Chorale to perform Handel’s ‘Messiah’

first_img“Messiah” is an oratorio that contains three movements, Bishop said. The Chorale will be singing most of the first two movements, for a performance that will be around two and a half hours. “It depends on how many solos we do,” she said. “We don’t do the entire piece, we kind of pick and choose.” This year’s performance is unique in that the Chorale will be accompanied by a Baroque orchestra, Bishop said. The orchestra is comprised of Notre Dame students and other musicians. “A lot of the people play with us for ‘Messiah‘ every year,” she said. “The string instruments have a different feel. We still sing with a harpsichord, but it’s really cool because it’s more historically accurate.”Director Alexander Blachly said in an email the Baroque instruments have a several advantages as accompaniment for works like “Messiah.”“Most notably, they make the phrases easier to play and easier to shape. Modern strings don’t let in enough lightness and air, and as a result the phrases tend to sound heavy and labored, even when played softly,” he said. “Certain effects, like sudden strong notes, also project better with Baroque instruments. The older instruments are not as loud as modern ones, and this has one advantage and one disadvantage: the advantage is that the sound is gentler, more voice-like.”The downside is that the Baroque instruments do not project as easily in a large hall, Blachly said, “and the players therefore have to take that into account and play with a little more projection than would be necessary on modern instruments.”“Perhaps the greatest advantage is that the Baroque instruments are pitched a half-step lower than modern instruments, with the result that the highest notes for the sopranos are easier to sing,” he said.‘Messiah’ is intended to retell the history of early Christianity, Blachly said, from the prophecies of Jesus’ birth, through the host of angels singing of his glory to the shepherds, then his Passion and suffering, and finally, the arrival of Christianity, with the anticipation of the Day of Judgment.“The Chorale sings virtually all of part one, the prophecies and birth, most of part two, Jesus’ Passion, and several numbers from part three, which looks forward to a future day in heaven when the souls will be united with Christ,” he said.  “The Chorale ends its performance with the final number of part two, the ‘Hallelujah’ chorus, which, with its trumpets, foretells the Day of Judgment.”Bishop said the piece is performed a lot at Easter time, as well, because parts of the second and third movements deal with the death of Jesus.“One of my favorite songs is a passage from the Bible that is commonly read at Christmas time, where angel comes down from heaven and there’s the shepherds watching over the flock and she announces the birth of Jesus,” Bishop said. “So there are a lot of those classic Christmas messages in it.”The Chorale has been rehearsing for the performances since November, she said. “Because we sing it every year, we normally learn it pretty fast,” she said. “The old members help carry the new members. … and it generally requires some outside time, especially for the new people.”Bishop said Chorale has a large number of new members this year. “It was really exciting to see them on Monday for the first time, get to hear us perform our choruses with the orchestra, and seeing it all start to come together,” she said. “This is my favorite thing we perform. I love it, I smile through the whole thing. I’m not normally a huge classical music person, but Handel’s ‘Messiah’ is something else.”Bishop said it has been “extra special” to sing ‘Messiah’ for the last time, especially as president of a group she loves.“I’ll probably tear up during my last ‘Hallelujah’ chorus,” Bishop said. “It’s a special group, full of my best friends. … We’re a really different group of people that are all brought together by our love of music, and I think that brings a lot of unique aspects to our group. … It’s one of those places where I always feel so comfortable, and welcomed and loved.”In addition to performing Handel’s “Messiah,” the official concert choir of the University has fall and spring concerts, Bishop said. On the last week of winter break, Chorale will tour the Midwest. “We’ll sing the ‘Hallelujah’ chorus at all our stops. I wish we got to sing more, but it’s not quite the same with just the piano. It’s when you add in the orchestra is when it really becomes something else.”Tags: chorale, DPAC, Messiah Courtesy of Mimi Michuda The Notre Dame Chorale performs Handel’s “Messiah” last year at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. The Notre Dame Chorale’s annual performance of Handel’s “Messiah” will take place at Leighton Hall in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center on Friday and Saturday evenings at 8 p.m. Tickets are $3 for students, $2 if they are bought from Chorale members.“One of the reasons I decided to try out for Chorale is because I saw we were singing Handel’s ‘Messiah.’ And I just love the ‘Hallelujah Chorus,’ and I’ve really fallen in love with all of ‘Messiah,’” senior and chorale president Erin Bishop said.last_img read more

