Elkhart to end moratorium on utility shutoffs and late fees

first_img Elkhart to end moratorium on utility shutoffs and late fees IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market By Tommie Lee – April 14, 2021 0 201 Facebook Google+ Facebook Pinterest Google+ (“electric meters” by jasonwoodhead23, CC BY 2.0) Elkhart’s moratorium on late fees and utility shutoffs will end next month, according to city officials.The Elkhart Truth reports that the city will notify customers in advance of the change. The public health emergency in Indiana is set to expire on April 30, so Elkhart’s Public Works and Utilities are spending this final month informing the public about the change.It’s hoped that this will give customers enough time to make the necessary payment arrangements and avoid any disconnection issues. WhatsApp Previous articleBBB warns of tutor scam targeting cheating studentsNext articleDoctors trying to put Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause into perspective Tommie Lee Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

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Biscuiteers to open second shop

first_imgLondon biscuit company Biscuiteers is to open its second retail site this month.The business, which has recently branched into licensed biscuits, will be opening the 80sq m biscuit shop and icing café in Clapham’s Northcote road. This is will be a sister site to the firm’s existing shop in Notting Hill.Harriet Hastings, managing director of Biscuiteers, said she had good expectations for the shop. She said: “It’s a bigger shop and there is a lot more footfall where it is located.”The new site will feature an open kitchen, where the bakers will create bespoke orders in the shop from scratch.The business also has two other kitchens in Vauxhall and Camberwell, which supply products for its online business.Hastings said: “We are still a young brand, but we are unique in what do and the shops are a good way to showcase that.“We are designed to be an online service business. We do wholesale, too, through luxury brands, so actually it is a learning curve for us to learn how to do it the other way round in retail.”The company creates biscuits with two recipes, chocolate and vanilla, but use a Christmas spice biscuit base around the holiday.Hastings continued: “We are now an over-£2m business, which has been grown organically.”The Notting Hill shop currently runs two regular icing classes a week, which take 10 people each. It also runs icing ‘late’s’ events [late night classes] for young professionals to come to after work, and will look to run similar classes in the new shop.last_img read more

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Farm Camps.

first_imgChildren who live or work on the farm face unique safety risks. To help them avoid injuries, the Georgia Healthy Farmers Program will offer two camps for children and young teens.The Farm Safety Camp is for children 10 to 13 years old, and the Tractor Certification Camp is for ages 14 and 15. Both will be June 25-27 at the state FFA-FHA camp in Covington, Ga.The safety camp offers animal, equipment and personal safety classes. It includes such topics as ATV safety, water safety, introductory CPR, sun sense and understanding pesticides.The tractor camp is a 15-hour course designed to meet Georgia Department of Education and Department of Labor guidelines.The cost of either camp is $45 before May 31 or $60 after that. Get applications from Nancy Fussell at 1-800-367-9083 or Judy Hartley at (912) 370-2617.last_img read more

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Weekend Pick: Asheville Hot Chocolate 10K

first_imgThere are very few things that beat warming up with some good hot chocolate on a cold day. Combine that with one of the best 10Ks in the Blue Ridge region? Now that’s a real winner. See for yourself this Saturday at the Asheville Hot Chocolate 10K.The reviews of the Hot Chocolate 10K are simply shining: “The Hot Chocolate 10k in Asheville is a tasty mid-winter treat for runners at a time when good races are few and far between,” says running blogger Richard Hefner. “A great way to start the new year!” another racer claims.Here’s some more good incentive, for those of you who might be a little nervous to take on the 10K challenge: the Hot Chocolate 10K race is widely known as the “flattest 10K” in the Asheville area. No hills, no problem. The course follows a gentle path through the city, perfect for beginner runners or a great chance for more experienced racers to focus on speed and form. The race will begin at 8:55 AM Saturday morning, with a hot chocolate celebration and awards ceremony to follow. In addition to all that delicious cocoa, racers will receive a commemorative long-sleeve shirt at the finish. The race is capped at 750 participants, but there’s still room for more! Online registration has closed, so interested runners should register on-site the morning of the race. Registration costs just $40, and benefits the local Isaac Dickson Elementary School Parent Teacher OrganizationHot Chocolate 10K.Hot chocolate + fun miles + good people = one great event. Get in on the action at the Asheville Hot Chocolate 10K!last_img read more

