Russia lays keel for fifth Project 12700 minesweeper

first_img Russia’s Sredne-Nevsky Shipyard held a keel-laying ceremony for the Russian Navy’s fifth Project 12700 minesweeper at its shipyard in St. Petersburg on December 26.By order of the Russian Navy chief Admiral Vladimir Korolev, the ship was named after the Soviet Union hero Yakov Balyayev.The vessel is scheduled to be launched and handed over to the fleet in 2019.The lead ship in this class of minesweepers, the ‘Alexander Obukhov’, has already entered service while the three following ships ‘George Kurbatov, ‘Ivan Antonov’ and ‘Vladimir Emelyanov’ are at different stages of construction.Project 12700 minesweepers have the largest fiberglass body in the world, according to the Russian defense ministry. A monolithic-fiberglass hull provides for greater survivability during mine countermeasure operations and weighs less than a low-magnetic steel hull.The ships displace 620 tons and measure 61 meters in length.Russia plans to build a total of 40 vessels in the class.Aleksandrit-class minesweeper Alexander Obukhov at sea. Photo: Sredne-Nevsky Shipyard View post tag: Russian Navy View post tag: Project 12700 December 27, 2017 Vessels View post tag: Sredne-Nevskiy Shipyard Share this article Russia lays keel for fifth Project 12700 minesweeper Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia lays keel for fifth Project 12700 minesweeper last_img read more

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National Junior Honor Society Induction Recognizes Ocean City Students

first_imgThe 7th and 8th grade classes face their parents to thank them for their support. Some of the best and brightest students of the Ocean City Intermediate School were honored Monday night with their induction into the school’s chapter of the National Junior Honor Society.The induction took place before a large audience of students, faculty, staff, and parents, family and friends of the new NHS members.The induction ceremony opened with a flag salute led by Chad Callahan, speeches by Carlee Parker, Nya Gilchrist, Luke Gallagher, Katie Bowman, Mark Faverzani, Viva Hulhall, and Sarah Huber.A candle lighting was conducted by Joni Dice, Max Fisher, Sofia Kier, Skye Carlin, and Paige Panico.All of the new inductees recited the NHS Pledge. Mrs. Morris received a special recognition award.8th Grade MembersCaroline Adair           Gabriel DoughtyRobin Altman                Milica DukovaAlexandra Antonov                Jake ElkoNicholas Bell               Mark FaverzaniJordan Berry              Nicholas FerzettiKatie Bowman               Maxwell FisherChad Callahan              Luke GallagherSkye Carlin                  Sophie GartnerGiovanna Dattilo               Nya GilchristMorgan Decosta              Grace GleasonJoni Dice                  Jenevieva MulhallPaige Dooley                 Katelyn MullerSadie Godfrey                Isabella PadulaJohn Horner                     Paige PanicoSarah Huber                   Carlee ParkerMichael Jacobsen             Jacob PatellaConnor James                   Lauren RoopSofia Keir                    Sydney RossiterHannah Martin                   Sophia RuhHannah McDowell        Jacob SchneiderAllie McEntee                 Dominic SessaJulia McKeon                  Chelsea StackMadison MorganErik WagnerGrace Wiley7th Grade MembersAndrew Allegretto        Alexis Hart              Chanon StyerNatalie Argento            Kiera Janto              Allie SutterCaeli Barbour               Olivia Kemenosh      Lilly TeoffanovaMorgan Beckman          Kierstyn Kuhnele     Grace ThompsonZoe Bourgeois              Katie Laursen          Sophia TuckerNigel Collins                 Abby Laursen         Olivia VaneskoDillon Conner               Aria Lindberg          Sarah VaralloJames Craver               Riley Madden          Brian WangLiam Cupit                  Madison Majors        Samuel WilliamsEdward D’Amico           Ella Marinucci          Marietta YoungZachary DeGennaro      Maria Mastrando      Cole YoungShea DeMarco                                               Brett OvesElizabeth Drain                                            Julia QuintinDaniel Givens                                     Summerlee ReimetSarah Gleason                                            Jack RodgersNoelle Graham                                       Sarah RodriguezSpecial Thanks to…Dr. Taylor, Mr. Haines,Mrs. Dubs & Mrs. BrownOCIS Custodial StaffAdvisors: Mrs. Morris & Mrs. LantermanTeachers who volunteered to sponsor our 7th gradersMrs. Duffey        Mrs. SkulskyMr. Lane             Mr. ButterickMr. Nunan           Ms. TribulskiMrs. Tornblom         Ms. BrownMrs. Kriegner        Mr. BarbatoMs. Weaver            Mrs. RoweOC Parent Teacher AssociationIce Cream Social VolunteersKohr Bros. Frozen Custard– 8th Grade AwardsDenise Callahan & Ocean Treasures -ShirtsGoofy Golf, Pisa Pizza, Chickey & Pete’s, Kohr Bros—Field trip sponsorslast_img read more

