Elkhart to end moratorium on utility shutoffs and late fees

first_img Elkhart to end moratorium on utility shutoffs and late fees IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market By Tommie Lee – April 14, 2021 0 201 Facebook Google+ Facebook Pinterest Google+ (“electric meters” by jasonwoodhead23, CC BY 2.0) Elkhart’s moratorium on late fees and utility shutoffs will end next month, according to city officials.The Elkhart Truth reports that the city will notify customers in advance of the change. The public health emergency in Indiana is set to expire on April 30, so Elkhart’s Public Works and Utilities are spending this final month informing the public about the change.It’s hoped that this will give customers enough time to make the necessary payment arrangements and avoid any disconnection issues. WhatsApp Previous articleBBB warns of tutor scam targeting cheating studentsNext articleDoctors trying to put Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause into perspective Tommie Lee Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

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Sonardyne Boosts Ormen Lange Seabed Monitoring

first_imgNorske Shell is launching a 10-year seabed subsidence monitoring campaign at its Ormen Lange gas field in the Norwegian Sea, using long-endurance sensors from subsea monitoring specialist Sonardyne.Norske Shell’s goal is to continuously monitor any movement of the seafloor at Ormen Lange.The data should help the energy company to detect changes that might be caused by ongoing gas extraction and inform its reservoir management strategy, as it continues to produce from the huge field over coming decades, Sonardyne explains.By monitoring vertical displacement of the seabed, operators can detect even small production induced changes in their reservoirs and overburdens, which can then help reduce subsurface uncertainties in their modelling and planning.For the project at Ormen Lange, which will run from 2019 to at least 2029, a field-wide array of 50 Sonardyne Fetch subsea sensor logging nodes configured as pressure monitoring transponders (PMTs) will be deployed in 800m to 1,100m water depth. There, the Fetch PMTs will collect pressure, temperature and inclination data at the seafloor, at pre-programmed intervals, throughout the full 10-year deployment. Using this data, vertical displacement of the seabed will be calculated, enabling Norske Shell to better track what is happening across the field.This is the latest deployment of Sonardyne sustained observation technology at Ormen Lange. Sonardyne’s Autonomous Monitoring Transponders (AMTs) were used for a five-year, full-field monitoring project at Ormen Lange, starting in 2010. Back then, the AMTs were used to collect millions of acoustic ranges between each instrument, as well as pressure data, to monitor seafloor deformation in three dimensions. During that project, over half a gigabyte of data was uploaded wirelessly to surface vessels during eight data harvesting missions.For this latest project for Norske Shell, starting this autumn, a number of innovations have been made, including doubling the battery endurance of the sensors to 10 years, and increased pressure sensor accuracy.Shaun Dunn, global business manager for Exploration & Surveillance, at Sonardyne, said: “We have been working closely with Shell’s geoscience teams at this field for more than 10 years and our latest technology developments have created a sensor which enables operators to continuously monitor seafloor deformation with the extremely high precision that is required for proactive reservoir management.“Indeed, since the first trial in 2007 and subsequent full-field deployment in 2010-2016, we have doubled the battery life of our Fetch PMTs, from five to 10 years, and we’ve improved their sensitivity. Our ultimate goal is to achieve towards <1cm per year of unresolved relative subsidence. Further advances we have made with our unique AZA (Ambient-Zero-Ambient) technology will move us closer to this goal.”Norske Shell’s senior project surveyor, Tomas Frafjord, said: “Shell has fully supported Sonardyne for over a decade in the development and improvement of seabed subsidence monitoring technologies that have been used to great effect at several of our fields. While the oil and gas industry drove these initial developments, it is very pleasing to note that they have also become a key tool for the scientific community, enabling scientists and researchers to measure movements of subduction zones and tectonic plate boundaries. This, in turn, is helping to unlock a better understanding of the earth’s dynamics and providing the information which can be used as an early warning system of potentially catastrophic events along major populated coastlines.”last_img read more

