Groundbreaking in Normal Heights for affordable homeless veterans housing

first_img Posted: January 11, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Groundbreaking in Normal Heights for affordable homeless veterans housing KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Homelessness FacebookTwitter SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Construction began Thursday on a 52-unit housing development for homeless veterans in Normal Heights.Known as The Lofts, the development on El Cajon Boulevard near State Route 15 will offer studio and one-bedroom rental apartments at an estimated range of $446 to $796 per month. Tenants will receive supportive services from the Alpha Project, a homelessness assistance nonprofit, according to the San Diego Housing Commission, which is among the entities involved in the project.The units will be designated as affordable for 55 years under a federal voucher program. They will be available for tenants with an income up to 50 percent of the area median income, which is currently $31,850 annually, according to the commission.“Today’s groundbreaking is an important step in addressing homelessness among military veterans in the city of San Diego,” SDHC Executive Vice President Debbie Ruane said.The project is being funded with a $3 million federal grant, $2.2 million from the city’s affordable housing fund and a $13.5 million loan.The Lofts project is part of the SDHC’s homelessness action plan launched last summer, which will see the award of up to $30 million over the next three years for the development of at least 300 new supportive housing units, according to the commission. January 11, 2018last_img read more

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Alleged drunk driver who fatally struck jogger pleads not guilty to murder

first_img Dan Plante, KUSI Newsroom, August 30, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsEL CAJON (KUSI) —A probationer who was allegedly under the influence of alcohol when he lost control of his work truck and struck a female jogger in Lakeside pleaded not guilty Thursday to charges of murder, gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated and DUI causing great bodily injury.Michael Woodfill, 46, who was on probation for a DUI conviction from 2016, was ordered held on $1 million bail in the death of 41-year-old Susana Gotell.According to the California Highway Patrol, Woodfill was traveling eastbound on North Woodside Avenue near Riverford Road about 6:40 p.m. Monday when his truck drifted to the right and hit a chain-link fence. Woodfill then overcorrected, steered the truck across the opposite lane and struck the jogger, said CHP Officer Travis Garrow.Woodfill’s truck continued down a dirt embankment after striking Gotell and overturned, Garrow said.The victim was transported to Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego, where she later died. A Gofundme has been made to help the victim’s family.Garrow said Woodfill remained at the scene, and officers determined that he was allegedly under the influence of alcohol at the time of the deadly collision.The Santee resident faces a maximum of 15 years to life in state prison if convicted. He will be back in court Sept. 24 for a readiness conference. Dan Plante, KUSI Newsroom Posted: August 30, 2018 Alleged drunk driver who fatally struck jogger pleads not guilty to murder Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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A possible explanation for varying measurements of Venuss rotation rate