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The heat is on

first_imgWhat is the difference between a toasted sandwich sold by Subway and one sold by Quiznos? Answer: 17.5% VAT, soon to go up to 20%. Why? because HMRC treats one as hot food and not the other.It is all to do with the legal definition of hot food for the purposes of VAT. The law makes suppliers of hot food subject to VAT. But to be classed as hot food, the food must have been heated for the dominant purposes of hot consumption. In other words, if the food was heated for some other purpose, it may be zero-rated for VAT. The trouble lies in establishing the purpose.In the case of Quiznos, a tax tribunal found that the dominant application of heat was to toast the sandwich, but for Subway, the tribunal found that the same process had a dominant purpose of making the food hot for consumption and the toasting was not the dominant element.In the past, the VAT tribunal has found that the dominant purpose in applying heat to hot meat pies (Pimblett) and Cornish pasties is to finish the baking process, the same is true of hot ciabatta melts (Ainsleys) and panini (Warren), to name but a few zero-rated items. On the other hand, freshly baked pizza is taxed.So how do you go about deciding which rate of tax is correct for your product? By checking the temperature. Did you know that the law regards something as hot if it is above ambient air temperature? This means that, on a cold day, lots of things could be regarded as hot even if your customer would regard them as cold. Subway’s toasted sandwiches were found by the tribunal to be lukewarm, but this made them above ambient air temperature.The other feature is that, if any part of a product is above ambient air temperature, the whole of the product is treated as hot. So lukewarm toast containing cold salad may be classed as hot.Once you have a temperature reading that is anything over ambient air temperature, you must then ask yourself your purpose in heating it. Is your purpose to complete a baking or similar process, or is it so that an item can be intentionally eaten hot by your customer? This bit sounds simple, but in practice, it is a difficult question. Recently, the tribunal has set about analysing intention in evermore complex ways for instance wishing to see franchise agreements of food outlets, operational manuals and advertising materials. The tribunal may attach great significance to a picture of a product showing steam rising from it, for example.The HMRC viewHMRC does offer guidance in its public notices, which are available online and you may wish to speak to them about this. But remember, HMRC is a tax collector and the number of tribunal cases it has lost shows that it is in the habit of ruling that hot food should be subject to VAT where it should not have done. So bakers need to think very carefully about a product before taking the matter to HMRC.Also, be prepared for HMRC to come to you and find products currently free of VAT to be reconsidered. In such cases, it is normal for HMRC to issue a back-dated assessment and charge interest, even where the tax was not collected. Sometimes, reconsidering the dominant purpose for heating may lead to a back-claim to HMRC for overpaid VAT, where VAT has been charged by mistake.But where agreement cannot be reached, appeals against HMRC decisions are taken to the first-tier tribunal tax chamber, a specialist court designated to deal with tax issues. HMRC has solicitors to deal with these issues, who normally instruct a specialist tax barrister to represent them. Although this sounds daunting, with careful preparation, a tribunal appeal can run smoothly. Even if the taxpayer loses the appeal, HMRC will not seek to recover its legal costs unless the appeal was frivolous or vexatious or there had been an agreement on costs at the onset. Each case must be looked at on its own merits.l Dipak Jotangia is an expert in tax, fraud and regulatory work at Dass Solicitorslast_img read more

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The 1975 Salutes Talking Heads In New Video, “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)” [Watch]

first_imgFollowing the release of their new album on Friday, A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships, English pop band The 1975 has shared a new music video for their single “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)”.Directed by Warren Fu, the new music video sees The 1975 putting their own spin on footage from Jonathan Demme’s classic Talking Heads concert film Stop Making Sense. The new video opens up with lead singer Matt Healy sleeping backstage before a concert, followed by Healy coasting off into a dreamlike series of events. Clad in an oversized gray suit reminiscent of Talking Heads’ frontman David Byrne, Healy finds himself performing at a show in front of a house band, before he notices he’s missing his lips, and coasts back off into a dream. Healy’s pants blow up at one point, and the singer starts drowning in his oversized suit, as he continues to coast in and out of reality.Watch the new video for “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)” below:The 1975 – It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)[Video: The 1975]For more information on The 1975’s upcoming tour dates and new album, head to the band’s website here.last_img read more

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Continuing the legacy: Alyson Gombas

first_imgShe was a force of nature, a loyal and caring friend, a tireless advocate for women’s and girls’ education, and an international worker in multiple countries. And when Laura Kavazanjian, Ed.M.’10, was killed in a car accident in 2011, her HGSE classmates and friends wanted to find a way to carry on both her name and her work.“I had never met anyone so determined to make a difference in the world,” says Catie Corbin, Ed.M. ’10, a classmate and close friend of Kavazanjian’s. “Apart from being brilliant, Laura was able to engage people with stories around why education professionals needed to prioritize girls’ education. Because of her conviction and her passion, she gained a series of followers.”In the fall of 2013, the Laura Kavazanjian Memorial Scholarship Fund awarded funds to Gombas, a student in the IEP Program whose passion aligns closely with Kavazanjian’s. A former Peace Corps member and Fulbright scholar, Gombas has worked and taught English in India, Turkey, and Kyrgyzstan. She came to HGSE to learn more about the policies affecting international education and the questions surrounding access to education for women and girls — just as Laura did.Gombas is now stepping into a legacy of activism for the education of women and girls. The scholarship will be awarded annually to an HGSE student with an interest in international education, particularly in improving female access to education. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Return to Grace