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Erickson: This may be the end, but it’s not goodbye

first_imgWell, it’s certainly been a brief four years my friends.I’ve covered countless beats during that time. I toiled through rebuilding seasons with the soccer teams, a season with each tennis team respectively as they tried to find the right mix, two wonderful years with the women’s hockey team that ended in a national title and, of course, two years with the football team that were each capped with return trips to the Rose Bowl.But no beat was closer to my heart than men’s hockey.Yes, I’ll admit it: I love hockey with unquantified passion.After a season of struggle, the hockey team almost had me convinced I was going to cover another down year for my final lap on the beat after a 1-7-2 start. As fans and critics tried to persuade me with their outsider beliefs that head coach Mike Eaves should be fired or that this team with all their talent was such a waste, I held onto my convictions that they were capable of something great.Enter the WCHA tournament.Sitting in the press box at the Xcel Energy Center, I was a ball of nerves for three days straight. On the verge of breaking out in tears at a Badgers’ loss, I was stunned again and again as Wisconsin continued to win game after game until that beautiful moment they hoisted the 2013 Broadmoor Trophy – the last one in the WCHA as it’s currently known.Their run earned them a spot in the NCAA tournament. With a fourth seed, Wisconsin traveled to Manchester, N.H. and got smacked by UMass-Lowell 6-1.I didn’t travel to Manchester. As far as I knew, my final days covering the team were some of the greatest I had ever experienced. A week later it was all finished, but I never had to say goodbye. I never shed a tear. The ending was perfect.And maybe that’s the way I need to leave not only The Badger Herald but also Madison — to let it go in this open-ended way.As far as I’m concerned these last four years – with all their ups and downs – are exactly like my final days covering hockey. They were wonderful, nerve-wracking and eventually made me feel like I was on top of the world.There was move-in freshman year, sporting a confident exterior that hid the well of insecurities, waiting to be unpacked in turn. The nerves set in but eventually went away.More than a year later, I was already covering a major sporting event: the Women’s hockey team’s 2011 NCAA Title. I was living a dream. I was covering the sport I love, doing exactly what I love. It felt like nothing could slow me down – not even a nasty bout of strep throat or the awful city that is Erie, Penn. (Apologies to any natives, but that town is not my cup of tea).And I didn’t slow down. During my junior year, I stepped into the football and men’s hockey beats. But I also faced my own personal crises; those few moments that creeped into my life every now and then, making me question whether I really wanted to write, whether I could really make a career of it. In the face of self-created, minor adversity, I knew I didn’t want to do anything else.Finally, my senior year, that playoff push and insane tournament run which just served as a quick metaphor for my college career.I’ve been dreading my ultimate goodbye to this wonderful city and all the brilliant people in it.So instead of worrying about it or attempting to write some perfectly worded farewell, I’m just not going to say anything.Sure, come Sunday, May 19 there will be tears and hugs all around as I part ways with some of my greatest friends and move onto the daunting, scary, real world. But there will be no goodbyes on my part.Until next time.Kelly is graduating in a week and, well, is thoroughly freaked out by it. She is moving back home to the great state of Minnesota to cover some baseball for the summer before worrying about finding a full-time job. Feel free to keep in touch via Twitter @kellymerickson.last_img read more

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Jed Welsh: It’s time to try some freshwater

