the ear that is often caused by prolonged exposure to loud noise.In that same interview, Clapton noted, “I’ve had quite a lot of pain over the last year. It started with lower back pain, and turned into what they call peripheral neuropathy,” he added. “[It’s] hard work to play the guitar and I’ve had to come to terms with the fact that it will not improve.” Clapton went on to tell BBC’s Stephen Wright that he would be limiting the number of plays going forward, explaining, “‘What I’ll allow myself to do, within reason, is carry on recording in the studio. I don’t want to go off the boil to the point where I’m embarrassing myself.”For more information on tickets and the upcoming Royal Albert Hall shows, head to Eric Clapton’s website here.[H/T Jambase]last_img read more

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Joe Russo, Jeff Chimenti, Scott Metzger, & More Join Forces To Host ‘The Complete Last Waltz’ At The Cap [Videos]

first_imgOn Saturday night, an all-star cast of musicians joined forces at Port Chester, NY’s Capitol Theatre to host The Complete Last Waltz in honor of The Band‘s legendary farewell concert, The Last Waltz, from on Thanksgiving day 1976.The Complete Last Waltz house band consisted of keyboardists Marco Benevento and Jeff Chimenti, guitarists Scott Metzger and Sam Cohen, drummer Joe Russo, bassist Dave Dreiwitz, and multi-instrumentalist Josh Kaufman, with help from the Antibalas horns and vocalist Alecia Chakour.The show opened up from one of the Capitol Theatre booths on the balcony, as the supergroup went into “Theme From The Last Waltz”. Highlights of the first set were “Up On Cripple Creek” led by Sam Cohen, “Life Is A Carnival” led by Craig Finn, “Georgia On My Mind” led by Alecia Chakour, “Ophelia” led by Scott Metzger, and “Such A Night” led by Marco Benevento. Wilco guitarist Nels Cline joined late in the first set to lead the band through two songs that Eric Clapton led at the infamous 1976 show, “All Our Past Times” and “Further Up On The Road”. Eric Johnson led on “Caravan” to bring the lengthy first set to a close.After a brief set break, The Complete Last Waltz house band returned and opened their second set with “Genetic Method”, before working through rocking takes on “Chest Fever”, “Evangeline”, “Acadian Driftwood”, and “The Weight”. Kevin Morby then joined to lead the group through “Baby Let Me Follow You Down”, “Hazel”, “I Don’t Believe You”, “Forever Young” a reprise of Baby Let Me Follow You Down”, and “I Shall Be Released”. “Don’t Do It” served as the evening’s encore, as vocalist Alecia Chakour reemerged to lead the all-star band through the favorite The Band tune.Luckily, there are a bunch of videos from The Complete Last Waltz that you can enjoy below:The Complete Last Waltz – “Such A Night”[Video: Jackalope]The Complete Last Waltz – “Don’t Do It”[Video: Jackalope]The Complete Last Waltz – “Don’t Do It”[Video: Jackalope]The Complete Last Waltz – “Coyote”[Video: monihampton]The Complete Last Waltz – “I Shall Be Released”[Video: monihampton]The Complete Last Waltz – “Such A Night”[Video: monihampton]The Complete Last Waltz – “The Last Waltz/Up On Cripple Creek”[Video: monihampton]The Complete Last Waltz – “Further On Up The Road”[Video: monihampton]The Complete Last Waltz – “All Our Past Times”[Video: monihampton]The Complete Last Waltz – “King Harvest”[Video: monihampton]Setlist: The Complete Last Waltz | Capitol Theatre | Port Chester, NY | 11/17/2018Set One: Theme From The Last Waltz, Up On Cripple Creek, The Shape I’m In, Life Is A Carnival, The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show, Georgia On My Mind, Ophelia, Rag Mama Rag, King Harvest (Has Surely Come), Mystery Train, Who Do You Love, The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, Stagefright, It Makes No Difference, Such A Night, Down South In New Orleans, This Wheel’s On Fire, All Our Past Times, Further On Up The Road, Four Strong Winds, Helpless, Coyote, Shadows And Light, Dry Your Eyes, Mannish Boy, Caldonia, Tura Lura Lural (That’s An Irish Lullaby), CaravanSet Two: Genetic Method/Chest Fever, Evangeline, Acadian Driftwood, The Weight, Baby Let Me Follow You Down > Hazel, I Don’t Believe You (She Acts Like We Never Have Met), Forever Young, Baby Let Me Follow You Down (Reprise), I Shall Be ReleasedEncore: Don’t Do Itlast_img read more