first_imgIn the midst of a surprising undefeated football season and Notre Dame’s rise to the No. 1 spot atop the national college football polls this weekend, hopeful Irish fans continue to draw parallels between 2012 and 1988, the last time the team won a national championship. But when it comes to lighting the No. 1 sign atop Grace Hall, that parallel is not merely speculative. Design professor Robert Sedlack was a resident assistant in Grace during his senior year and the 1988 football season, and he played a crucial role in making the Irish’s No. 1 ranking known to all of campus. “It just so happened that I was an RA on the 11th floor of Grace and had the keys to the penthouse,” he said. “So lighting the sign fell on my to-do list, and I had to go up in the morning and the evening to turn it off and on each day.” Sedlack began his lighting duties after the then-No. 2 Irish jumped ahead of then-No. 1 UCLA following a 22-7 victory against Navy and the Bruins’ upset loss to Washington State. He said he and his friends began preparing to celebrate that change shortly after it happened. “Once it looked like we were going to achieve that No. 1 ranking, some buddies of mine built the sign out on the roof of Grace,” Sedlack said. They took a page out of the book of Fr. Gerry Lardner, Grace Hall’s rector at the time and a Notre Dame graduate student during the team’s 1973 championship season. The tradition of the No. 1 sign began after that season, when it was initially placed outside Moreau Seminary, University Architect Doug Marsh said. “Fr. Gerry was a great rector and we had a good group of RAs that year, so he wanted to kind of redo [the sign] and so the guys rebuilt it,” Sedlack said. But the relighting of the sign came as something of a surprise after the first three mediocre seasons Sedlack and his 1989 classmates experienced. “Our freshman year was so awful … a guy once offered my roommate $10 for a pair of tickets he tried to sell for the last game of the season,” Sedlack said. “You fast forward to senior year, and tickets for the Miami-Notre Dame game at home were going for $1,000 each.” Between his freshman and senior years, Sedlack saw receiver Tim Brown win the Heisman Trophy his junior year and leave the team somewhat in limbo when he graduated. “I think we thought we’d be OK [without Brown], but I don’t think anybody thought we’d be the best in the country,” Sedlack said. “You could make the argument that my classmates and I were at Notre Dame during the best years for Notre Dame football,” he said. “Our claim is that you can’t understand how incredible it is to win a national championship having not had a crappy freshman year.” Sedlack said he feels this year’s team has followed a similar trajectory in its long-awaited return to national prominence. “We were awful three years ago, so to suddenly have such a great team is exciting,” he said. “I’m really thrilled, most thrilled for the team.” Sedlack said he still takes pride in his former duty as an RA, bringing his wife and children to take pictures on Mod Quad, telling students about his experiences and sharing photos and emails with classmates. “I feel proud to be associated with [lighting the sign],” Sedlack said. “Grace was a fantastic dorm with a good crew of RAs, and we got along well with our rector. Not unlike this year, it was a magical season.” Marsh said the 8-foot-tall sign atop Grace now remains lit so long as any Irish sports team is ranked No. 1 in the nation. Prior to its lighting Sunday, the sign was most recently lit for the University’s fencing, women’s basketball and women’s soccer teams. The last time it was lit in honor of the football team was in 1993, when the Irish topped the Associated Press poll. Contact Kristen Durbin at [email protected]last_img read more

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Call for new judges comes up short in special session

first_img January 1, 2005 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Call for new judges comes up short in special session The effort will be renewed when legislators reconvene in March Associate Editor A bill touted as a first step toward delivering desperately needed new trial judges unanimously passed the House Fiscal Council December 16, but went nowhere in the special session when it did not get an audience in the Senate.HB 23A, filed by Rep. Bruce Kyle, R-Ft. Myers, would have created 20 new judges — only a fraction of the 110 judges the Supreme Court has certified as critically needed in Florida’s trial courts — and Kyle vowed to push for more judges during the regular session that begins March 8.Kyle’s proposal calls for an additional judge for each circuit, except the 12th and 17th, and a pair of county judges, one for Collier and one for Martin.But on the special session’s final day, Senate President Tom Lee, R-Brandon, indicated he did not view the situation as a big enough emergency to expand the call of the special session on pre-kindergarten, but promised to address the need for judges during the regular session.“It is a sleeping giant. At least, in the House, it has gotten up,” said Kyle, who said he has at least 76 sponsors on the bill.“I think people finally realize there is a need out there. I am confident, at least out of the House, there will be more judges in the regular session.. . . The resounding theme, as I was getting signatures, was that everyone anticipates doing more judges in the regular session. And I do, too.”Kyle, a prosecutor and chair of the House Justice Council, said he filed the bill — with the support of House Speaker Allan Bense, R-Panama City, and with help from Rep. Jack Seiler, D-Pompano Beach, and Rep. Dan Gelber, D-Miami Beach — “because we haven’t had any new judges since 2002. The Supreme Court certified 110 new judges, and so there is a definite need.”At the Fiscal Council meeting, Rep. Curtis Richardson, D-Tallahassee, asked, “Does this have the support of the chief justice of the Supreme Court?”Kyle responded: “I talked personally, before I filed the bill, with the chief justice at length. And she is supportive of any new judges that we could get, because there has been a long, outstanding need.”Every circuit that was certified for additional judges by the Supreme Court, Kyle explained, would get at least one circuit court judge, according to his revised bill. The original version of his bill called for 14 additional judges, which he explained was arrived at by “the ones we had actually done in 2002, subtracted from the certification of 2001. Those 14 were the most outstanding.. . . that need has been there for closing in on five years. This is a member-driven process. There is a lot of need throughout the state.”Kyle’s bill would make the new judgeships effective March 1, but he wants the enacting dates spread out in July and January.“That is good for the Governor’s Office, as well, because it lessens the workload. When you’ve got 110, if you do them all at one time, that’s a lot of interviews,” Kyle said referring to the number of names sent to the judicial nominating commissions for consideration.“Some circuits are certified for seven new judges, and I think you’ll get a better quality of applicants, too, by spreading it out, rather than jamming it up all at once.”The proposal for 20 additional judges and support personnel came with an annual price tag of $5.1 million. Call for new judges comes up short in special sessionlast_img read more