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If It Scares You, Do It: Rappelling Is Within Reach

first_imgWhy limit your outdoor experiences to the familiar hiking trails and hanging in a hammock? The stunts you see outdoor pros pull off on TV are within your reach once you make the decision to attack a new experience.For those who want some on the edge fun, nothing quite compares to the experience of making your way down a tall cliff or rock face while depending on the rope, carabiners, and your own inner strength. Rappelling is a rite of passage within the climbing community and is a great way to return to the base of a mountain after a climb or hiking experience that involves a descent elevation gain and can be enjoyed by people of all skill sets.Petit Dru, the peak where rappelling was first attempted.Photo by camptocamp.orgThe creation of the adrenaline filled experience is credited to Jean Estéril Charlet, a French climber based in Chamonix. Rappelling or abseiling (as it is know in the rest of the world), was first practiced while Charles made his descent from the Petit Dru, a sharp peak in the French Alps in 1876. By the turn of the century, rappelling gained in popularity throughout the climbing world. Climbers from all over the world tried taking the idea and developing it even further. Successfully doing so, Otto Herzog, a German climber and inventor first introduced the use of carabiners to the sport in 1911.Since that time, rappelling has transformed the outdoor recreation world with many different variations of knots, harnesses, and techniques tailored for different types of terrain. Three main types of rappelling practiced today are the standard rappel where a person’s back faces the ground with face up while descending a ledge. A free rappel is a technique often practiced by covers where a person’s body is suspended in open space while they slide down the rope to solid ground. Lastly and certainly not least is the Australian rappel that puts a climber to the ultimate test of facing downward while making their descent.Rapelling is now used as a military training technique, a means to rescue people, and amongst many other purposes it is also a recreational pursuit for thrill seekers and those wanting to branch out a bit, putting their fears and limits to the test.Defying your brain’s normalized laws of gravity, rappelling successfully and with much control can involve putting your body at a 90 degree angle and walking down a massive steep rock backwards. Scary as it may seem, many who have tried it can only seen to boast on how exhilarating the adventure is from start to finish. Like many outdoor pursuits, rappelling can happen just about anywhere from the side of a building to a mountaintop. A specific location that is popular in many guided rappelling and climbing adventures is waterfalls both as their waters are rushing in the warmer months and while frozen in the winter.For an immersive adventure on the edge without the costs of buying your own gear, you can give it a try on a guided trip on your next vacation or right near your home within the Blue Ridge Mountains. Many guided trips will assist you in your journey by providing gear, transportation, instruction, guides and sometimes even meals for a pretty fair price. An excursion of climbing and rappelling beginning at 9:30 a.m. and ending at 4 p.m. for an individual who is a beginner and over the age of 10 near Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina goes for $129. When factoring in the thrills with the views you would have combined with the comfort of knowing you are with practiced professionals that will keep you entirely safe, that’s not too bad!The saying goes, “If it scares you, do it.” So maybe this summer is the summer of chasing after a new adventure like rappelling. If there’s one guarantee in going after an experience like it, it’s that you won’t go home unchanged. For some tips and techniques to get started off in the world of rappelling, check out this article from Climbing Magazine and view the video below produced by REI.last_img read more

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The Marriage Boat: On Reconciling Love and Adventure