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The 1975 Salutes Talking Heads In New Video, “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)” [Watch]

first_imgFollowing the release of their new album on Friday, A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships, English pop band The 1975 has shared a new music video for their single “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)”.Directed by Warren Fu, the new music video sees The 1975 putting their own spin on footage from Jonathan Demme’s classic Talking Heads concert film Stop Making Sense. The new video opens up with lead singer Matt Healy sleeping backstage before a concert, followed by Healy coasting off into a dreamlike series of events. Clad in an oversized gray suit reminiscent of Talking Heads’ frontman David Byrne, Healy finds himself performing at a show in front of a house band, before he notices he’s missing his lips, and coasts back off into a dream. Healy’s pants blow up at one point, and the singer starts drowning in his oversized suit, as he continues to coast in and out of reality.Watch the new video for “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)” below:The 1975 – It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)[Video: The 1975]For more information on The 1975’s upcoming tour dates and new album, head to the band’s website here.last_img read more

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Seattle Post Office Renamed In Honor Of The Late Jimi Hendrix

first_imgJimi Hendrix was a man who needed no introduction–mostly due to the fact that he was talented enough to let his guitar do the talking for him. It’s that lasting musical legacy which has presumably inspired Washington state officials to green-light the official renaming of a Seattle-area post office in honor of the late guitarist, who died back in 1970 at the age of just 27.What was once registered as the Renton Highlands Post Office in the Seattle suburb of Renton, Washington, will now and hopefully forever be known as the James Marshall ‘Jimi’ Hendrix Post Office Building. The declaration was unanimously passed into state law from a bill co-sponsored by Rep. Adam Smith, D-Bellevue, and both of Washington’s U.S. senators in Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. It’s one of life’s great ironies when  governments which once despised a generational icon like Hendrix back in the late-1960’s, is now going out of its busy way to make sure he get’s his own post office. Then again, the man was known for his vibrant love of written correspondence and stamp collections… probably.Related: Someone Converted Jimi Hendrix’s Apartment Into The Hendrix MuseumThe guitarist grew up in the Seattle area, and is buried less than a mile from where his new Post Office stands at the Greenwood Memorial Park Cemetery. Although the guitarist was born and raised in the Seattle metropolitan area, it wasn’t until he relocated over to London’s mod-scene in the latter half of the 1960s when he began experiencing global success thanks to filmed appearances at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, and at Woodstock a few years later.“This designation will further celebrate Hendrix’s deep connection to the Puget Sound region and help ensure that his creative legacy will be remembered by our community and inspire future generations,” Rep. Smith said in a statement about the city’s latest tribute to Jimi.Back in June of 2017, a local park in Seattle’s Central District was opened to the public and dedicated in Jimi’s honor after year’s of planning and campaigning by The Jimi Hendrix Park Foundation.[H/T Seattle Times]last_img read more

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Bluegrass Generals Featuring Members Of The Infamous Stringdusters, Greensky Bluegrass, More Set Cervantes’ Ablaze [Photos]

first_imgLoad remaining images On Friday and Saturday, bluegrass all-star outfit the Bluegrass Generals offered up a two-night, sold-out weekend run at Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom in Denver, CO. The recent bluegrass extravaganza also included Andy Hall and Chris Pandolfi (The Infamous Stringdusters), Billy Strings, Mimi Naja (Fruition), Mike Devol (Greensky Bluegrass), and special guests. The Billy Failing Band offered support on Friday, featuring Todd Livingston, Silas Herman, and Eric Thorin.Led by Hall and Pandolfi, the Bluegrass Generals, along with their musical allies, “serve and protect the bluegrass people of Planet Earth.” Past guest generals include Sam Bush, Billy Nershi, Keith Mosley, Paul Hoffman, Larry Keel, and more.Check out a gallery of photos from Friday night’s show below courtesy of photographer Elliot Siff.Bluegrass Generals | Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom | Denver, CO | 4/26/2019 | Photos: Elliot Sifflast_img read more