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New Revelations in Nassau County Police Department Conspiracy Case

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York On May 19, 2009, Nassau County’s Seventh Police Precinct received a report of a break in at John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore. More than $3,000 worth of electronic equipment was stolen from its auditorium.The case appeared open-and-shut: Surveillance video caught a student near the auditorium afterhours during the exact time of the theft. School employees reported witnessing the same student attempting to gain access to a restricted area at the school. An acquaintance of the student surrendered some of the stolen goods to the police, telling authorities his friend had given them to him.Yet despite the compelling evidence, three independent sources within the Nassau County Police Department with privileged knowledge of the case’s inner details—who spoke with the Press on the condition of anonymity because they are barred from commenting on ongoing investigations—tell the Press the student, though identified, was never arrested. His father is a business associate of a little-known nonprofit organization called the Nassau County Police Department Foundation.It’s no coincidence, the Press has learned. Internal police documents reviewed by the Press and interviews with more than a dozen current and former active and retired police officers, detectives and senior Nassau police officials outline a program that could reward the group’s members through preferential treatment that experts classify as questionable and unethical at best; pushing the limits of the very laws they were sworn to enforce at worst.That was the lede of the Press’ March 31, 2011 cover story “Membership Has Its Privileges: Is the NCPD Selling Preferential Treatment?”Without naming Nassau County Police Department (NCPD) benefactor Gary Parker or his son Zachary, the story detailed how the felony investigation into thefts at the school perpetrated by the latter was quashed, allegedly due to his father’s cozy relationship with members of the department’s top brass.The March 31, 2011 Press cover story “Membership Has Its Privileges” sparked an investigation by the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office the resulted in the felony conviction of Zachary Parker and the indictments of three ex-top cops.The article sparked a criminal investigation into the thefts by the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office, which resulted in grand jury indictments against the younger Parker on three felony counts in Oct. 2011: burglary, grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property. He pled guilty to the burglary and was ordered to pay nearly $4,000 for equipment never returned.It also sparked a criminal investigation that resulted in a 10-count indictment naming NCPD’s third-highest-ranking official, former Second Deputy Commissioner William Flanagan, along with retired Det. Sgt. Alan Sharpe and former Deputy Chief of Patrol John Hunter on conspiracy and official misconduct charges. Flanagan was additionally charged with receiving reward for official misconduct in the second degree, a felony. Sharpe was additionally charged with offering a false instrument for filing. They all face prison terms if convicted.Flanagan and Hunter retired less than 24 hours of turning themselves in to investigators shortly after sunrise on March 1, 2012; Sharpe had retired less than two months prior. Collectively their annual salaries totaled more than $540,000; their pensions remain intact despite the charges.Flanagan, Hunter and Sharpe’s defense attorneys—Bruce A. Barket, William Petrillo and Anthony Grandinette, respectively—have contended their clients have done nothing wrong and a judge has granted them separate trials.Flanagan told reporters the courtesies given to his friend Gary’s family were the same he’d afford any other member of the public. His trial began Jan. 15.News of the indictments has been covered by nearly every media outlet in the region. The allegations strike at the heart of what public law enforcement servants are mandated and take an oath to do: serve and protect the citizenry and enforce its laws.“[Flanagan] violated his oath to uphold the laws of the State of New York,” Assistant District Attorney Cristiana McSloy told jurors in her opening statement, adding that Gary Parker “literally bought access to the police department” with dinners, sporting events and other gifts.What hasn’t been fully reported, however, are the complete details of what exactly went on behind the closed doors of Nassau County’s Finest in the hours, days and months following the May 18, 2009 break-in—and why despite the surveillance footage, admission by the perpetrator’s parents of their son’s thefts and a signed statement from the school’s principal calling for the student’s arrest, he remained free until our story.The latest trial testimony fills in many of those blanks, along with providing new details and insights into the motives of the three former police officials and the culture existing within the department that enabled such events to transpire in the first place. It also raises more questions concerning the involvement other department higher-ups may have had in the alleged cover-up.We now know, for example, that after reading the Press story, Gary Parker “panicked” and began deleting the many emails he had with Flanagan. Prosecutors contend the then-top cop did the same, and in those correspondences, he referred to Parker as “family.” We also know a bit more about the lavish dinners enjoyed by Nassau police’s top brass at top restaurants across Long Island and Manhattan, compliments of Parker, who testified the bills ranged from the hundreds to more than $1,200 each and were attended by not only Flanagan and Hunter, but also former Nassau Police Commissioner Lawrence Mulvey, and on at least one occasion, popular Fox News Channel cable TV host Bill O’Reilly. We also have, again from the mouth of Parker himself, descriptions of the police identification cards and “gold” badges doled out to foundation members—still a bone of contention with Nassau Police Benevolent Association President James Carver.