France to build fifth nuclear Barracuda-class submarine

first_img French defense minister Florence Parly announced on May 4 that another Barracuda-class nuclear attack submarine was ordered for the French Navy.According to a defense ministry statement, the decision to order the fifth boat in the class was made during a defense ministry meeting on May 2.The new generation nuclear submarines are built by Naval Group under a framework contract signed with the French defense procurement agency (DGA) in December 2006.France’s 2019-2025 White Paper includes the construction of a total of six submarines in the class: Suffren, Duguay-Trouin, Tourville, Dupetit-Thouars, Duquesne and De Grasse.Suffren, the lead boat in the class, was initially expected to be delivered to the navy in 2017 but current predictions say the submarine will be delivered in 2020, some three years late.Barracuda-type SSNs will replace the six Rubis-class boats currently in service. The Barracuda weapons payload will include next-generation type F21 heavyweight torpedoes, SM39 anti-ship missiles and MdCN-type naval cruise missiles. The boats will also be fully equipped for missions with NATO naval forces and special operations.In addition to funding the procurement of another Barracuda-class submarine, the defense ministry announced the launch of the development phase of the Tiger Mk III attack helicopter modernization program which will ensure the Tiger weapons system operational capability beyond 2040. Share this article View post tag: Suffren-class May 8, 2018 Authorities View post tag: Barracuda View post tag: French Navy View post tag: DCNS Back to overview,Home naval-today France to build fifth nuclear Barracuda-class submarine View post tag: Naval Group France to build fifth nuclear Barracuda-class submarinelast_img read more

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“Rapid deterioration” of finances in Oxford University Hospitals

first_imgWhile the trust has promised to impose stricter controls on expenditure and focus more efforts to employ more staff on its payroll, a health watchdog announced plans to keep a close eye on the new measures.Dr Holthof told The Oxford Times: “The trust is strengthening cost controls in the organisation in order to redirect the spending on delivering patient care.“These measures do not affect the staff employed by the trust but will affect agency staff. We will accelerate the recruitment of medical and nursing staff on our payroll in order to reduce our monthly expenditure on agency staff.”Non-pay expenditure should have been at £357.6 million but increased to £375.2 million throughout the year.Rosalind Pearce, Executive Director of Healthwatch Oxfordshire, said: “This is a significant overspend, and we recognise that the management of Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is going to have to make some difficult decisions in order to address it.”Chairwoman of Patient Voice Jacquie Pearce-Gervis said: “This is obviously very disappointing news. Patient Voice hopes that the control measures being put in place will not affect patient care in any way.” Oxfordshire’s hospital bosses have warned employees that there will be a “rapid deterioration” of finances after Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (OUH) revealed it had overspent by £24m from 2016/17.A statement from the Hospitals’ Chief Executive Bruno Holthof, Chief Executive to the trust’s 12,000 staff, said that “immediate and significant” change was needed, and that there were actions in place to “control both staff pay and non-pay expenditure”.Since he released the statement, Dr Holthof has confirmed the measures would not affect current employees, but agency staff.A report into the trust’s financial performance, which includes the John Radcliffe, the Churchill, the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre and the Horton General Hospital in Banbury, found that it had overspent on staff pay by £5.5 million and £19 million on non-pay-items such as medical supplies and stationery.The report also listed a number of reasons for the overspend, including a savings shortfall of £13.6 million, increased expenditure to reduce the number of delayed transfers of care patients, and a rise in urgent patient referrals in the winter.last_img read more

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Ginsters’ festive cheer

first_imgGinsters has launched three new festive lines to capitalise on consumer demand for party food and traditional flavours. A new 12-pack of Mini Festive Rolls in Pork and Cranberry and a standard Mini Sausage Roll 12-pack are offered. Ginsters has also brought in a limited-edition Christmas Sandwich, available in seasonal packaging, with a turkey, bacon and cranberry filling. “We’re introducing flavours that consu-mers really associate with this time of year,” said Andy Valentine, head of brand marketing for Ginsters.RRP: Rolls – £2, Christmas Sandwich – £2.99[http://www.ginsters.co.uk]last_img