first_imgIf you’ve ever paddled in a tandem canoe with your significant other, you know why it’s called the “divorce boat.” Adventures of any kind in the outdoors can either make or break a relationship, so we sat down with three active couples to learn how they navigate the turbulent waters of married life.There’s no better analogy for marriage than sailing the open sea. To quote the 1973 classic hit “Rock the Boat” by Hues Corporation, “Our love is like a ship on the ocean. We’ve been sailing with a cargo full of love and devotion.” But sometimes, the sea, like life, can be a capricious thing, and no matter the amount of love and devotion in the hold of that ship, a little adversity can be all it takes to rock the boat.Early on in their relationship, Harrisonburg, Va., locals Anna and David Landis, were exposed to many a stormy sea. Just a few months after the two started dating, they packed their bags and moved to the Middle East, where they spent nearly a decade living as expats in Israel and Palestine.Anna and David Landis.“When you’re living abroad for that long, your friends cycle in and out, and it can be really refreshing and helpful to have a partner there with you, but that also makes it harder when you have a conflict,” says Anna Landis, “because then, you’re each other’s only steady companion.”Still, living thousands of miles and seven time zones away from family didn’t keep the Landis’ from pushing their limits, both individually and as a couple. In 2009, they each hiked the Camino de Santiago separately, and later returned to hike it together in 2011 and the Camino del Norte route in 2012. They’ve since hiked the Annapurna Circuit, toured cross-country by bike, road tripped throughout Europe and Alaska, and self-published two guidebooks on the Jesus Trail and the Camino de Santiago under their publishing company Village to Village Press. Landis has done more than 20,000 miles of bike touring and has developed a number of long-distance hiking trails in the Middle East, including the Jesus Trail and the Jordan Trail.While they each have fond memories of these adventures together, there was no doubt there were trying times. On that cross-country bike tour, for example, which the couple took just a week after being married and with David’s two sisters and their husbands in tow, Landis remembers feeling self-conscious about her pace.“We were loaded down and averaging 80 miles a day for seven weeks and I was just exhausted,” she says. “This was my first huge tour, and a lot of the times, I would be straggling in after everyone else. I was always the slowest one. It’s already kinda stressful to do those big long days, but to feel like you’re letting people down, that was tough sometimes.”Lydia Wing of Saluda, N.C., remembers that feeling of insecurity, which is why she didn’t paddle with her then-boyfriend Chris, an experienced kayaking instructor and Wave Sport sponsored freestyle competitor, when she was first learning to kayak. She paddled with her parents instead.Lydia and Chris Wing“The beginner progression can be challenging and frustrating and sometimes you feel embarrassed holding the group back,” she says. “I tended to funnel those frustrations into anger, so I started paddling with my parents a lot because my mom couldn’t break up with me if I got mad at her while we were kayaking.”Once Lydia felt confident on the water, she and Chris started paddling harder whitewater together, but even then, the two encountered a different set of challenges, namely, how to continue giving Lydia the room to develop herself as a competent paddler.“Whether it’s in the eddy above the rapid or picking up the pieces at the bottom, being able to sort through what you’re feeling and have your counterpart listen and not just tell you what you want to hear but empower you and validate how you’re feeling, that’s really important,” says Lydia. “We weren’t good at that for a long time and there were times on the river that were stressful and heated.”“There is no hiding your emotions while kayaking,” says Chris. “All of your insecurities and fears surface, no matter what, and it comes out in different ways. Sometimes I’m too empathetic because I coach and teach so much. I have to be able to turn off that coach and be a husband as well, and that’s my biggest challenge.”In 2012, Chris and Lydia started H2o Dreams, a kayak instruction school offering everything from beginner roll clinics to international paddling trips. All of a sudden, the couple wasn’t just living and playing together—they were now working together, too. Not long after the two embarked on this entrepreneurial enterprise, Lydia started having doubts.“A lot of people will laugh when I say this but I really experienced a quarter-life crisis,” Lydia says. “I freaked out because I went to college and then I met this guy and this job working with him totally fell into my lap. I started to wonder what I would do if it weren’t for Chris, like who would I be and what would I be doing?”[nextpage title=”READ ON!”]The All-or-Nothing MarriageWhat Lydia experienced is something an increasing number of modern day couples are having to confront, and that is the question of whether or not your significant other should help you achieve self-actualization. Last year, Northwestern University social psychologist Eli Finkle published a book called The All-or-Nothing Marriage. In it, Finkle compares the history of marriage to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.Up until 1850, a successful marriage was defined by the meeting of basic needs such as “food production, shelter and protection from violence,” writes Finkle in a 2014 New York Times op-ed. From 1850 until 1965, “marriage increasingly centered around intimate needs such as to love, to be loved and to experience a fulfilling sex life.”But from 1965 until today, Americans, who more or less had those fundamental needs met, looked to marriage for self-discovery, the pinnacle of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. That, according to Finkle, is leading to either record-high levels of marital quality, or marriages that fall drastically short of a partner’s expectations.Lydia, recognizing that Chris couldn’t possibly answer those questions for her, made a leap. She started working for a non-profit, and although she didn’t work there long, it returned that sense of sovereignty over her life that had been missing.