Vodacom trials location-based ads

first_img2 June 2009Cellular operator Vodacom is currently conducting a trial on a new location-based advertising offering – the first of its kind in South Africa – on its mobile social network, the grid.The trial run is being conducted in partnership with Nando’s, Sportscene, Jay Jays and Cape Town-based pharmacy group Synergy. The ads are delivered within a 10-kilometre radius of the user’s location, making it possible to promote a special offer available at a specific store.“Delivering advertising which is contextually relevant is one of the key goals of any advertising … and we are launching what is likely to be the first in a range of location targeting propositions which form part of Vodacom’s overall location-based services strategy,” Vodacom Mobile Media head Rick Joubert said in a statement last week.Location-specific adsAccording to its website, the grid connects a user’s mobile phone and web browser into a social network that uses cellphone mast triangulation to detect where the user and their friends are and helps users leave notes on the places they go to.When accessing the grid through a web browser on a PC, location-specific banner ads are delivered to a user’s dashboard once logged in. A web-based location targeted ad will tell a user how far they are from the store’s physical location.On mobile phones, the grid Java application delivers location-specific text link ads to a user’s dashboard. Once a user clicks on an ad, they are taken through to the location of that store on a Grid map.Cost-per-clickThe ads are charged on a cost-per-click model, making it affordable and possible for companies and brands to tailor their advertising needs to specific stores or promotions.“The power of location-based advertising is that it suddenly makes something as global as the web incredibly local,” said Joubert, adding that this was a new way of advertising that was more like the livery of a shop-front than an anonymous and arbitrary display of commercial messaging.“It is deeply personal and actionable information.”‘Embodies youth’“Jay Jays is a brand that embodies the on the go lifestyle of the youth,” said Jay Jays merchandise manager Brendan Moran. “Now with LBS advertising, wherever they are, they know where to find us.”Nando’s Western Cape regional manager Gary Matz said his company was always looking for exciting, innovative and relevant ways of promoting the company, which was why location-based advertising caught their attention.“There’s no wastage here, the ad is relevant to the customer down to the nearest street block,” he said. “What better way to spoil our customers, than telling them that the Nando’s down the road is offering something extra special this week?”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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African Swine Fever brings destruction, possible market opportunity