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Seattle Post Office Renamed In Honor Of The Late Jimi Hendrix

first_imgJimi Hendrix was a man who needed no introduction–mostly due to the fact that he was talented enough to let his guitar do the talking for him. It’s that lasting musical legacy which has presumably inspired Washington state officials to green-light the official renaming of a Seattle-area post office in honor of the late guitarist, who died back in 1970 at the age of just 27.What was once registered as the Renton Highlands Post Office in the Seattle suburb of Renton, Washington, will now and hopefully forever be known as the James Marshall ‘Jimi’ Hendrix Post Office Building. The declaration was unanimously passed into state law from a bill co-sponsored by Rep. Adam Smith, D-Bellevue, and both of Washington’s U.S. senators in Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. It’s one of life’s great ironies when  governments which once despised a generational icon like Hendrix back in the late-1960’s, is now going out of its busy way to make sure he get’s his own post office. Then again, the man was known for his vibrant love of written correspondence and stamp collections… probably.Related: Someone Converted Jimi Hendrix’s Apartment Into The Hendrix MuseumThe guitarist grew up in the Seattle area, and is buried less than a mile from where his new Post Office stands at the Greenwood Memorial Park Cemetery. Although the guitarist was born and raised in the Seattle metropolitan area, it wasn’t until he relocated over to London’s mod-scene in the latter half of the 1960s when he began experiencing global success thanks to filmed appearances at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, and at Woodstock a few years later.“This designation will further celebrate Hendrix’s deep connection to the Puget Sound region and help ensure that his creative legacy will be remembered by our community and inspire future generations,” Rep. Smith said in a statement about the city’s latest tribute to Jimi.Back in June of 2017, a local park in Seattle’s Central District was opened to the public and dedicated in Jimi’s honor after year’s of planning and campaigning by The Jimi Hendrix Park Foundation.[H/T Seattle Times]last_img read more

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Surrounded by nature & reflected in it