“When our guys pull over someone and they pull out an ID issued from one of these organizations they take a step back and don’t want to get themselves into any type of discipline,” he says. “They are afraid of taking some kind of action.”“They shouldn’t have the shields,” blasts Carver. “That is the bottom line. If are doing it for the good of their heart, there is really no reason to issue somebody a shield, bottom line.”Nassau Assistant District AttorneyCristiana McSloy, in her opening statement atformer Nassau Second Deputy CommissionerWilliam Flanagan’s conspiracy trial Jan. 15Regardless of what the jury finds, a Press examination of these latest revelations, court filings, recovered email correspondence between Gary Parker and the trio cited in the indictments and read aloud in court, police records, interviews with more than a dozen current and former NCPD officials, prosecutors, defense attorneys and reporting by this publication and others together paint, at the minimum, an indisputable portrait of how sworn members of the agency charged with protecting its citizenry and upholding its laws did everything in their power to protect and serve the interests of this wealthy police benefactor and friend.Flanagan and Barket aren’t necessarily denying this, but arguing that all they were doing was returning stolen property to a crime victim, which they say is a core part of the police’s job. The gifts were coincidental, they contend. Prosecutors believe those actions (and inactions, namely the non-arrest of Zachary Parker) were criminal.Our analysis identifies several key details jurors unfortunately won’t get to hear while weighing their decision, including profound discrepancies between prior statements of the defense, witness testimony and documented facts within the paper trail. So too does it uncover continued lapses in transparency regarding the public/private partnership that is the nonprofit police foundation.The public would not know about any of these things, however, were it not for the unfortunate misdeeds of Zachary Parker—or our disclosure of a March 2010 internal police department-wide memo stating foundation members were to be treated differently should police personnel come across them during their regular duties.Though prosecutors recently informed jurors Zachary Parker wouldn’t be testifying (he’s currently incarcerated at Lakeview Shock Incarceration in Brocton, NY following a slew of additional criminal charges, some still pending, since his burglary bust), his significance was not lost on the proceedings.“You’re not going to see him in the courtroom, but his presence is everywhere,” said Nassau County Assistant District Attorney Cristiana McSloy.Who was this troubled young man? Why didn’t the police ever arrest him? And just how high up does this scandal reach?NABBED: Zachary Parker (L), whose father’s relationship with former top members of the Nassau County Police Department are at the heart of an ongoing conspiracy trial, shuns reporters as he departs Nassau County Court. He pleaded guilty to burglarizing JFK High School after a Press article sparked his arrest. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)CAUGHT ON TAPEWhen JFK High School Principal Lorraine Poppe learned the school’s projector was missing May 19, 2009, she believed she knew exactly who’d taken it: Zachary Parker, a senior at the time who had already been banned from school grounds without supervision afterhours due to several prior incidents regarding missing equipment.When she gave a statement to Nassau’s Seventh Precinct to report its theft, she told Police Officer Samantha Sullivan as much. Sullivan initially jotted down Parker’s name on the ensuing police report then crossed it off because she wanted to keep the document objective for the investigating detectives, she testified. Additionally, a custodian saw Zachary in the area “trying to gain access to the area where the projector was being used,” she added.JFK’s former assistant principal William Brennen testified he saw Parker on school surveillance video afterhours while he was banned “carrying a satchel containing something of a relative size to a projector.”Brennen, who was in the school’s coaches’ offices the night of the projector theft, said those surveillance cameras were installed because of the prior thefts. He also saw Parker’s car in the back of the school and watched him enter through its gym entrance doors facing the football field. Brennen waited for Parker to exit the same doors after trying to keep an eye on him from afar, but Parker exited another set of doors unexpectedly, though was still caught on camera.Jonathan Dell’Olio, dean of students, a coach, and 15-year English teacher at the school, testified that he had taken Parker under his wing and that “Zach and I knew each other well.”He described Parker as “an integral part of setting up and breaking down school events.”Zachary Parker (Broward County Sheriff’s Dept.)“[Zachary] earned the trust of the custodial staff, the athletic coordinator…he would be allowed to go fetch things that would be necessary to make the production work” until Brennen informed him of the afterhours ban, said Dell’Olio. “Zach was apart of most conversations dealing with technology because he was very good at it” and in turn knew where the cameras were placed after the thefts started—all outside, none inside, but with “some dead areas.”The night of the theft he heard a custodian over Walkie-Talkies asking to allow “Zach” to the second floor and spied from afar, the dean continued. “I wanted to see what Zach was up to without him noticing me,” he said. After seeing Parker with a backpack walking toward the auditorium, he tried to intercept him, but he’d gone out a side exit. The next morning at 7:30 a.m., Brennen was in his office with IT aide Donna Hanna, who said the projector was missing. He told her about Parker’s visit the night before, informed Poppe and “then we went to the videotape.”The police never viewed nor asked to view the surveillance tape, nor interview the eyewitness school personnel.Parker, 18 years old at the time of the May 2009 break-in, had made no secret of his desire for expensive new sound equipment to add to his DJ rig. It was, in fact, evident to anyone who’d ever viewed his MySpace profile page, where Parker stated under his moniker “DJZeeMac” that he’d started spinning at camp in 2004, DJed sports events for JFK High School and boasted that he “was just recently employed by Nassau County Section 8 Sports to DJ all their postseason sporting events.”