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Dead & Company Debuts “High Time” In Celebratory Seasonal Show At Hollywood Bowl [Videos]

first_imgIt’s that time of year again: the Golden State Warriors are in the NBA Finals, and Dead & Company is performing at the Hollywood Bowl.It’s a fitting overlap given the Grateful Dead’s deep connections to basketball in the band’s native Bay Area and beyond. The Dead first formed in 1965, the same year the Warriors drafted the legendary Rick Barry. The Marin, California outfit came back from a nearly year-long hiatus in 1975, mere months after Barry led the Warriors to their first championship in Golden State.Over the years, the Dead’s hooks to hoops have been more than incidental. The band sponsored the Lithuanian men’s national basketball team, tie-dye shirts and all, during its run to the bronze medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. Nowadays, Bob Weir and Mickey Hart can often be seen at NBA playoff games—this year, in Portland and Oakland—sitting with Bill Walton, an avowed Deadhead since the Basketball Hall of Famer was a high school hoops star in San Diego.Related: Bob Weir, Jackie Greene Sing National Anthem Ahead Of Golden State Warriors NBA Playoff Game [Watch]Dead & Company bears its own parallels to the basketball world. This Dead iteration, featuring John Mayer on guitar and vocals and Oteil Burbridge (formerly of the Allman Brothers Band) on bass first formed in 2015, after the Dead played their “Fare Thee Well” shows with Phil Lesh, Phish’s Trey Anastasio and Bruce Hornsby in Santa Clara and Chicago—after the Warriors’ recent run of five straight Finals appearances first began. In 2017, Dead & Company played its first shows at the Hollywood Bowl, while Kevin Durant was en route to Finals MVP honors at the start of Golden State’s current push for a three-peat.Dead & Company know a thing or two about adding all-time talent like KD to their team. While Bobby, Mickey and Bill Kreutzmann will always be the OGs—the Dead’s equivalent of Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green—there’s no denying how gifted and fitting an addition John Mayer has been to this lineup.The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter, guitarist and producer (and youngest Dead man, by far, at 41) continued to invigorate the 54-year-old band with his soothing vocals and wailing guitar throughout a winding three-plus hour stroll down Shakedown Street in front of a packed house of 17,500. His axe work and his voice were particularly poignant during a stirring rendition of “Sugaree”, featuring a guitar solo that had the audience howling into the smoggy Los Angeles night.But John, of course, isn’t the only addition to the Dead who shined. Oteil Burbridge was once again brilliant on the bass, and showed off his smooth voice while singing the Dead & Company debut of “High Time”. Jeff Chimenti is far from a newcomer; he’s been playing with Bobby since RatDog in 1997 and has manned the keyboard with several other iterations of the Dead—including the Other Ones, Phil Leah and Friends and Furthur, and Fare Thee Well—over his two-plus decades in the GD universe. Still, he played with a quiet fire on the keys all across the setlist, with some standout ivory tickling on “Iko Iko” and “Not Fade Away”.All the while, the Dead’s OGs were every bit as reliable (if not spectacular in their own right) as their Golden State counterparts have been in these playoffs.Bobby sounded just as rejuvenated at the Bowl as he did during his last appearance in Southern California when he led the Wolf Bros in a headlining set at the inaugural BeachLife Festival in Redondo Beach. Mickey and Bill did their part to keep the beat and splash around during “Drums” and “Space” in the second set.Through it all, Bill Walton stood tall in the pit, and got supersized on the screens during “Franklin’s Tower” and an encore of “Terrapin Station”. Odds are, he will be back at the Bowl on Tuesday, as any dedicated Deadhead would be.Nor would it be all that surprising to see “Big Red” with the Dead on Wednesday, though it won’t be at a show that day. Instead, keep an eye out for Bobby, Mickey, and Walton at Game 3 of the 2019 Finals in Oakland before the band plays on through a three-night stint at the Gorge in Washington starting Thursday.Check out a few videos from the show below:Dead & Company – “Cold Rain and Snow” [Pro-Shot][Video: Dead & Company]Dead & Company – “High Time”[Video: Still Dead]Dead & Company – “Iko Iko” [Pro-Shot][Video: Dead & Company]Dead & Company – “Sugaree”[Video: Still Dead]Dead & Company – “Stella Blue”[Video: Still Dead]Dead & Company – “Lady With A Fan”/”Terrapin Station”[Video: Still Dead]For a full list of Dead & Company’s upcoming tour dates, head to their website here.Setlist: Dead & Company | Hollywood Bowl | Los Angeles, CA | 6/3/19Set One: Cold Rain And Snow, Hell In A Bucket, Easy Wind, Mississippi Half-Step, High Time, Jack Straw, Bird Song, Don’t Ease Me InSet Two: Iko Iko, New Speedway Boogie, Sugaree, Help On The Way > Slipknot! > Franklin’s Tower > Drums/Space > Stella Blue, Not Fade AwayEncore: Lady With A Fan > Terrapin Stationlast_img read more