first_imgIt looks like some of you anglers with boats moored in the Bay could spend an evening catching a load of squid and head for the Channel Islands or find a likely spot in the Bay. You all know where ever the squid are located there has to be silver giants near. With the local saltwater fishing being so poor you might check out the freshwater action. Reports from the lower Owens River say the fishing is finally picking up as the releases from the dam have leveled off but you still have work to find the fish. The trout move around very little in the cold water of winter. Reports are that this time of year 90 percent of the fish will congregate in 10 percent of the water. Rapala and Irvine Lake present a Red White and BLUE PRESIDENTS DAY TROUT TOURNAMENT. It will be held Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Two boats heading for Catalina turned around because of the conditions and made a feeble attempt at local fishing. One single boat made it to the sand dab hole and caught 2,720 “dabs” for 13 anglers. Commercial sources are revealing that there is lots of white sea bass activity at the Channel Islands and the word’s also out about the Santa Monica Bay teeming with live squid. Anglers can win all kinds of daily prizes from free boat rentals to rod and reel combos and lake passes. The daily tournament entry fee is $10. Per day. There are also daily cash jackpots for the single big trout weighed in. Irvine Lake will be stocked heavily with lunker trout. 976-TUNA Rod and Reel Club are putting on a Albacore Seminar with Captain Rick Hayes at the helm. Topics are “Albacore on the Iron”, “Private Boat Strategies”, “Where to Find Them”, “Bait Fishing” and “Albacore On the Plastics”. The seminar is Thursday, March 1 and starts at 7 p.m. at the National Sports Bar in Torrance, 3210 West Sepulveda Blvd, Torrance CA. Phone (310) 328-8426. The Fly Fishing Show will be held 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 3, and from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, March 4, at the Pasadena Center, 300 E Green St., Pasadena. Admission is $14 per day or $24 for both days. The two-day event features seminars and demonstrations by some of the finest fly-fishermen, fly-casters, and fly-tyers in the nation. Contact The Fly Fishing Show at (800) 420-7582 Mike Goodwin of Lake Havasu City, AZ, caught two bass weighing 5 pounds, 13 ounces to win $125,000 in the $1 million Wal-Mart FLW Series National Guard Western Division tournament on Lake Havasu with a four-day catch of 15 bass weighing 37-13. The catch gave him the win by a solid 1-pound, 5-ounce margin over Mike Phua of Chino, CA, who caught a total of 18 bass weighing 36-8 and earned $48,841. Just a few days away, the beautiful, pink-meated Lightning Trout will make their 2007 debut at Santa Ana River Lakes and Corona Lake. The colorful trout will be stocked three consecutive weeks, and plants will include trophy-sized Lightning’s along with more plants of huge rainbows. All of the fish will come from Mt. Lassen Trout Farms in Red Bluff. The first Lightning Trout will arrive on Valentine’s Day night, Feb. 14, and they will be planted the following two Wednesday nights as well. If you’ve never caught these trout, you’ll fall in love with them during one of these three Lightning Trout weekends – Feb. 15-18, Feb. 22-25, and March 1-4. Don’t forget the Tundra & Lightning fishing tournament at Corona Lake Sunday, February 25. The Tournament offers free raffle tickets and thousands of dollars in prizes. The single big fish award wins an all expense, 6 day paid fishing trip, to Cabo Lucas for two. Fish tale In 1922 my adventures continued on Catalina Island as a 12- year-old kid patrolling and fishing the beachfront around Avalon. Bait for certain kinds of fishing was very difficult to get. The grown ups got most of it and left us kids with nothing. Once I saw a school of anchovies panicking in the water off Pebbly Beach as some very large white sea bass were on the attack. The anchovies were pushed to the shore and some were actually jumping up on the beachfront. I put one on a hook and threw it out and immediately got spooled by a 40-pound sea bass. After that we searched the beaches for the anchovy schools and once in a great while they showed up the same way and we always hooked up on nice white sea bass but it was far in between schools so naturally I got impatient. Looking for another fishing method I cut six inches off my mother’s kitchen broom, painted it dark blue and white (anchovy colors), screwed a treble hook into the end, walked the beach constantly casting and retrieving. We used to catch everything with that plug. We caught calico bass, barracuda, halibut, sea bass and we didn’t have to wait for the anchovies to jump up on the beach. Unfortunately, all the brooms in Avalon seemed to disappear. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img On Tuesday February 5, the Sportboat City of Redondo had two seabass hooked up and while one angler lost the bigger of the two, the other smaller one was landed and it weighed in at 63 pounds. The City also had limits on the sand bass and sculpin. But after that the saltwater local fishing took a major dive as the storm front did its damage and most sportboats at every landing were stuck in their slips. last_img read more

