Milford Care Centre brings Limerick communities together

first_imgVanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Print Twitter Previous articleMore detail needed on capital programmeNext articleOpinion – The Irishman who ran for England – Jim Hogan RIP Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Advertisement Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Email TAGSlimerickMilford Care CentreMilford Compassionate Communities center_img Facebook Linkedin MAYOR of Limerick’s Metropolitan District, Cllr Michael Sheahan, has praised Milford Care Centre’s Compassionate Communities project for bringing people together to help each other through the difficult issues of death, dying, loss and care.Speaking at the Compassionate Communities Project Seed Grant Awards and Film Launch last Friday, Cllr Sheahan (FG) reflected on the importance of communities joining together to support people during difficult times, when people can be at their most vulnerable.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “Milford Care Centre’s Compassionate Communities project is reigniting the old concept of ‘Meitheal’ bringing people together to help each other through the difficult issues of death, dying, loss and care,” he commented.The Project Seed grant scheme, now in it’s third round of awards, recently invited applications for brilliant ideas that can make a difference to how communities engage with issues around death, dying, loss and care.The grants, which are matched with direct funding, or funding in kind, from community groups, have been awarded to projects including: Le Chéile Youth Space Factory; Bedford Row Family Project; Abbeyfeale Town Park and Glorach Community Theatre; University Hospital Limerick; West Limerick School Completion Project and Abbeyfeale Spiritual Garden of Remembrance Project.Compassionate Communities Project co-ordinator, Dr Kathleen McLoughlin, commented, “It’s wonderful how communities can get an idea off of the ground with just a small amount of funding that can make such a difference to other people.”In addition to the awarding of seed grant funding, the Compassionate Communities Project also launched two new short films. The films, developed by recent UL Computer Science graduates, known as Bold Pup Media led by Killian Stone encourage people to think and talk about their wishes at the end of life.CEO of Milford Care Centre, Pat Quinlan, stated, “The new films are absolutely excellent, and reflect how, by working in partnership with the University of Limerick we are able to develop new resources and in turn offer young graduates an opportunity to gain experience and knowledge in the field of death, dying, loss and care. We wish the best of luck to the seed grant recipients and look forward to seeing the projects up and running later this year.”The next round of grant funding will open for submissions in September 2015. To find out more, log on to www.compassionatecommunities.ie. Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” NewsLocal NewsMilford Care Centre brings Limerick communities togetherBy Alan Jacques – January 15, 2015 858 WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

Read More →

Banned doctor worked in Limerick hospital

first_img TAGShealthLimerick City and CountyNewsUniversity Maternity Hospital Limerick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Limerick on Covid watch list UMHL hosts virtual Ceremony of Remembrance for families who have experienced loss Email Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Linkedin WhatsApp Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students center_img Previous articleSponsored: Soul Centred Retreats at Aherlow House HotelNext articleElverys get extra copies of Dreams: An Unforgettable Year back on shelves Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Facebook UL Hospitals Group announces gradual relaxation of access restrictions at maternity hospital NewsHealthBanned doctor worked in Limerick hospitalBy Bernie English – December 22, 2018 7896 Twitter Print University Maternity Hospital LimerickA DOCTOR who was working in Limerick fooled the authorities and failed to tell them he had been banned from practice in the UK for serious misconduct.Dr Abdel Karim El Awad Mohamad, who qualified from the University of Khartoum in Sudan in 1977, gave a different name and birthdate to the Irish Medical Council when he came to practice in Ireland.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He worked in a number of Irish hospitals, including the University of Limerick Maternity Hospital and his deception only came to light when a claim was brought by a patient at the Limerick Hospital.An expert witness in the civil law case recognised him as being suspended by the UK medical authorities.On foot of an application from the Medical Council this week, the High Court suspended the doctor from practising in Ireland and High Court President Peter Kelly said that he was publicly stating that Dr El Awad Mohamad is prohibited from practising medicine in Ireland, pending the findings of a Medical Council investigation.He had been suspended from practice by the UK Medical Council for nine months from May of this year.Reports at the time of his UK suspension said that he had been found to be culpable of misconduct, serious misconduct and particularly serious misconduct.In the most serious of the incidents, it was reported that the doctor continued to forcefully examine a pregnant woman at the Northampton General Hospital despite her telling him to stop.The matter came to light in November when a consultant obstetrician who was giving evidence in a court case recognised Dr Mohamed as the doctor suspended in England and alerted the authorities.Judge Kelly said it was very important that all paperwork relating to medical staff be thoroughly checked by hospital authorities to prevent a repeat of what happened. TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type!last_img read more