first_img 17The “Fishbowl” at Currier offers a place to watch television, and, for Mara and friend, it is a place to perch. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 12One of the youngest residents of Currier is Mara Cavallaro. Her parents, Nadejda Marques (right) and Jim Cavallaro, are Currier’s House Masters. Her friend Autumn Galindo (left) holds the other end of the jump rope. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 2In 1972, full coeducational dormitories were instituted at Harvard — pictured here are the men and women of Currier House in a yearbook from the 1970s. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 6Because of the difficulty of pronouncing his first name, security guard Yohannes Tewolde is often called “Your Highness.” Here he shares a laugh with students Peter Davis ’12 (center) and Alexander Ramek ’12. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerStaff Photo Rose Lincoln/Harvard University News Office 4Yohannes Tewolde, the current and beloved night security guard at Currier, walks past the house entrance. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Audrey Bruce Currier House opened in 1970, named after a Radcliffe alumna who had died in a plane crash. The architects, Harrison and Abramovitz, surveyed students about their desires for housing, and so pioneered small clusters of dorm units, each with upstairs bedrooms and a downstairs living room. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Residents post ideas for a greener Currier on a board in the dining hall. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 25Currier House revelers are easily identified at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 26Currier’s finest and wettest, Alyssa Devlin ’11 (left) and Allan Bradley ’11, approach a dorm in the Yard to welcome new House members at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 7Says Yohannes Tewolde, “I hope I’m making a difference in their lives, encouraging them if they’re down. I tell them they’re doing a good job, and I pray for them. Sometimes I tell them to take a nap and get some rest. They tell me I’m like a mom or a dad.” He is pictured here with Suzanna Bobadilla ’13 (right), who waits for the bus. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 29Currier resident Tiffany Fereydouni is congratulated with a hug. Katherine C. Cohen/Harvard Staff Photographer 19Two days a week Mara gets a bike ride to ballet by Currier resident Lindsey Brinton ’12. Mara usually reads a book to and from the studio. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Devon Newhouse ’13, the “Eco Rep” for Currier House, proves that trash can indeed be treasure: She hosts a swap for clothing — and whatever else — in the House’s laundry room. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 21Living in the only undergraduate House at Harvard named solely for a woman are block mates Rachel Bervell (from left), Nadia Farjood, Jeanette Schnierle, Jordan Ashwood, Sarah Mumanachit, Karina Herrera, and Melissa Naidoo. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 22Students wait in the foyer for the shuttle as snow falls at Currier House. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 28Diplomas are awarded at Currier House. Katherine C. Cohen/Harvard Staff Photographercenter_img 14Autumn Galindo (left) waits for her ride after visiting her friend, Currier resident Mara Cavallaro, who is holding the door for a student. Mara’s mother, House Master Nadejda Marques (center), looks on. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 15Mara (left) and friend Autumn play air hockey while Currier students play ping-pong in the lower level lounge. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 23A Currier resident displays more than the conventional poster at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 11As part of an effort to make the House “greener,” Building Manager Manny Casillas replaced all incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent in all custodial, mechanical, and storage closets. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 20Lindsey Brinton ’12 teaches Mara to play the piano during their babysitting sessions at Currier House, where both reside. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Yohannes Tewolde goofs around with Currier resident Richard Maopolski (right). Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Some days, Mara’s bedroom is her gymnasium. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 5Patricia Machado (right) works in Dining Services at Currier House and is welcomed to work by Yohannes Tewolde. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer From the oversize windows in the room called “the Fishbowl” at Currier House, you can see lush green grass and blossoming trees on alternate sloping hillsides. Students who live in Currier, on Radcliffe Quad, have a longer walk to classes than their River House classmates but live more quietly, surrounded by nature. Since 1970, when Currier opened, the great outdoors have been invited inside. More recently, following the lead of the original architects, current Currier residents have “greened” the way they live, introducing environmental initiatives. Low-flow toilets and dishware drives are part of life in this House they call home. Living in a place nicknamed the “Tree House” comes with responsibility, which Currier’s staff and residents have embraced. 24When the various Houses extend invitations for living assignments to freshmen, Mark Piana ’11 (center, bare chest), and Kevin Chen ’12 (right) whoop it up for Currier House. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 3This black and white photograph of the Master’s living room at Currier House was published in a booklet distributed at the House dedication in 1971. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 27Currier resident Danielle Gram co-founded the nonprofit Kids for Peace, an organization that “works with children ages 3 to 10 to empower them to lead the way to a more tolerant, nonviolent society.” She was featured in Harvard’s special Commencement issue. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 16Mara plays the piano in the dance studio at Currier. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Young Currier resident Mara Cavallaro, on the school bus, is unhappy because her father, House Master Jim Cavallaro, is leaving on a work-related trip. He signs “I love you” to her. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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Treating more adults with statins would be cost-effective way to boost heart health

first_img Read Full Story A new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers has found that it would be cost-effective to treat 48-67% of all adults aged 40-75 in the U.S. with cholesterol-lowering statins. By expanding the current recommended treatment guidelines and boosting the percentage of adults taking statins, an additional 161,560 cardiovascular-related events could be averted, according to the researchers.“The new cholesterol treatment guidelines have been controversial, so our goal for this study was to use the best available evidence to quantify the tradeoffs in health benefits, risks, and costs of expanding statin treatment. We found that the new guidelines represent good value for money spent on health care, and that more lenient treatment thresholds might be justifiable on cost-effectiveness grounds even accounting for side-effects such as diabetes and myalgia,” said Ankur Pandya, assistant professor of health decision science at Harvard Chan School and lead author of the study.The percentage of Americans taking statins has jumped in recent years—as of 2012, 26% of all adults over age 40 were taking them, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—and so has controversy surrounding their use. In November 2013, the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) recommended that statins be prescribed for people with a 7.5% or greater risk of heart attack or stroke over a 10-year period, including many with no existing cardiovascular issues. Previous guidelines had advised statin use only if the risk was 10-20% or higher.last_img read more