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Haynes gets winner for Taft in OT

first_imgFreshman Rmanii Haynes dribbled from beyond half court and made a layup with nine seconds remaning in overtime, giving host Taft of Woodland Hills a 44-43 victory Tuesday night over Pacifica of Oxnard in a Southern California Regional first-round game of the Division I girls’ basketball state playoffs. “Rmanii did it. Rmanii did it. She came through for us on a night we did not come to play,” Taft coach Mark Drucker said. Amber Dixon’s steal and layup finally gave Taft the lead with a minute left. But Janessa Martinez came through for Pacifica (20-11) with a layup with two seconds remaining to force the extra period. Pacifica had leads of three points twice in overtime but Taft (24-2) would not go away. Sophomore Joy Hubbard buried a 15-foot jumper and Haynes’ heroics won the game after Taft deflected the ball off a Pacifica player with 15 seconds left. “We left our game at the Sports Arena when we won the City title Saturday,” said Drucker, whose team won its 24th consecutive game. “They did a great job on our post players inability to play defense. We came out flat and couldn’t shoot a lick. We were so lethargic out there but pulled it out in the end.” Taft, coming off its first title in school history, scored only six points the first 12:36 of the game. Dixon finished with nine points for Taft and Davis scored seven. Taft plays at A.B. Miller of Fontana (31-2) in. Thursday’s regional quarterfinals – Jacob H. Pollon After being held scoreless the first fiveminutes of the fourth quarter, Taft rallied. Nayshon Williams’ layup, two free throws from Haynes and a 12-foot jumper from Autumn Davis pulled the Toreadors within a point with 1:50 left. center_img OTHER STATE PLAYOFF GAMES DIVISION I Long Beach Poly 79, Grant 23: Amanda Corona had seven points and Arpine Armikhanyan added six for visiting Grant of Van Nuys (19-2). Jasmine Dixon led Poly (32-1), ranked No. 2 in the nation, with 23 points. DIVISION IV L.A. Baptist 60, LACES 58: With 13seconds remaining and the score tied, L.A. Baptist of North Hills’ Christina Cherry drove to the basket and was fouled. The senior calmly sank both free throws and led the host Knights to a first-round victory over ninth-seeded LACES (6-15). Cherry compiled a triple-double with 23points, 21 rebounds and 11 blocks for eighth-seeded L.A. Baptist (22-6). Andreanna Marshall, who leads the area in scoring with 26.8 points per game, was held to a season-low eight points. “(Cherry) came out big,” L.A. Baptist coach Mary Christiansen said. “(Marshall) was a bit off and had to distribute the ball more.” The Knights will play at Marlborough of Los Angeles (23-6) on Thursday. – Steve Vranau 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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City Council president sides with union, urges visitors: Boycott LAX-area hotel