Read More →

What We Mean by Software-Defined Storage

first_imgIt’s day two of EMC World 2013 in Las Vegas. Everybody here is talking about or asking about software-defined storage. Let me give you a couple of analogies to help you understand what we mean by software-defined storage and what we at EMC are doing. There are two main components to keep in mind.Virtualize Everything, Compromise NothingIn my living room at home, I have a half-dozen control devices for my TV, my set top box for streaming Internet content to my TV, a DVR, a video game that my kids use more than I do, a DVD player, and an amplifier. There is nothing more annoying than not being able to watch a program because my kid has hidden the remote. I’d rather not have to search for it and fiddle with it. I’d rather just watch the program. It’s the same in the data center. You need dedicated operators for different infrastructures. And it’s a real pain.To control the devices in your living room, or to control the different devices in your data center, you need a common way of doing it. It’s more efficient. The folks in the data center can be way more productive. And it’s more reliable, because you tend to do things in a standard way.So if the universal remote control is what controls your home entertainment devices in your living room, software-defined storage controls the physical arrays in your data center. That’s the first part of what we are doing with software-defined storage.But that’s only half of it. In addition to providing a new model for storage management, software-defined storage also provides a new architecture for new kinds of workloads. And this is where the story really gets interesting.To continue the home entertainment analogy, a lot of the programming that was created for your traditional television set really didn’t produce a lot of high demands. Not all that long ago, you could only view about 525 lines or so of a TV picture if you were in the U.S., or 625 lines, I believe, if you were in Europe. But, either way, there really wasn’t any killer content to make TV come more alive.Over time, the entertainment industry went a long way to make movies and programming look phenomenal. But the regular, traditional TV just wouldn’t do it justice. So, in order to view the new movies and programming in all its glory, we needed something to interpret that content type. Without an HDTV and an HD DVR, you just didn’t get the full experience. So, people went out and got the wide screen, HDTV to watch the Super Bowl. And they kept the smaller TV they had in the kitchen for convenience. Different devices for different types of content.We see the same thing happening in data centers. A lot of new applications are being built in a different way, and we need new capabilities to interpret the new content types. So think of software-defined storage as enriching the underlying storage arrays to interpret these new content types that many of these new applications will be building.Now, traditional applications are not going away. Industry analysts estimate that traditional workloads will expand by 70% between 2012-2016. These workloads are typically block and file workloads. They require a high degree of transactional consistency. And a lot of the resiliency is built into the hardware itself. But we think the real opportunity going forward is going to be in next-generation cloud applications. These are a relatively small number of apps today, but they are growing explosively — ten times faster than traditional workloads! Typically, they are not going to require a block or file storage infrastructure. Object storage is what they are going to demand.We think we have solved many of these challenges with a product we call EMC ViPR. It is not just a point product. It is a platform for software-defined storage – both a new model for storage management, as well as the data services that provide a new architecture for new kinds of workloads. To learn more about it, see yesterday’s post, What is Software-Defined Storage?, by my colleague Amitabh Srivastava, head of EMC’s Advanced Storage Division.last_img read more

Read More →

Layoffs in Lake Worth Beach to Help Finance Electric Utility Upgrade

first_imgThe city of Lake Worth Beach is laying off 5 city employees effective immediately, eliminating 35 jobs, and cutting $800,000 from its budget according to reports. For years, the city has been taking money from its city electric utility and using that money to run the city and not putting it back into the utility, and City Manager Michael Bornstein says something has to be done so that the city can upgrade its utility.“And we’re reversing 40-50 years of that benign neglect. If you’re not constantly maintaining and fixing and rebuilding and upgrading your electric utility, it’s deteriorating,” Bornstein said.The system is deteriorating power outages are common for customers in Lake Worth Beach.Dave Palombo owns Dave’s Last Resort and Raw Bar in downtown Lake Worth Beach.“It was bad. I mean we had power outages all the time, power surges, spikes, shorting out equipment,” Palombo told CBS12.The layoffs were effective yesterday, and the employees did not receive a severance package. “I was very surprised and a little disappointed. I had no warning. It came as a big surprise,” said Vickie Joslin, the city’s head librarian who was laid off from the city after 20 years on the job.last_img read more

Read More →