“I recognized pretty early on that John couldn’t be my everything, which is probably why I’ve survived being a weekend bike widow for so long,” says Rebecca. “Before, because I was so profoundly unhappy in my career choices, I was resentful of this great joy that John had. But if you stop thinking about the things that take your partner away from you and start thinking about the space that that gives you to find your passions, you’ll come much closer together.”Rebecca Herod of Morgantown, W.Va., had a harder time making that dive. She and her husband John had, by all appearances, a successful life. She was the Director of Marketing and Communications at West Virginia University. John had his own lucrative contracting business. The two owned a house and doted on their two dogs. Despite the unquestionable love they had for each other, John had another love, too—mountain biking. The sport was part of John’s very essence, an activity he’d been doing since he was just a child. He’d been a competitive downhill racer for years, traveling almost every weekend during the season, but even now as co-founder of the West Virginia Enduro Series, he was out of town a lot.“Early on in the relationship he was out having a good time [mountain biking] and I was working all of the time and not having fun,” says Rebecca. “That wasn’t his problem though. That was my problem. His happiness didn’t need to get smaller. Mine needed to get bigger.”When the stress of her work started to negatively impact her physical and mental well-being, Rebecca turned to yoga. At first, yoga was purely a personal pursuit, but she felt such fulfillment from her practice that she decided to quit her job and begin teaching yoga.“I left a very lucrative position at the university to be a yoga teacher which, contrary to popular belief, is not a money-making venture,” she says. “I was worried when I did that because we had a certain lifestyle and that was going to change. I was afraid that would put strain on our marriage and our finances.”As a self-employed entrepreneur and downhill mountain biker, John was no stranger to risk. He understood Rebecca’s fear of the unknown and her simultaneous need to confront that uncertainty head-on. Much like mountain biking served as an outlet for stress relief and purpose in his life, he recognized that yoga played a similar role in Rebecca’s.“Although we don’t do those two things together, it works for us,” he says. “Everyone needs mind-cleansing activities. You can’t always rely on your partner to make your world perfect.”Shifting the ParadigmWhether you’re in a relationship like John and Rebecca, who maintain separate passions, or like Chris and Lydia, who live, work, and play together, time spent outdoors shouldn’t cause stress on the relationship. If it does, the first thing you should do is set a regular date night.According to a 2012 study released by the University of Virginia’s National Marriage Project, date nights can improve the overall quality and stability of relationships and marriages. Spouses who spent deliberate “time alone, talking, or sharing an activity” at least once a week “were approximately 3.5 times more likely to report being ‘very happy’ in their marriages, compared to those who enjoyed less quality time with their spouse.”Life for Anna and David has changed dramatically in recent years. For starters, the couple now has two kids under the age of three, which make scheduling date nights seemingly impossible. And while David decided all of those years ago during his first thru-hike of the Camino de Santiago that he preferred to adventure with his wife by his side, he’s had to adapt the activities that give him such fulfillment to be more inclusive for his family. This past summer, the four-person tribe headed West so that David could bike the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route in the company of Anna and their two kids, who met up with him along the way.“I like going hard and going fast, there’s no doubt,” he says, “but I think the greater value is being outside and being together.”John and Rebecca make a point of designating Thursday nights as date night. The evening’s activities must be “neutral ground,” which means no yoga and no mountain biking. The two typically go out to dinner, see a concert, or simply stay at home and binge watch Stranger Things and Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency.Chris (right) and Lydia Wing live, work, and play together, which makes time for date nights more important than ever.Chris and Lydia admit that date nights are few and far between. “We’re married and we kayak together and we started our own business together. There are a lot of blurred lines,” says Lydia. But when they first started dating, and before Lydia began kayaking, the couple went on really cool dates and shared new experiences, which they say they’d like to return to.“It’s systemic in our culture that that sacred time is one of the first things that falls to the wayside,” says Chris. “We’re so motivated and so driven and so career-oriented that we forget about the things that bring real joy in our lives.”Additionally, social psychologist Eli Finkle argues that it’s perfectly acceptable for couples to look to each other for support in achieving self-actualization, if those expectations are clearly communicated and the couples are willing to put in the hard work (read “more date nights”) to make that happen. But, says Finkle, “if couples lack the time and energy, they might consider adjusting their expectations, perhaps by focusing on cultivating an affectionate bond without trying to facilitate each other’s self-actualization.”“I recognized pretty early on that John couldn’t be my everything, which is probably why I’ve survived being a weekend bike widow for so long,” says Rebecca. “Before, because I was so profoundly unhappy in my career choices, I was resentful of this great joy that John had. But if you stop thinking about the things that take your partner away from you and start thinking about the space that that gives you to find your passions, you’ll come much closer together. You don’t have to share the same love affair with biking, but you do have to recognize how that love affair enhances the soul. You want to be with somebody who’s got a soulful love. It just makes us whole people.”last_img read more