“On my wish list as of now are a set of Mackie speakers, Xone 92 mixer, Denon CD deck, and the PCDJ DAC-3 controller (and flight case for it all to go into), all which’ll probably total up to about $2g’s,” he wrote.Three days after the May 18 burglary, Zachary showed up at his friend Lothar Keller’s apartment in Franklin Square—his then-girlfriend also lived there. Earlier that month Parker had brought Keller a Dell laptop that he sold for $350. This time, Parker brought three more laptops and a projector.“He just slapped ’em down on the table and said, ‘Look what I have,’” Keller told jurors.The 24-year-old self-professed “gutterman” testified that later that day, while driving Zachary around, his father, Gary, called his son and was “bugging out on him,” so he dropped Zachary off at home. On the way back to his apartment, Keller got a call on his cell phone from “Dr. Jones”—Zachary Parker’s nickname. But it was Gary Parker on the other end.Gary, partner at Manhattan-based Spielman Koenigsberg & Parker LLP Certified Public Accountants and an avid boater, states his company bio, was “a bit of a police buff,” according to ADA McSloy. He testified Jan. 29 that he’d been involved in police benevolence activities since the late 1980s, early 1990s, helping obtain nonprofit status for the Police Foundation of Nassau County—a group that had its nonprofit status revoked for failure to file required tax documents with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and was separate from the Nassau County Police Department Foundation, former Commissioner Mulvey’s brainchild.The elder Parker wined and dined Flanagan, Hunter and other Nassau police brass with “lunches and dinners”—totaling more than $17,000, according to a source close to the District Attorney’s Office investigation—and other gifts, charge court documents. He testified Jan. 28 about the meals—ranging from seafood and pasta smorgasbords at Uncle Bacala’s in New Hyde Park to top cuts of sirloin at Morton’s in Great Neck and Manhattan’s upscale Sparks Steak House—yet couldn’t recall who exactly attended a slew of feasts at Bacala’s. Flanagan, Hunter and Mulvey also attended barbeques at his house, he testified.“He was screaming at me that I was in possession of stolen property, that I would be hearing from the police,” Keller said of his friend’s dad.After he hung up, Keller called the person he’d sold the Dell laptop to, and then called the police, he testified, telling jurors he went to the Fifth Precinct with all the gear Zachary had given him to try and avoid “getting in trouble.” The clerk looked baffled when Keller told her it was all stolen property, he said, and was then interviewed by an officer.“I told him that I had gotten all of these electronics from this kid Zachary Parker,” he said. “I didn’t want any part of it.” Keller signed a sworn statement and went home.It wasn’t the last time his association with Parker would bring him trouble with the law, Keller testified.Later that summer, Keller was cruising along in Parker’s car after they’d just finished smoking marijuana when a state trooper stopped them for speeding on Ocean Parkway.Keller swallowed the remainder of their joint as the trooper approached, but testified that he and his friend ultimately had nothing to fear, because when Parker pulled out his license, the cop saw his “gold” badge in his wallet and said, “Have a good day.”Zachary Parker had a history of getting out of trouble that any other person would not, court documents, deleted emails and testimony reveal.Former Nassau County Police Department Second Deputy Commissioner William Flanagan surrendered to the Nassau District Attorney’s Office March 1, 2012 to face conspiracy and official misconduct charges stemming from his alleged involvement in quashing the arrest of a police benefactor’s son.PAPER TRAILHunter, formerly the commander of the Highway Patrol Bureau and a close personal friend of Zachary’s father Gary, was “instrumental” in getting him out of multiple moving violations, state court documents—evident by the fact his license plate had been run by police at least 20 times yet he never received a citation, according to law enforcement sources close to the case.He was also instrumental, say court filings, in getting Zachary a job within the police department in its Emergency Ambulance Bureau, a position created solely for him. Parker was 16 when he was hired by the NCPD.Gary Parker testified that in August 2008 he and Hunter spoke about somehow getting Zachary a uniform. Parker’s hire had to be signed off by the NCPD, Nassau’s Office of Management and Budget and the County Executive’s office, according to the police department’s head of public information, Inspector Kenneth Lack. Parker further testified he reached out to another friend—the husband of Mulvey’s secretary—to help land his son the job.“I asked a friend of mine…to help get my son a job’ with Nassau County Police Department,” he said. “I wanted him to get a part-time job…he wanted to become an EMT, it’s an area he likes and I thought it would be good experience.”