first_imgEscalating the city’s battle for a living-wage ordinance for hotels near Los Angeles International Airport, City Council President Eric Garcetti has urged potential visitors to boycott the LAX Hilton because of ongoing labor problems. In a seven-paragraph letter addressed to “hotel patrons” and obtained Thursday by the Daily News, Garcetti details workers’ calls for a boycott amid labor disputes and urges visitors to book at locations in the city away from the LAX area. Garcetti also notes worker unrest at other Century Boulevard hotels and says: “The hotels have taken a strong stance against paying their workers a living wage. “To protect your event and support workers, I urge you to honor the boycott and avoid booking at the Hilton Los Angeles Airport Hotel until the dispute is resolved,” Garcetti wrote in the letter dated Feb. 27. “This is one of those examples in our organization where we have good people of good will on both sides of this issue,” Collins said. “Having said that, there is nothing good for us that comes from a labor dispute. “What this letter does is heighten attention to the issue, which is what I’m sure is the intention. But I do have to say, I wish it weren’t there.” Tourism big business Tourism brings in more than $13 billion a year to the local economy – the largest for the region. Meanwhile, the long-struggling downtown Convention Center has only recently begun to show a profit after years of running annual deficits in the $20 million range. The city has agreed to heavily subsidize a luxury hotel near the center in hopes of boosting convention business. Matt Szabo, a spokesman for Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, said the mayor had not seen the letter and was unavailable for comment Thursday. Villaraigosa is headed for Miami and a U.S. Conference of Mayors panel on poverty. Garcetti would not comment on the letter. His spokesman, Josh Kamensky, said it was provided to the union to send to potential LAX Hilton customers. “This is an endorsement of the workers at the hotel,” Kamensky said. “Eric was very involved in the hotel battle, and he was asked to write this letter of support of the boycott. He felt it would be inappropriate not to respond.” The letter was requested by UNITE Here, the union that represents hotel and restaurant workers, as part of its effort to pressure change at the Hilton hotel. On its Web site, the union calls for a boycott of LAX Hilton. James Elmendorf of the Living Wage Alliance, which has supported workers’ efforts, said Garcetti’s letter helps the union highlight the issues. “We don’t know if it really affects their business, but it lets potential customers know what’s going on here,” Elmendorf said. Elmendorf said the union has sent copies of the letter to companies that have done business at the Hilton in the past. Grant Coonley, general manager of the LAX Hilton, said the letter will have a ripple effect. “We don’t just compete in Los Angeles,” Coonley said. “We compete across the country. I have a 1,200-room hotel, and if someone receives this letter, I think they’re going to say, `Why bother coming to L.A.?’ It doesn’t just hurt us. It hurts the whole region.” Jack Kyser, chief economist of the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp., called it an unusual move by an elected official. “It’s an interesting development when you have a labor dispute,” Kyser said. “Usually, it’s just the union trying to block business. It’s rare to have an elected official send out a letter. I think people might step back and say we’ll just stay away from L.A. for the time being.” Kamensky said Garcetti made clear in the letter that there are a number of alternatives to the LAX Hilton in the city. Debating implications The letter provides information on contacting the Los Angeles Convention & Visitors Bureau as well as referral to a union-backed Web site for more information on the labor dispute. “We want people to come to L.A. and have a good time,” Kamensky said. “We just think they will have a more enjoyable time if they are at a hotel where there is not any labor strife.” But Harvey Englander, a spokesman for the LAX-area hotels, said the letter has broad implications. “This is a labor dispute, and the government should not be sending out letters like this,” Englander said. “The last time I looked, the convention and tourism business brings in a lot of money to the city. I don’t see how it is responsible for a city official to get involved like this.” The LAX Hilton is one of a dozen hotels in the area that is in court with the city about a proposed living-wage ordinance. Under the ordinance, 13 hotels along the Century Boulevard corridor would be required to increase workers’ pay to $9.39 an hour with health insurance, or $10.64 an hour without health benefits. The business community has strongly opposed the ordinance since the City Council first approved it in November. Council members have argued that the city can require the higher wages because the hotels directly benefit from their proximity to LAX and city-sponsored airport modernization. But the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce teamed up with hotels and spent $800,000 to gather more than 103,000 signatures to put the ordinance on the May ballot, with the hope that voters would overturn the law. To head off an expensive election, the City Council repealed the ordinance and introduced a new law in mid-February that kept the living-wage requirements but also promised $1million for street improvements near the hotels and $50,000 to develop a marketing plan for a new Airport Hospitality Enhancement Zone. But hotels and the business community argued that the ordinance was essentially the same and challenged it in court. Earlier this month, the business community won the first round in its legal challenge. A judge ordered the city to delay the law’s implementation until she has a chance to consider the issue in May. [email protected] (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Labor disputes about unionization and wage issues have roiled the hotels in recent months, but the direct involvement by a city official drew outrage and concern Thursday from business, hotel and tourism officials. “In my 32 years of Chamber of Commerce experience, it is unprecedented for an elected official to communicate with out-of-town visitors discouraging their patronage of a local business,” said Gary Toebben, president of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce and a vocal opponent of the living wage ordinance. “The LAX Hilton pays $5.6 million a year in taxes. The Hilton operations include 10 hotels and its global headquarters in Los Angeles. “A letter like this sends the wrong message about Los Angeles and to Los Angeles businesses that are trying to attract customers to this region.” Michael Collins of L.A. Inc., the agency responsible for luring conventions to the city, said he worries that the letter could discourage some people from visiting the city. last_img
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