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Don’t get Uber’d

first_imgWe have all heard the Netflix story time and time again. Netflix kills Blockbuster. It’s a simple story. Blockbuster viewed Netflix as a specialty service that would never catch on so they didn’t move to deal with the disruption that Netflix caused in their industry.Now we are seeing a different kind of disruption; the kind of disruption that causes more than one industry to crash. UBER provides an excellent example of this. The world is changing and we are seeing the rise of the “Sharing” economy. Think of AirBnB for lodging or TaskRabbit for errands. This list is continuing to grow. In fact in our FI backyards we have seen the rise of the LendingClub a crowd sourced lending site that has gained attention from Major FI’s as a disrupter in the lending space.UBER represents the best of breed in this space. It’s a simple concept really. They have cars and drivers. They can get something from point a to point b very effectively and more importantly they leverage technology to make the hardest part of the transaction (being paid) very easy.This brings me to the next issue. What happens when some of these companies that are gaining huge traction in the market decide they don’t want to pay 3% to the credit card companies anymore? Think of Amazon and their “Bank payment” option. What happens when these guys leverage their technology and use ACH or some other “Over the top” payment process? This is a danger I see coming up. As these services grow and their technology backbones become mature they will start looking upstream for other payment options. After all what is VISA or MC but a network. What’s to keep UBER from doing this? What’s to keep any technology savvy vendor from making this decision?My suggestion to you is: Start watching your inbound ACH now and start understanding what things are coming in this way that are non traditional. PayPal? Amazon? How much of a dent are they making in your interchange?Don’t get Uber’d folks. Pay attention. The world is changing… 30SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Best Financial technology service expert John Best crushes the reiterated maxim “thinking outside the box” to tiny particles, leveraging his lofty, yet proven, financial technology “innovativeness” for credit unions nationwide. Recently … Web: big-fintech.com Detailslast_img read more

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3 tips on how to manage someone older than you

first_imgThe millennial workforce is typically described one of two ways. They are either characterized as a segment of job-hoppers who lack motivation, or as entitled and unappreciative “brats.” In most cases, these stereotypes couldn’t be farther from the truth. In fact, many in this generation are highly successful and garner professional accomplishments at a young age.In some organizations, millennials are hired into management positions; this can prove difficult for certain employees when their manager is younger. On the other hand, for the new millennial manager, it can be a challenge leading older employees who feel resentment toward them or who are understandably skeptical of the new leader’s abilities.If you’re a leader who’s found yourself managing employees older than yourself, here are three tips to effectively manage your workforce.Make connectionsGet to know each and every member of your team on an individual basis. Connect with them and demonstrate that you care about them and their job performance. Show that you are on their side and are there to help and support them. Giving them that confidence will encourage open communication and will help to foster positive rapport.Keep collaboratingIsolating yourself from your team will only lead to them feeling like they can’t approach you. Employees that are older than you have life and work experiences they can share to help everyone in the organization be successful, including you. Collaborate with them and encourage them to be creative. The more you communicate with them and work with them, the more useful and valued they will feel.Be the bossThe bottom line is you’re the boss and your employees need to treat you with respect. To garner the appreciation you expect and deserve, always carry yourself with confidence. Don’t underestimate yourself just because of your age. You’ve been placed in your position for a reason and your skills, work ethic, and talents will speak for themselves. 98SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Wendy Moody Wendy Moody is a Senior Editor with CUInsight.com. Wendy works with the editorial team to help edit the content including current news, press releases, jobs and events. She keeps … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Gov. Cuomo gives NYS update on COVID-19

first_imgNEW YORK (WBNG) — Governor Andrew Cuomo gave an update on the state’s progress regarding positive COVID-19 cases yesterday.  It’s going to take the work of all of us now to make sure we don’t go backwards on our hard-fought progress. We must all continue to wear our masks, wash our hands, remain socially distant, and above all, stay New York Tough.” Governor Cuomo said 1.07 percent of yesterday’s coronavirus tests taken in the state returned positive. Cuomo said the Southern Tier saw a positivity rate of 1.1 percent yesterday. In the state, the Governor reported there were 8 COVID related deaths. Excluding red zone areas in Brooklyn, Queens, Rockland County, and Orange County, the percentage of positive test results was just below 1 percent at a rate of 0.96 percent. Governor Cuomo said, “Our numbers remain good news, even as clusters appear in certain areas of the state. Our testing system is so advanced that we were able to track clusters to 2.8 percent of the state’s population and attack the virus within that population,last_img read more