“He was a friend,” Parker testified, of Hunter.Hunter helped get Zachary a ride-a-long, Gary testified, and the pair’s friendship was so strong, contends court documents, that Hunter even provided Parker with a police generator during a blackout.It’s no surprise then, that when Hunter—who Gary Parker acknowledged to prosecutors attended annual barbeques at the Parker home and dinners at restaurants on Gary’s dime—learned of the complaint regarding Zachary, broke the normal chain of command for such investigations and inserted himself into the matter to prevent arrest, contends McSloy.Since Zachary was a department employee, when the commander of the Seventh Precinct Detective Squad received the initial report from Poppe, the head of the squad, in accordance with proper protocol, referred the matter to the NCPD Internal Affairs Unit (IAU).Yet “within a day,” Hunter, who was not in the detective squad chain of command, “called the squad commander to let her know that IAU would not be investigating the matter despite the suspect’s employment with the department,” say the filings, despite having “no supervisory authority over either the squad or IAU.” Hunter also requested “that he be kept informed of the status of the felony investigation,” contend prosecutors.The police commissioner is routinely briefed by internal affairs, according to Lack, who was also named by Parker as an attendee at a $2,346.47 feast at Spark’s, alongside Flanagan, Mulvey and others.On May 22, Gary received a call and invitation from Sharpe to come to the Seventh Precinct and talk about his son, he testified. Sharpe showed him the equipment dropped off by Keller and informed him his son was a suspect—one computer actually having “ZeeMac” scrawled across it in marker. Parker admitted his son’s guilt, he said, and name-dropped a few people he knew at NCPD, though told the jury he didn’t recall who he mentioned.Sharpe didn’t take an official statement nor voucher the stolen merchandise, which is typical police procedure in any investigation, and instead suggested Parker visit Poppe. (Sharpe’s also accused of entering the department’s computer system and falsely stating that Poppe did not want Zachary arrested for the thefts.)“I told [Gary] that I was disappointed in his son,” testified the principal. “I told him the plan was to have Zachary arrested.”She also told him Zachary would be suspended, banned from attending the prom, senior events and graduation. The next day, Parker asked Hunter to meet at Colony Diner in East Meadow and returned his son’s NCPD identification and uniform.Parker told Hunter he was trying to work with the school, he testified, and “in passing” told him to “put in a good word” with Sharpe. They hugged each other before leaving.Later that week Parker bought his son a same-day ticket to visit his grandparents in Florida and Hunter, in a recovered email, wrote him “Anything I can do to help, let me know.”Gary, in another deleted emailed to Hunter at the end of the month, requested the squad “lay low,” states the documents, to which the deputy chief assured him he would “make sure that is done” and then made arrangements to return the property to the school.“Thank you for being a great person and friend,” replied Parker.“[A]s you taught me that is what friends are for!” answered Hunter.Hunter also reached out to a nephew of Poppe’s who was a NCPD canine officer and asked he help get the principal to drop the charges. He refused.So did Poppe, multiple times, despite not only repeated attempts through May and June by police detectives directed by Hunter and Sharpe to have her sign a withdrawal of prosecution form, emails, court filings and testimony show—but also an intimidating visit at 1 a.m. by one of Barket’s investigators, a tidbit Barket convinced the judge not to allow jurors to hear.“We wanted to have Zachary arrested,” she told jurors Jan. 22, noting that the detectives who repeatedly tried to get her to withdraw charges “never asked me for a copy of the video.”Parker then reached out to another friend, then-sergeant in the NCPD’s Asset Forfeiture Unit and a close friend of then-Commissioner Mulvey, William Flanagan.Or as Parker called him at the time, “Bill.”“BILL”RECOVERED: Excerpts from retrieved emails between wealthy Nassau County Police Department benefactor Gary Parker and former Second Deputy Commissioner William Flanagan, deleted following a March 31, 2011 Press expose.Despite repeated questioning by prosecutors, Parker insisted he could not for the life of him remember when or how he met Flanagan, or how frequently he and other top police brass, such as former commissioner Mulvey, attended his dinner gatherings.The judge denied a request by ADA Bernadette Ford for Parker to be recognized as a hostile witness for his forgetfulness; his memory miraculously returning upon his cross-examination by Barket the following day.Parker did state that he was on a first-name basis with Flanagan by May 2009—though court testimony and recovered emails between the two suggest a much closer relationship with the former deputy commissioner and other top police brass.Just days before the May 18, 2009 JFK High School theft, for example, Parker offered Flanagan via another deleted email Yankees tickets and access to an “outdoor seating area…custom designed with 1,300 cushioned seats with padded backs that offer an extraordinary stadium experience.” That emailed offer, the filing states, also noted that Flanagan would have “access to the Terrace Level Outdoor Suite Lounge, a separate climate-controlled indoor environment that offers a multitude of exclusive perks, including access to private restrooms, high-definition TVs, a variety of menu options, and a four-sided cocktail bar that delivers an exceptional selection of beverages.”Parker sent a similar email to then-Police Commissioner Mulvey and current first deputy commissioner Thomas Krumpter and, too, leaving the tickets in an envelope for Flanagan at the Seventh Precinct, he said—describing them as “lousy seats” to prosecutors during direct examination.The revelations kneecap Barket’s prior adamant assertions to the press that his client didn’t even know Gary Parker at the time of his son’s May 18, 2009 theft.“It is to some degree mindboggling why it is Deputy Commissioner Flanagan was charged at all,” he professed to reporters outside the courtroom on the morning of their indictment March 1. “He did not even know Zachary Parker or Gary Parker on the date of the crime. He literally had nothing at all to do with the decision to arrest or not arrest Mr. Parker in May of 2009.”“My client did not know Gary Parker or Zachary Parker at the time of the commission of this crime,” he repeated. “He had no role in whether or not Mr. Parker should be arrested or should not be arrested in May of 2009.After that, well after that, they became acquainted, they are friends, they socialized together, they go to dinner together, their wives have met, they’ve been to each others’ house. Because they met and liked each other. I think they met at a golf tournament.