first_img © 2018 Phys.org A trio of researchers with the University of California and Sorbonne Universités has found a possible explanation for why Venus probes have found different day lengths for the planet. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, T. Navarro, G. Schubert and S. Lebonnois describe a theory they have developed based on observational data. Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domain Image: Cloudy Venus More information: T. Navarro et al. Atmospheric mountain wave generation on Venus and its influence on the solid planet’s rotation rate, Nature Geoscience (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41561-018-0157-xAbstractThe Akatsuki spacecraft observed a 10,000-km-long meridional structure at the top of the cloud deck of Venus that appeared stationary with respect to the surface and was interpreted as a gravity wave. Additionally, over four Venus solar days of observations, other such waves were observed to appear in the afternoon over equatorial highland regions. This indicates a direct influence of the solid planet on the whole Venusian atmosphere despite dissimilar rotation rates of 243 and 4 days, respectively. How such gravity waves might be generated on Venus is not understood. Here, we use general circulation model simulations of the Venusian atmosphere to show that the observations are consistent with stationary gravity waves over topographic highs—or mountain waves—that are generated in the afternoon in equatorial regions by the diurnal cycle of near-surface atmospheric stability. We find that these mountain waves substantially contribute to the total atmospheric torque that acts on the planet’s surface. We estimate that mountain waves, along with the thermal tide and baroclinic waves, can produce a change in the rotation rate of the solid body of about 2 minutes per solar day. This interplay between the solid planet and atmosphere may explain some of the difference in rotation rates (equivalent to a change in the length of day of about 7 minutes) measured by spacecraft over the past 40 years.center_img Journal information: Nature Geoscience Citation: A possible explanation for varying measurements of Venus’s rotation rate (2018, June 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-explanation-varying-venus-rotation.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Measurements of the rotation speed of Venus have varied over the years for unknown reasons. It is known that it takes 243 Earth days for the planet to spin just once, but exact measurements have varied by an average of seven minutes. Prior research has also shown that the atmosphere circulates around the planet much faster—getting all the way around in just four Earth days. In this new effort, the researchers suggest they might have found at least one of the characteristics causing the planet to spin at variable speeds, and it has to do with atmospheric circulation.The researchers started with a long-standing wave that has been observed in Venus’s cloud formations—a wave approximately 10,000 kilometers long. They noted that similar waves have been seen on Earth, due to air colliding with mountains, but those typically dissipate rapidly due to air currents. But the atmosphere on Venus is notably thicker than on Earth, an observation that intrigued the researchers. They created a simulation to recreate the cloud formations seen on Venus and introduced the idea of mountains on the surface as the cause. After adding in all known ingredients in Venus’s atmosphere and accounting for the planet’s size and density, they finished by adding mountains on the surface. They then ran the simulation.The researchers report that the simulation did show a wave formed in the cloud tops, similar to that seen on the actual planet. But they also found that the braking effect caused by the atmosphere running into the mountains actually slowed the spin of the planet—the amount depended on the time of day. They found that on average, though, the effect was enough to cause up to two minutes of variation in planet spin speed—not enough to account for the observed seven minutes of variability, but enough to suggest other physical features could be playing a similar role.last_img read more

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This Introvert Entrepreneur Found the Courage to Network With 20000 People and