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Joel Penhorwood, Ohio Ag NetAfrican Swine Fever is in the midst of causing global trouble and all signs point to it likely heading to the United States soon. The hog industry is keeping a close eye on the disease’s next move.What exactly is African Swine Fever (AFS)? As defined in Hungerford’s ­Diseases of Livestock it is: “A highly contagious fatal disease of pigs with a great propensity for international spread (Geering and Forman, 1987). It is caused by a DNA virus which is very resistant, can survive in blood at 4 degrees C for 18 months, in frozen carcasses for several years, and in uncanned hams for up to six months. It affects all classes of pigs and warthogs.”Though AFS does not affect humans, it poses considerable risk to the wellbeing of the swine industry with all hogs contracting the disease requiring termination.“When it comes to global issues right now, that is something that could be very devastating in the pork industry in the United States. The threat is very real, with approximately 12 million people going back and forth to China every year, that kind of traffic of course concerns us,” said Steve Rommereim, National Pork Board president. “We have a lot of feedstuffs that come from China when it comes to our vitamin pre-mixes and what not. Vitamins are all manufactured only in China. We’ve got a real threat there. We’re trying to determine anyway if that virus can live in the kind of products we go back and forth with. We know it’s transferred through processed meat products. If grandma goes to China to visit and brings something back, albeit illegal it happens all the time — that’s how it broke in Japan, that’s how it broke in Belgium is people bringing things across the border.“We’re working as much as we can with USDA and some of the other government agencies trying to at least get on top of what that threat looks like, what it is, and how can we prevent the spread of these foreign animal diseases.”Rommereim said the U.S. has in-depth protection procedures in place if AFS hits.“There’s going to be a total stop of movement of swine. You can imagine the disruption that would cause. Numbers thrown out — $8 billion lost the first year. This thing has no vaccine. It’s very threatening. These are the kind of things we’ve got to be able to prevent because we’ve already struggled with PEDV in the past,” he said. “We’ve determined for sure that PEDV came from China and we think almost for sure that it was brought over in feed products. How do we prevent that from happening again? There’s a lot of work being done, especially on the research side as to what can we do to stop the spread of these viruses.”Christine McCracken is senior protein analyst with Rabo AgriFinance. She noted from the marketing side how destructive AFS has been, though there is some silver lining if conditions are right.“There are massive losses throughout China — 14 different provinces affected at this point,” she said. “This includes most of the primary pork growing areas, with the exception of one. There is a lot of loss there. It’s hard to estimate exactly how much. They’re working hard to get it under control, but given the structure of the industry, that’s going to be very difficult with all the backyard operations they have in China. Our best guess is that they’ll work through and try to stamp out as much as they can, but it will be hard for them.“We think that could open the door to some imports, either from Europe, which has access. It remains active in pushing product into China, or for the U.S. longer term. We’re facing these tariffs so it’s a little hard to get direct access, but our expectation is that with some of the markets that Europe isn’t able to meet, because of the active shipment of product into China, we might pick up some of those markets. There is that kind of offset assuming that the overall global trade into China increases. We remain optimistic, but there are big losses in China right now and that’s certainly tragic for that country.”According to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, at various times throughout the 20th century, ASF has been endemic in Africa, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean. Until the last few years, outbreaks were confined to eastern and southern Africa and Sardinia. However, outbreaks in the Caucasus region and Russia have begun to spread to Eastern Europe and pose a great risk for further spread to other European Union countries.More from APHIS on their emergency management procedures for AFS in this analysis: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/emergency_management/downloads/sop/sop_asf_e-e.pdf.last_img read more

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An Interesting Moisture Problem in a Trendy Restaurant

