The REITs of San Francisco

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More →

Harpers speech left much to be desired First Nations delegates say

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–Many First Nations chiefs and delegates at the Crown-First Nations Gathering in Ottawa expressed disappointment with Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s speech, even as some tried to find some hope buried in the words he delivered.Many chiefs and delegates were looking for signals in the prime minister’s speech for a new approach by his government toward First Nations issues.Harper also met with a small delegation of chiefs Monday evening who relayed some of the pressing issues facing their communities and the First Nations leaders were hoping the prime minister would respond in his speech.The prime minister also stayed longer than initially believed at the meeting and was said to be meeting with delegates late into the afternoon.For many, however, the speech felt short of expectations.Michael Bignell, a band councillor from the Opaskwayak First Nation in northern Manitoba, said he was disappointed the prime minister made no major announcement.“I was hoping for something of an announcement, of anything, like education,” said Bignell, who watched the speech on a video screen in the overflow room at the Chateau Laurier.Madawaska Maliseet Chief Joanna Bernard, from New Brunswick, said the speech fell flat.“I was not impressed. He didn’t bring anything, hope or inspiration from the future,” said Bernard, who also watched the events from the luxury hotel next to Parliament Hill.Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, however, said he saw gleams of possibility in Harper’s words.Nepinak said Harper’s comments on slowly eroding the Indian Act, instead of abolishing it, fit with his organizations call for creating a process, like a larger meeting involving premiers, to begin slowly changing the whole system.“We are not asking for a rewrite (of the Indian Act), we are asking for something new,” said Nepinak, who was in Victoria Hall to hear the prime minister’s chief first-hand. “First Nations are fully willing to participate and take on all responsibilities to that end. ”Ontario’s Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Stan Beardy, however, said he came away disappointed after hearing Harper’s speech.“We had hoped there would be an acknowledgment that these are our lands and that we have a right to benefit in jobs and training and economic benefits and job creation,” said Beardy. “Also, there is no real mention of how you are going to deal with the immediate challenges like housing.”Canupawakpa Dakota First Nation Chief Frank Brown said he didn’t really expect much from the speech and the prime minister met his expectations.“There was nothing different, nothing,” said Brown, whose Dakota community is in Manitoba. “He’s tried to announce to the world that, ‘I’m dealing with First Nations.’”Brown said his community will continue to try to generate their own revenues, outside of government funds.Brown’s community has already set up a smoke shack, which has been raided a couple of times already by Manitoba Ministry of Finance authorities. Brown said there are also plans to expand a fledgling casino to include VLTs.“We are asserting and declaring our rights,” said Brown, who was in the main hall for the meetings. “We want to generate revenue and create revenue to sustain us without federal funds and that is exactly what we are doing.”last_img read more

Read More →