Conservation Tillage Conference coming soon

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest High input costs coupled with low grain prices anticipated in 2016 means that growers have to make smarter, calculated choices to grow profitable crops this year.Also important is the need to build and maintain healthy soils to help ensure good water quality, said Randall Reeder, a retired Ohio State University Extension agricultural engineer. Reeder is an organizer of the annual Conservation Tillage Conference offered March 2-3 by The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.As farmers prepare for spring planting, much of their planning will focus on where and how to cut costs for 2016 without reducing net income, Reeder said.‘Corn University’“Many growers are tightening their belts because of tight budgets, low prices and not much money in the bank,” he said. “For a few years, grain farmers were making good money. But in 2015 grain prices fell sharply, with 2016 prices looking to stay low.”CTC will offer numerous presentations designed to help growers learn where to cut back while ensuring they have healthy soils, healthy water and hopefully a healthy bank account, Reeder said.The program includes a “Corn University” and “Soybean School” that will be offered during the annual conference, he said.Topics to be discussed during the Corn University March 2 include:• Corn yield forecasting.• New molecular methods for insect control.• Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium management highlights for corn.• Taking a second look at hybrid performance and technology.• Crop-effective and environment-responsible nutrient placement in strip-till and no-till corn.Topics to be discussed during the Soybean School March 3 include:• Ohio soybean limitation survey results.• Managing weeds in soybeans.• Fertility management.• Managing soybean insects.• The future of soybean breeding.• Top 10 ways to improve yield, without breaking the bank.The Corn University and Soybean School are just two of a total of eight concurrent sessions during the conference. More than 900 participants are expected to attend the event, which is organized by OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, with assistance from USDA and SWCDs.OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms of the college.The conference will offer the latest research, insight, tips and techniques on precision fertility, cover crops and manure, water management, technology and equipment, nutrient management, and advanced cover crops. It features some 60 presenters, including 25 CFAES researchers and Extension educators, as well as farmers and industry representatives.Certified Crop Adviser continuing education credits are available, with an emphasis on soil and water and nutrient management hours.Topics presented during the two Cover Crop sessions include:* Understanding the legal aspects of manure application.* On-Farm experiences with cover crops and manure.* Enhancing soil mycorrhizal fungi to retain nutrients.* Improving soil carbon for healthier soils.* Sustainable agriculture programs from Campbell Soup Co.The CTC conference will be held at the McIntosh Center of Ohio Northern University in Ada. The full schedule and registration information can be found at ctc.osu.edu. Participants may register by mail through Feb. 21 or online through Feb. 26 for $65 for one day or $85 for both days. Walk-in registration is $80 for one day or $105 for both days.Information is also available from county offices of OSU Extension.Other conference sponsors include the Ohio Corn Marketing Program, Ohio Soybean Council, Farm Science Review, John Deere, Ag Credit, Seed Consultants and the Ohio No-Till Council.last_img read more