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Harvard-Yenching Institute announces 2017-18 visiting scholars, fellows

first_img Read Full Story The Harvard-Yenching Institute (HYI) is pleased to welcome 46 fellowship recipients from major universities in Asia. Affiliates will spend the 2017-18 academic year in residence at HYI. Established in 1928, the Harvard-Yenching Institute is an independent foundation dedicated to advancing higher education in Asia in the humanities and social sciences, with special attention to the study of Chinese culture. The group of visiting scholars and fellows includes faculty members and advanced graduate students in the humanities and social sciences.Since 1954, more than 1,000 scholars and fellows from East Asia and Southeast Asia have received HYI visiting scholarships and fellowships. For more information, please visit www.harvard-yenching.orglast_img

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Man Acquitted of Hempstead Teen’s Murder

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A North Valley Stream man has been cleared of allegations that he fatally shot a 17-year-old boy in the victim’s hometown of Hempstead two years ago.Pedro Merchant was found not guilty Wednesday of second-degree murder following a trial at Nassau County court.Authorities had alleged the 22-year-old man shot and killed Dante Quinones on Dartmouth Street on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013.Community members and activists were so outraged by the shooting—one of several that year—that they organized local efforts to help prevent further violence before it happens.The case also resulted in the arrest of six people for allegedly rioting at First District Court in Hempstead when Merchant first pleaded not guilty during his arraignment.last_img read more

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Bay Shore Man Charged With Murder

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Bay Shore man was arrested and charged with murdering a 26-year-old man who was found dead in a wooded area of Middle Island two weeks ago, Suffolk County prosecutors said.Michael DirkschneiderMichael Dirkschneider pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder, second-degree murder and criminal possession of a weapon Wednesday at Suffolk County court.Authorities said the 30-year-old suspect allegedly shot Alexander Incorvia to death behind a shuttered K-Mart store on Middle Country Road.Police recovered a .45-caliber handgun, which investigators believe to be the murder weapon, from Dirkschneider’s dresser on April 2, the same day a woman found the victim’s body, prosecutors said.Incorvia’s body was found by a woman walking her dog in the wooded area behind the vacant store. The victim, a resident at the Comfort Inn on Route 112 in Medford who had been reported missing days earlier, was shot multiple times.A grand jury indicted Dirkschneider for the homicide on Friday, prosecutors said.last_img read more

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At least 72 Indonesian doctors have died from COVID-19: IDI

first_imgAt least 72 doctors across the country have died from COVID-19, the Indonesian Medical Association (IDI) said on Saturday.“Based on information received by IDI, at least 72 doctors are reported to have died after testing positive for COVID-19 or while being a COVID-19 PDP [patient under surveillance],” IDI spokesperson Halik Malik said on Saturday as quoted by kompas.com.Halik said that four doctors had died in the past week alone, the latest of which was Andhika Kesuma Putri, a pulmonologist in Medan, North Sumatra. He said that most of the doctors who died were relatively young, ranging between 28 to 34 years old. “Generally they have comorbidities, but there were also some with no comorbidities at all,” he said.Read also: Medics concerned as Jakarta sees rising COVID-19 hospitalizationsHe said that the increasing number of cases and deaths showed that the outbreak in the country had yet to be put under control. “The government should focus on restoring public health through policies and strategies that have been proven to control COVID-19 transmission,” he said. “It should optimize testing, tracing, isolating, and treatment in all regions.”According to the official government count, Indonesia had recorded 109,936 confirmed COVID-19 cases, with 5,193 deaths as of Saturday. (kmt)Topics :last_img read more

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