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Local bands performing in opening day parade

first_imgCINCINNATI, Ohio — Local bands will be performing in the 98th Annual Findlay Market Opening Day Parade on Monday (4/3).East Central High School Marching Band and Guard, Jac-Cen-Del Marching Band, Franklin County High School Marching Band, and South Dearborn Marching Band will all be performing in the parade on Monday.The parade is scheduled to begin at noon.last_img

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Wenger could seek new striker

first_img Bendtner had been seen as a solid back-up to lead frontman Olivier Giroud and came off the bench to score a late goal which helped beat Cardiff on New Year’s Day, only to sprain his ankle in the process as the Gunners moved back to the top of the Barclays Premier League. Arsenal are examining the full findings of a scan, and following further consultation with specialists, Wenger is likely to have a clearer idea of the diagnosis by the time he faces the media again after Saturday’s FA Cup third-round tie against Tottenham at the Emirates Stadium. Wenger accepts whatever option he eventually decides, January is not the best time to try to land the ideal target. “Honestly, you want to keep your chances in the season at the best possible level. Is it for short term or a stop-gap? Ideally, you want a longer solution, but a longer solution looks much more difficult to find in January than a short gap,” the Arsenal manager said. “You can find a solution somewhere – a club that has financial trouble and wants to get rid of a big contract for five or six months, but to find in January exactly the player who will be tomorrow’s star on the longer term is much more difficult.” Giroud missed the 2-0 win over Cardiff because of his own minor ankle problem and has now also been hit by a sickness bug, so is not expected to play in the north-London derby. Summer signing Yaya Sanogo, meanwhile, is only just recovering from a back injury. Arsenal do have German forward Lukas Podolski fit again, but he looked rusty when deployed in a central role against the Bluebirds. Given Arsenal’s lack of extensive cover, Wenger understands should Denmark forward Bendtner – who had looked on the verge of leaving the club in the summer window – be set for a prolonged spell of rehabilitation, then the club will have no choice but to bring in reinforcements “If it is a question of up to three weeks, okay, but if it is a question of months (then) the situation is quite (different), so that is what we have to determine,” said Wenger, who played down reports Arsenal were closing in on a £2million move for Dimitar Berbatov. “We don’t rule anything out. “If Bendtner is out for a long time, that is the obvious position. We (would) have to (buy).” As well as Berbatov, Arsenal had been linked with a big-money swoop for Atletico Madrid striker Diego Costa. Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger accepts the club will have to buy a new striker in the January transfer window if Nicklas Bendtner’s ankle injury proves a long-term problem. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Layoffs in Lake Worth Beach to Help Finance Electric Utility Upgrade

first_imgThe city of Lake Worth Beach is laying off 5 city employees effective immediately, eliminating 35 jobs, and cutting $800,000 from its budget according to reports. For years, the city has been taking money from its city electric utility and using that money to run the city and not putting it back into the utility, and City Manager Michael Bornstein says something has to be done so that the city can upgrade its utility.“And we’re reversing 40-50 years of that benign neglect. If you’re not constantly maintaining and fixing and rebuilding and upgrading your electric utility, it’s deteriorating,” Bornstein said.The system is deteriorating power outages are common for customers in Lake Worth Beach.Dave Palombo owns Dave’s Last Resort and Raw Bar in downtown Lake Worth Beach.“It was bad. I mean we had power outages all the time, power surges, spikes, shorting out equipment,” Palombo told CBS12.The layoffs were effective yesterday, and the employees did not receive a severance package. “I was very surprised and a little disappointed. I had no warning. It came as a big surprise,” said Vickie Joslin, the city’s head librarian who was laid off from the city after 20 years on the job.last_img read more

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