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Tracking genetic traits over time

first_imgFossils may providetantalizing clues to human history, but they also lack some vital information,such as revealing which pieces of human DNA have been favored by evolutionbecause they confer beneficial traits — resistance to infection or the abilityto digest milk, for example. These signs can only be revealed through geneticstudies of modern humans and other related species, though the task has provendifficult. Now, in a paper appearing in today’s edition of Science Express, Harvard and Broad Institute researchersdescribe a method for pinpointing these preferred regions within the humangenome that offers greater precision and resolution than ever before, and thepossibility of deeply understanding both our genetic past and present. “It’s clear that positive natural selection has been a critical force inshaping the human genome, but there are remarkably few examples that have beenclearly identified,” said senior author Pardis Sabeti, an associate memberof the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and an assistant professor of in Harvard’s department of organismic and evolutionary biology. “The methodwe’ve developed makes it possible to zero in on individual genes as well as thespecific changes within them that are driving important evolutionarychanges.”Positive natural selection is a process in which advantageous traits becomemore common in a population. That is because these traits boost an individual’schances of survival and reproduction, so they are readily passed on to futuregenerations. Identifying such traits — and the genes underlying them — is acornerstone of current efforts to dissect the biological history of the humanspecies as well as the diseases that threaten human health today. “In the human genome, positive natural selection leaves behind verydistinctive signals,” said co-first author Sharon Grossman, a researchassistant at Harvard’s FAS Center for Systems Biology and at the Broad Institute. Yet earlier methodsfor detecting these signals are limited, highlighting relatively large chunksof the genome that are hundreds of thousands to millions of genetic letters or“bases” in length, and that can contain many genes. Of the hundreds of these large genomic regions thought to be under positivenatural selection in humans, only a handful have so far been winnowed to aprecise genetic change.  “Finding the specific genetic changes that are under selection can be likelooking for a needle in a haystack,” said Grossman. Sabeti, Grossman, and their colleagues wondered if there might be a way toenhance this genomic search. Because existing methods for detecting naturalselection individually measure distinct genomic features, the researcherspredicted that an approach that combines them could yield even better results. After some initial simulations to test their new method, the research teamapplied it to more than 180 regions of the human genome that are thought to beunder recent positive selection, yet, in most cases, the specific gene orgenetic variant under selection is unknown. The researchers’ method, called “Composite of Multiple Signals” orCMS, enabled them to dramatically narrow the size of the candidate regions,reducing them from an average of eight genes per region to one. Moreover thenumber of candidate genetic changes was reduced from thousands to just a handful,helping the researchers to tease out the needles from the haystack. “The list of genes and genetic loci we identified includes many intriguingcandidates to follow up,” said co-first author Ilya Shlyakhter, acomputational biologist in Harvard’s department of organismic and evolutionary biology and at the Broad Institute.“For example, a number of genes identified are involved in metabolism,skin pigmentation, and the immune system.” In some cases, the researchers were able to identify a specific genetic changethat is the likely focal point of natural selection. For example, a variationin a gene called protocadherin 15, which functions in sensory perception,including hearing and vision, appears to be under selection in some East Asianpopulations. Several other genes involved in sensory perception also appear tobe under selection in Asia. In addition, the team uncovered strong evidence ofselection in East Asians at a specific point within the leptin receptor gene,which is linked to blood pressure, body mass index, and other important metabolicfunctions. The researchers also localized signals to regions outside of genes, suggestingthat they function not by altering gene structure per se, but by changing how certain genes are turned on and off. While the findings in the Science paper offer a deep glimpse of evolution’shandiwork, the researchers emphasize that further studies of individual geneticvariations, involving experiments that explore how certain genetic changesinfluence biological function, are necessary to fully dissect the role ofnatural selection and its impact on human biology. “This method allows us to trace evolution’s footprints with a much finerlevel of granularity than before, but it’s one piece of a much largerpuzzle,” said Sabeti. “As more data on human genetic variationbecomes available in the coming years, an even more detailed evolutionarypicture should emerge.”last_img read more

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