Read More →

Ethanol advocates file suit against EPA over small refinery exemptions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA), National Corn Growers Association (NCGA), American Coalition for Ethanol (ACE) and National Farmers Union (NFU), with support of Farmers Union Enterprises, filed suit in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit to challenge several waivers from the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) granted in secret to profitable refining companies.The petitioners are challenging three EPA decisions, made under unusually clandestine proceedings, to exempt refineries in Wynnewood, Oklahoma; Cheyenne, Wyoming; and Woods Cross, Utah from the RFS requirements of the Clean Air Act. The Wynnewood refinery is owned by Wynnewood Refining Company, a subsidiary of CVR Energy, and the Cheyenne and Woods Cross refineries are owned by Holly Frontier Corporation. The companies have since estimated in financial disclosures that the exemptions have saved them a collective $170 million in compliance costs.When Congress enacted the RFS program a decade ago, it sought to protect certain small refineries from the law’s impacts temporarily by providing an exemption for refineries with no more than 75,000 barrels per day (bpd) of crude oil throughput. After a two-year blanket exemption expired, Congress also allowed those same refineries to ask for extensions of the temporary exemption if they could show that compliance with the RFS program was causing that particular facility a “disproportionate economic hardship.” Until late last year, EPA only granted a handful of exemptions per year. EPA denied many extension requests, presumably because the refineries failed to meet one or more of these requirements for an extension. In recent months, EPA has granted over two dozen exemptions — including the ones challenged here — without providing any basis for its reversal.“EPA is trying to undermine the RFS program under the cover of night,” said Bob Dinneen, CEO and President of RFA. “And there’s a reason it has been done in secret — it’s because EPA is acting in contravention of the statute and its own regulations, methodically destroying the demand for renewable fuels.“With the little information we’ve been able to piece together through secondary sources, it’s clear that EPA has been extending these exemptions to refineries that didn’t qualify for them.”Although EPA typically publishes its proposed actions and final decisions in the Federal Register, EPA has not followed those protocols for small refineries; nor has EPA even informed the public by any means that it had received or acted on such carve-out requests. Instead, the petitioners learned of the unprecedented number of exemptions second-hand, through media reports and secondary sources.“EPA left us with no choice but to challenge their systematic cuts to ethanol blending in the U.S. by distorting the intent of the law to grant secret hardship waivers to refineries which in some cases exceed the definition of ‘small’ and fall short of demonstrating ‘disproportionate economic hardship,’” said Brian Jennings, CEO of ACE. “We cannot sit by and allow EPA to violate the RFS which requires increasing the use of renewable fuels in the U.S.”The petition also notes that EPA has consistently rejected all attempts to bring greater transparency to the small refinery exemption extension process. EPA has refused to provide even the most basic information requested in Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests from RFA and other parties. More surprisingly, the Agency has also ignored demands from members of Congress for the same essential facts.“EPA’s improper handling of the RFS has significantly cut demand for biofuels grown and produced by American family farmers and their communities. The success of the law lies in the requirement that certain amounts of renewable fuel be blended into our transportation sector. Yet EPA has unlawfully allowed massive refineries to skirt compliance with these requirements, effectively reducing the amount of renewable fuels blended into the transportation sector by more than one billion gallons. These actions must be reversed immediately,” said Roger Johnson, President NFU.The petitioners are not challenging EPA’s underlying authority to exempt certain small refineries; rather they are challenging three granted exemptions as abuses of EPA’s authority. EPA should be forced to explain why an otherwise profitable refinery faces disproportionate hardship from compliance with the RFS. We want EPA to explain why it is reasonable for HollyFrontier, which apparently could not afford to comply with the RFS, could nonetheless afford to undertake a $1 billion stock share repurchase program during the same time—and that’s before the company received over $300 million in tax cuts last year. Likewise, the petitioners would like to understand how EPA could find hardship at CVR Energy, which reported a $23 million profit in the biofuels credit market in the first quarter of 2018 due to what it called a lower RFS obligation.“With their rapidly rising profits, it’s difficult to see what economic hardship these refineries are facing. The apparent lack of hardship raises serious questions of why EPA granted these exemptions, which is compounded by the fact that there is zero transparency in EPA’s small refinery exemption process,” said Kevin Skunes, president of the National Corn Growers Association. “America’s corn farmers, who are expecting their fifth consecutive year of low commodity prices and who are experiencing the lowest net farm incomes since 2006, understand economic challenges. When refineries are reporting profit increases and repurchasing stock shares, we expect EPA to explain why these refineries were granted exemptions from their RFS volume obligations.”In practice, EPA is attempting to use the small refinery exemptions to waive a significant part of the annual volumes of renewable fuel that are otherwise required to be blended into transportation fuel. Based on EPA data, RFA estimates that small refinery exemptions granted for the past two years have effectively reduced volumes of renewable fuel by as much as 1.6 billion gallons. In enacting the RFS program, however, Congress did not envision the small refinery exemption process would be abused in such a way.last_img read more

Read More →

Bucks re-sign 40-year-old guard Jason Terry

first_imgEthel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors APMILWAUKEE — The Milwaukee Bucks have re-signed Jason Terry after the veteran guard shot 42.7 percent from 3-point range last season.The Bucks announced the contract Monday night. There was no word on the length or value of the deal.ADVERTISEMENT Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans The 40-year-old Terry is beginning his 19th season in the NBA. He appeared in 74 games with the Bucks last year and averaged 4.1 points in 18.4 minutes per game. He also made 73 3-pointers in 171 attempts from beyond the arc.The 6-foot-2 Terry, who was selected by Atlanta with the 10th overall pick in the 1999 draft, has career averages of 13.8 points and 3.9 assists in 1,359 games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups PBA teams not obliged to lend players to PH squad for Champs Cup, says Reyes MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Heat raise Chris Bosh’s No. 1 jersey to the rafters