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People moves: Ilmarinen picks RI lead; Firefighters’ scheme names chair

first_imgIlmarinen, Firefighters’ Pension SAB, SuMi TRUST, Schroders, BDB Pitmans, PAMIlmarinen — Finland’s largest pension insurance company Ilmarinen has appointed Karoliina Lindroos as its new head of responsible investment. She replaces Anna Hyrske, who left the company to head up responsible investment for the Bank of Finland last month after working for Ilmarinen for more than 20 years. Lindroos joins the firm from her current role as senior environmental and social adviser at Finnish government development finance company Finnfund. Lindroos is to take up her new role on 31 August.Firefighters’ Pension SAB – Joanne Livingstone has been named chair of the UK’s Firefighters’ Pension Scheme Advisory Board, which advises the Home Secretary on the desirability of making changes to the scheme. It also advises and assists the 45 Fire and Rescue services in England and their local pension boards. Her appointment as chair commenced on 17 August 2020 and will last for four years. The FPS is a statutory unfunded pension scheme. Livingstone is currently an adviser to the Judicial Pensions Committee, which advises the Lord Chief Justice in relation to pensions matters. She also serves as the chair of trustees for the Liberty Europe Pension Scheme and is a practitioner member of the Actuarial Council. Previously she worked as a scheme actuary and for Pension Wise, acting as a guider in face-to-face meetings about pensions with members of the public.SuMi TRUST – The Asian asset manager has appointed Shigeo Mito as director of client services and global business development based in the firm’s London office. In his new role Mito will focus on cultivating and expanding SuMi TRUST’s European client base, in addition to developing new bespoke products for investors.Mito has more than 20 years of experience in the asset management industry. He started his career at SuMi TRUST in 2000 working in proprietary trading and went on to manage Japanese equity funds from 2008 to 2017. Prior to taking up his current role he worked as an equity investment specialist, collaborating with SuMi TRUST’s client services and business development team in Europe.Schroders – Nicole Kidd has been named head of private debt for Australia, a new role at the listed asset manager. She will assume the position on 1 September and be based in Schroders’ Sydney office. She joins from RBC where she was most recently managing director and head of corporate banking Australia and institutional client management Asia-Pacific. Nicole will focus on building and developing Schroders’ Private Debt business.Georg Wunderlin, global head of private assets, Schroders, said: “The arrival of Nicole next month marks another significant step in the ongoing growth of our specialist private assets business. Whether it be through selective acquisitions or hiring the best talent, Schroders is dedicated to securing high-quality additions to drive the growth of this business.”He also said that “growing Schroders’ private assets business is a key strategy focus for the firm”. The asset manager is “seeing vast opportunities in private debt specifically which makes this a high priority area for our expansion path.”Schroders private assets and alternatives business manages £45.3bn (€49.8bn) in assets, including private equity, hedge funds, infrastructure finance, insurance-linked securities, commodities, real estate, impact investing and securitised credit.BDB Pitmans – The law firm has hired Alex Rush for its pensions team. Rush joins from Stephenson Harwood, where he trained and practised for more than 13 years. In addition to his private practice work, he has undertaken two secondments to the board of the Pension Protection Fund and acted as a defined benefit scheme secretary for seven years.Pacific Asset Management (PAM) – The firm has announced the appointment of multi-asset ESG specialist Will Thompson as portfolio manager with a focus on its multi-asset SRI funds. Thompson will report to PAM CIO William Bartleet.Thompson joins from HSBC Global Asset Management where he had worked as a senior portfolio manager on the multi-asset team since 2014. At HSBC, he was responsible for running the HSBC Multi-Asset Sustainable, HSBC World Selection and HSBC Global Strategy funds. Prior to this he had been an intern analyst at the Bank of England and also worked as an analyst for Asset Risk Consultants.PAM’s SRI range includes the SRI Cautious Growth and SRI Balanced Growth portfolios, the latter of which has been available to investors since 2012. Originally an offering from Parallel Investment Management, they were acquired in June 2020 as part of a strategic partnership with Fidelius Group.last_img read more

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