first_imgIt looked like there were a few drops of condensation on the diffuser closest to our table, which I’ve shown in the closeup photo (see Image #2, below). I really didn’t see much on the others in that row of diffusers by the windows. The outdoor weather that day was fairly dry, with a dew point of about 61°F, so maybe there’s more condensation when the dew point is higher.Another set of diffusers near the kitchen, however, seemed to be covered with condensation. Unfortunately, I didn’t take a photo of those diffusers, but there wasn’t as much discoloration on the drywall surrounding the diffusers. More drops of water on the metal; less darkness.Finally, the indoors was at a really high negative pressure. As I left the restaurant, I had to push really hard to open the door.HypothesesOK, let’s see if we can come up with a reasonable hypothesis as to the causes of the moisture problems here. First, where is the moisture coming from? One obvious potential source is the kitchen. Cooking produces a lot of moisture. The diffusers nearer the kitchen being covered with condensation supports the idea of moisture from the kitchen.But with all that negative pressure, how would any moisture escape from the kitchen? And why would the diffusers in the bulkhead on the exterior wall have more discoloration? Let’s take the questions in order.Just having really strong exhaust hoods pulling a lot of air doesn’t mean all the moisture and contaminants get pulled in. There’s this thing called capture efficiency. It’s a measure of how much of the stuff coming off the range or out of the ovens gets pulled into the hood. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab is doing work on this topic, so maybe someday we’ll be able to select range hoods based not only on how many cubic feet per minute they pull but also their capture efficiency.Restaurant exhaust hoods probably have better capture efficiency than what you have in your home, but I didn’t get a look in there to see what theirs look like. There’s a lot going on in restaurant kitchens, and even if the hood does a good job capturing the stuff coming off the range, cooks move steaming dishes around and dishwashers also put out moisture. So, it’s certainly possible that at least some of the moisture is coming from the kitchen.But the bulkhead diffusers don’t have as much hanging condensation and they have more discoloration. I believe the moisture there is coming from above. Even with a decent air barrier, the strong negative pressure in the restaurant could be pulling outdoor air into the bulkhead. If the ducts or boots (the metal part that the diffusers attach to) aren’t well insulated, the water vapor from the outdoor air is likely to condense on their surfaces. That water drips down to the drywall, keeps it wet all summer, and the result is the discoloration you see. Using zonal pressure diagnostics, we could measure the pressure inside the bulkhead with and without the exhaust fans running to test this hypothesis.Another possibility is that the conditioned air is too cold and all the moisture is coming from indoors. Maybe the diffusers near the kitchen had more condensation just because they were closer to the air handler and the air was colder when it got there. The discoloration in the drywall would come from water on the diffusers wicking into the drywall. I don’t think this is the answer, though, because the bulkhead diffusers had more discoloration, which tells me the water is coming from above over there.Potential fixesThe first thing I’d fix in this restaurant would be the negative pressure. Commercial buildings are required by code to have makeup air, but this one clearly doesn’t have enough. Adding makeup air and reducing the negative pressure may completely solve the problem with the bulkhead diffusers. It may even solve the problem with the other diffusers if the moisture there is coming from outdoors, too.If the zonal pressure diagnostics indicates an air leakage problem in the bulkhead, and adding makeup air doesn’t solve it, then the air barrier is going to have be tightened up there. I’d probably want to get rid of that drywall anyway, because who knows how bad the problem is above?If the air temperature from the AC turns out to be too low, the air conditioning system needs to be checked to find out why. That should be an easy fix.All buildings tell a story. This one is issuing a cry for help. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. RELATED ARTICLESRaining, Dripping, Crying Duct Boots Q&A: AC register condensationKeeping Ducts IndoorsHumidity, Mold, and Indoor Air QualityPreventing Water Entry Into a HomeWhy Is It So Humid In Here?Indoor Condensation Plagues This Chicago HomeMakeup Air for Range HoodsThe Hazards of Cooking With Gas I’ve got the curse, you know. I can’t walk into a building and not check out what’s going on with ductwork, windows, and anything else that lets me apply what I know about building science.Recently, I went to lunch at a trendy restaurant near Emory University and of course looked up at the ceiling. You can see what caught my attention in photo at right. The restaurant is only three or four years old, so I’ve been watching this problem get worse for a while now.I have a few ideas about what’s happening here. Do you?The cluesBefore we get into the speculation part, though, let’s lay out the facts of the case. First, those are supply diffusers for the air conditioning system. They’re in a bulkhead over the windows on an exterior wall. The dark areas around the diffusers have been growing over the past few years. It’s hard to tell what those dark areas are, but it’s probably either dirt or some kind of microbial infestation (e.g., mold).last_img read more

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Star ideas on vacation

first_imgCheck out how the celebrities do it. Swati Gupta, 28, Creative Director, Body Craft Salon and Spa”For clothes, I usually go to Evoluzione. They have some great pieces by Sabyasachi, Rohit Bal, Gaurav Gupta and other designers. I also frequent Ffolio and Samsaara at UB City because they have very,Check out how the celebrities do it.Swati Gupta, 28, Creative Director, Body Craft Salon and Spa”For clothes, I usually go to Evoluzione. They have some great pieces by Sabyasachi, Rohit Bal, Gaurav Gupta and other designers. I also frequent Ffolio and Samsaara at UB City because they have very good collections. For home accessories, I usually go to Raintree or Good Earth. I recently came across OMA and really liked their products too.”Nimirta Lalwani, 33, Fashion designer”Bangalore is a great city for shopaholics. For bridal, designer or high end clothes, Evoluzione is a great bet. For clothes and shoes by international brands, I go to Maison and Zara. And of course, I also like to sport a lot of my own designs.”Nisha Millet, 30, Professional swimmer and former Olympian”I like Mango for casual wear and Avirate has really nice formal dresses. I usually shop in Indiranagar because there are so many places to choose from. My favourite shop in town is the Speedo store which has the best swimsuits ever.”last_img read more

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