“If it weren’t for golf tournaments I wouldn’t have any friends at all,” he joked when a reporter asked if their relationship at seemed at least a little conspicuous.“Honest to God, I didn’t follow your reasoning,” he insisted. “Is it suspicious that individuals make friends and that police officers have friends and that deputy commissioners have friends? No.”It’s what sworn police officers and deputy commissioners do for those “friends,” and what those “friends” do in return, that has prosecutors sounding the alarm.Former Nassau County Police Department Second Deputy Commissioner William Flanagan inside Nassau County Court in January.Following Hunter and Sharpe’s failed attempts to return the stolen equipment to JFK and Poppe’s repeated resistance to signing a withdrawal of prosecution, Parker met with Flanagan, according to his testimony, while Flanagan provided security for the Bethpage U.S. Golf Open June 18 and asked him for advice.“I understood that he had a close relationship with the police commissioner,” he told prosecutors, describing as his logic: “When the school got the property back the matter would be closed.”“He was undertaking something on his own,” Parker said of Flanagan.ADA Bernadette Ford had Parker read aloud for jurors a July 16 email he sent to Flanagan that prosecutors recovered after Parker deleted it—a heartfelt thank-you to Flanagan.“Just the fact that you’re stepping up to the plate is appreciated,” he read. “I certainly realize that they [JFK] hold all the cards.”“What did you want William Flanagan to do when you wrote this email?” Ford asked. “I’m not really quite sure,” he replied.Flanagan emailed Parker June 23 that he had “put pieces in motion,” and according to court documents, “made numerous attempts to get the stolen property returned to the school…despite the school’s insistence several days earlier that it would not withdraw criminal charges against Parker’s son.In another email in mid-August, Flanagan told Parker he had “stayed in contact with the squad supervisor” and that the squad supervisor was “aware of the importance” of getting the stolen property returned, says court documents, and in another assured him “it’ll happen.”In early September, Flanagan informed Parker by email that the equipment was successfully returned—though Poppe still refused to sign a withdrawal of prosecution.Ford has Parker read back his response and number of explanation points he included: “THANK YOU!!!!!!”He also read and translated Flanagan’s response: “de nada family.”Parker testified that the following day his wife sent two $100 Morton’s gift cards, a flashlight and a card to Flanagan, who replied that the gifts were “[o]ver the top” in a deleted email recovered by forensic technicians.He also testified that Flanagan, who was promoted to deputy commissioner two weeks after their talk at the U.S. Open, asked Parker to join the foundation in spring or fall 2010. He served as a board member from March 2010 until his resignation on April 1, 2011, a day after the Press article’s publication—and immediately after discussing concerns that his son would be arrested with Flanagan and the nonprofit’s board. That prompting Flanagan to email him: “remember what I said, you’re family, we take care of our own.”The same day, following calls from Krumpter, Flanagan, foundation board member and assistant commissioner Robert Codignotto and “maybe” Mulvey, he testified, he began cleansing his computer of emails to NCPD officials.“I deleted them,” he said. “It was probably morally the wrong thing to do.”Parker testified he’d received identification cards and a gold shield with a blue inset that read “Director” as a member of the group.He also told prosecutors that a year after Flanagan helped get his son’s stolen equipment returned, the deputy commissioner asked him to help get him an early release of a Tag Heuer “Aqua Racer” watch at a wholesale rate; one of Parker’s clients being French luxury goods conglomerate Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy (LVMH), which includes the high-end watchmaker. Instead of paying for the uber-prestigious timepiece—which can cost several thousands dollars at retail and are heralded by Cameron Diaz, Leonardo DiCaprio and Maria Sharapova, to name a few of the line’s celebrity “ambassadors.”Parker testified he got it for $1,510.16—the 50-percent-off rate exclusive to the company’s friends and relatives program—sent it to Flanagan, and told him to write a check to the foundation as payment.Time is something that his son Zachary has a good deal of now, and may have even more of in the near future, since he’s also facing drug-related charges in Florida.A jury will decide whether Flanagan, Hunter and Sharpe receive time as well.last_img read more

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Joe Biden getting the Cabinet he wants

first_img– Advertisement – Consider Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey, who is retiring rather than running again in 2022, and has been one of the few to say “yeah, Biden won.” In an interview Wednesday, Toomey said that Cabinet picks are a “shared responsibility” between the president and the Senate majority. Which is bullshit. The president picks his Cabinet. “So I think people who are well outside of the political mainstream don’t belong in really important, senior-level, Cabinet-type posts. And that’s why that will be an ongoing discussion, I think, between a Republican Senate and Joe Biden,” Toomey added.Then there’s Sen. Ron Johnson, the Republican from Wisconsin, who doesn’t even think Biden should be getting the intelligence briefings he is entitled to as president-elect—and who is far too stupid to be in charge of a committee like Homeland Security, which he is, indeed, in charge of! “In general, from what I’ve seen, intelligence briefings are really not worth a whole hell of a lot,” he told reporters. “Based on what we see in the SCIF, they don’t have much value.” If nothing else, we need to take the Senate back so this bonehead doesn’t do any more harm to national security.- Advertisement – So, yeah. Let’s get Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock elected!last_img read more

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