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. May 10, 2017 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global As a freelancer, I don’t get out much. This year, I decided to change that.When an invitation came to attend Collision in New Orleans, it seemed like the perfect fit. The timing was good and the conference looked amazing. It’s about tech, with special focus on women in tech; right up my alley.I aimed to rock this thing by dealing with potential issues in advance. Good planning, plenty of information and real commitment to not sweating the small stuff would help me make it through. Here’s my pre-conference checklist — and how it shook out in reality:1. Set goals.Before I said yes, I asked myself why I wanted to go to this thing. It was certain to be expensive,but would it be worth it?I decided to go for the opportunity to network and interview and write about people and technology I might not otherwise get the opportunity to learn about. My goal was to get a boost in readership with great stories that could lead to new opportunities.Reality: The jury is still out, but if my readership grows and I gain some new opportunities as a result, it was money and time well spent.Related: 5 Essential Tips on How to Get the Most Out of Conferences2: Find my tribe.With all the people attending, I had to know some of them, right? I hit social media to find out, and it turns out I did. In fact, some people I absolutely adore were going.Reality: It was more difficult than I anticipated to hook up with friends. We are all busy and going in different directions. I keep missing Ahn Nguyen and Rachel Moore somehow, and only passed Beki Winchel a few times, even though we shared a rental house! Still, knowing I had friends nearby helped put me at ease.Related: How Famed Entrepreneur Seth Godin Built His Tribe3. Research speakers.To make the most of my time, I decided how many interviews I could reasonably make, and prepared questions and discussion points tailored to each interviewee. There were some exciting people on my list.Reality: I wasted much of my advance research. With thousands of journalists in attendance, speakers had to budget their time. The list I made turned out to be useless. As we got closer to the conference, I was flooded with emails from people who chose me, and frankly, most of them were a great fit. I wanted to talk to women at the top of tech, and fantastic opportunities cropped up. I operated on instinct, had genuine conversations and picked up some great insights. The results might even be better than planned questions.Related: The 10-Step Routine Guaranteed to Prepare You For Your Next Big Event4. NetworkI began tweeting and posting using the conference hashtag weeks in advance, responding to people I don’t know who will be there, retweeting information from organizers, making new connections and plans to meet.Reality: I’m still hashtag retweeting like mad, but the real networking value is in face-to-face. Not even on purpose — just sharing space — I met dozens of writers and editors. I sat on a couch to rest and found myself accidentally eavesdropping on an interview with Rob Cox from Reuters. Sorry Rob. I couldn’t tear myself away. I tried to not be creepy.Related: 4 Ways to Organize a Conference That’s More Than Just Networking5. Conversation icebreakers.It’s not always easy to start or join a conversation, and I thought a working knowledge of New Orleans might come in handy. I am always surprised when people don’t know what etouffee is, because it’s crack to me. I cannot get enough. I found a travel guide to New Orleans that details the best places to find my favorite foods and describes the different areas of the city we’ll be close to.Reality: Knowledge came in handy during conversation, but I didn’t really need icebreakers. Everybody was there to network. Introductions came easy.Related: Break the Ice: 8 Networking Tips for Introverts6. Personal decisionsI work from home, I don’t have clothes! I obsessed over what I would wear. I shopped online for weeks, rejecting everything. I wanted to look professional without looking like I tried too hard. I bought things like false eyelashes and under-eye concealer.Reality: In the end, I decided to be 100 percent myself. I packed shorts and decent shirts. It’s usually hot in New Orleans, and there would be a lot of walking. I wanted to be comfortable. I decided not to wear makeup, because I don’t. People were dressed in everything from suits to shorts. Most people wore comfortable casuals. One guy rocked a striped shirt and pants with a crazy allover argyle pattern. Say what you will, it was memorable and got attention.There a few items that I wish I had brought:A big supply of breath strips/mints: But I did bring a whole pharmacopeia. My rolling laptop bag was packed with heartburn remedy, Pepto Bismol tablets, ibuprophen, gas pills, and Zyrtec. Just in case. The Big Easy is all about rich sauces and red beans.Wireless headphones: I’m easily distracted and not accustomed to a lot of activity. I would have been better prepared for last-minute interviews if I had found a corner in the journalist room and blocked out my surroundings with noise canceling headphones and rain sounds to get some work done.Comfier shoes: My flats are comfortable, but not enough. By the first afternoon, I wondered if it it too late to buy a Segway. Are those still a thing?Cash: The public transportation system and the parking lots at the convention center are cash-only and exact change. That would have been good to know in advance. I never carry cash.Mini laptop: My laptop serves as my desktop. It’s not made for travel. It has a 17.5 in screen and weighs eight pounds. I bought a small rolling bag, but it’s still pretty inconvenient. Everybody had a mini laptop, and they were obviously much easier to lug around. Toni McQuilken showed me her brand new Surface, and I’m envious!Umbrella: Why didn’t I bring an umbrella?? We’re having a monsoon. It’s chilly and windy and rainy…in New Orleans. In May.Spare phone battery: Mine dies too quickly, and always at the worst possible time. I wasn’t alone. The phone charging area remained packed.Better cell phone: The lighting in the dim cavern of the journalist lounge was easy on the eyes, which was great, but my cell phone has a terrible low-light camera that turned out to be useless. I had to wing it. Next time, I’ll choose a phone with a better camera.Related: 15 Conference Travel Tips to Reduce Stress and Save Time and MoneyNow that the conference is over, my best piece of advice is this: Know what you want to accomplish, and keep your eyes on the ball. Weigh the value of each presentation against your objectives and decide which ones to attend in context. Register Now » 7 min readlast_img read more

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