first_imgFormer Miami Heat player Chris Bosh’s jersey is raised at the team’s retirement of his jersey at halftime of an NBA game between the Heat and the Orlando Magic, Tuesday, March 26, 2019, in Miami. Bosh played 13 seasons, the first seven in Toronto and the last six in Miami. He averaged 19.2 points and 8.5 rebounds, was an All-Star 11 times and won two championships.(AP Photo/Joe Skipper)MIAMI — Chris Bosh stood at center court, looked out at the Miami Heat fans and just let the words flow. He spoke about his health scare in 2015. He spoke of his grandfather, the one he called Daddy Jack, the one who told his first grandson that he was going to be special one day.And was Daddy Jack ever right.ADVERTISEMENT Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss IOC lifts threat to remove weightlifting from Paris Olympics Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event LATEST STORIES In Heat history, his grandson is now officially immortal.Wearing a Heat championship ring on both hands, Bosh watched a giant banner bearing his name and No. 1 raised to the rafters of AmericanAirlines Arena on Tuesday night — then delivered an emotional address to the crowd, part of it even in Spanish as a show of respect to the Latin culture of Miami.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“My name, my family name up here, that’s something I used to get laughed at for dreaming of,” Bosh said. “So never let anyone tell you that you can’t accomplish your dream. Those four letters on the back of that jersey are my wife’s name, my kids’ name, my father’s name, my grandfather’s name. We’re not just carrying on for another generation. But now, Daddy Jack, we’re up there forever.”The ceremony came a little more than three years after Bosh played his final game of a 13-year career, 11 of those good enough for All-Star nods, four of them culminating in trips to the NBA Finals, two of them capped by championships. He is the fourth player to have his number retired by the Heat, joining Alonzo Mourning, Tim Hardaway and Shaquille O’Neal. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Wade introduced Bosh, telling stories of how he learned Spanish off Rosetta Stone CDs and how he became an outstanding self-taught guitar player who wound up jamming with the legendary Buddy Guy. He also talked about how much he admires the way Bosh embraces being a father and husband.“The person who made the ‘Big 3’ era legendary,” Wade said.Spoelstra tells stories of his time with Bosh all the time. One of his favorites — the night Bosh, after a playoff loss in Indiana put the Heat down 2-1 in a series, knocked on the door of his hotel suite at 2 a.m. with beers in hand. They sipped and talked for 45 minutes, not a word said about basketball. The Heat won Game 4, and the series.“If you want to understand our culture and what we’re about, there’s nothing better than a night like tonight,” Spoelstra said.The Heat also presented Bosh with a $50,000 gift for his foundation and a one-of-a-kind guitar designed by his friend Rey Jeffet Jr. And in his remarks, Bosh detailed how much his first health scare in 2015 — caused by a blood clot, just like how his career ultimately ended in 2016 — was ultimately aided by Heat fans.The team sent thousands of get-well cards from fans to Bosh’s home. He read them all.“Those letters pushed me to get back on this court,” Bosh said. “Those letters inspired me to get back up and walk across the room when I didn’t think I had the energy to do it.”For a time, he and the Heat were estranged. Bosh wanted to keep playing. The Heat didn’t feel his health issues would allow that. Eventually, the sides reached an understanding and then they finally began talking again.Now he’s back in the Heat family, forever.“I feel like I can officially, officially, officially move on,” Bosh said. “It all happened really fast, but we’re here. I’m so happy. And we get to move on into the next life together.” “Forever, and for always, a lifer of the Miami Heat,” Heat President Pat Riley said, moments before Bosh’s banner was unfurled and hoisted.Riley called Bosh’s rebound and assist late in regulation of Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals — the ones that set up Ray Allen’s game-tying, series-saving 3-pointer — the biggest in Heat history. Bosh went a step further.“The biggest rebound in NBA history,” Bosh said.There will be, at minimum, three more Heat jersey retirements in the not-so-distant future — Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and Udonis Haslem are all locks to see their name and number swaying over the court not long after their careers end.Former Miami Heat player Chris Bosh reacts at the team’s retirement of his jersey at halftime of an NBA game between the Heat and the Orlando Magic, Tuesday, March 26, 2019, in Miami. At right is Heat owner Micky Arison. Bosh played 13 seasons, the first seven in Toronto and the last six in Miami. He averaged 19.2 points and 8.5 rebounds, was an All-Star 11 times and won two championships.(AP Photo/Joe Skipper)Wade and Haslem were on the court for the celebration. Heat coach Erik Spoelstra decided long ago that, even with Tuesday’s Miami-Orlando matchup being such a big game in terms of playoff hopes, his players were going to be out on the floor to see the Bosh ceremony.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Google Philippines names new country director Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting View commentslast_img read more

Read More →