PRINGLE: ‘I’LL GO TO JAIL RATHER THAN PAY HOUSEHOLD CHARGE’

first_imgDONEGAL South West TD Thomas Pringle today repeated his claim that he will not pay the household charge as he launched a new hotline number offering advice to those opposed to the €100 bill.The number is 1890 98 98 00. Callers will be advised on how to handle the issue. Volunteers will staff it.The ‘Campaign Against Household & Water Taxes’ group has also revealed it hopes one million people will refuse to pay the charge through holding public meetings in every major town in the country. Deputy Pringle said the number of people joining their campaign was increasing all the time and he said the rest of the country was taking heart from the stance in Co Donegal.“People are saying they are not going to be frightened by what the Government is saying, and the threats they are making against people who refuse to register,” he said.“Once the weapon of fear has been removed from the Government, the Government has no other weapon in its armoury and people are willing to stand up and be counted and they are going to not register and bnot pay the household tax, or the septic-tank charge,” he said.  © 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights ReservedThe copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law. Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailySell anything on www.donegaldailyclassifieds.comPRINGLE: ‘I’LL GO TO JAIL RATHER THAN PAY HOUSEHOLD CHARGE’ was last modified: January 11th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegaldaily.comHOUSEHOLD CHARGEThomas Pringle TDlast_img read more

Read More →

Panthers look to rebuild, compete in 2018Offensive, defensive lines key as McKinleyville looks for first win since 2016

first_imgMcKinleyville High varsity football has won just 13 games over the last five seasons and has not enjoyed a winning season since 2008. Head coach Keoki Burbank, now in his third season with the team, said his roster is full of kids who “want to see change,” and who “know they can leave a mark” in McKinleyville if they are able to be competitive week in and week out and win a number of games in 2018.McKinleyville will open its 2018 season on the road at St. Vincent de Paul, Saturday August 18 at …last_img

Read More →

Rugby, football – and a nation united

first_img9 July 2010 In 1994, when South Africa shed the shackles of apartheid, it did not mean the country was automatically set on a path of unity. Sport – starting with the 1995 Rugby World Cup, followed up by the 1996 African Nations Cup, and continuing with the 2010 Fifa World Cup – played and continues to play a major unifying role. During the apartheid years, sport was used as a major tool for resistance against the system of racial segregation, with South Africa being banned from competing on the international stage in most sporting codes – including cricket, rugby and football. These sanctions served the purpose of both highlighting the unjust system in the country at the time and of applying pressure on the National Party to end apartheid. As the first democratic president of South Africa, Mandela sought to work toward the goal of bringing together a once divided people and to lead South Africa on a path to success. In what for many seemed an insurmountable task, the Nobel Peace Prize winner did not just look to the corridors of government for a solution, but also to the playing field – a possible indication as to why South Africa has hosted so many major sporting events since.Rugby World Cup The first of many major sporting events hosted in the country was the IRB Rugby World Cup in 1995 – a tournament which saw South Africa lift the trophy at Ellis Park stadium in Johannesburg. South African cricket administrator Ali Bacher is no stranger to the importance of sport in South Africa’s history, having captained the South African cricket team in 1970 against Australia just before SA Cricket was kicked out of international participation. He also pushed for the breakdown of racial divisions in the sport, and shared a poignant moment with Mandela on the issue of sport and national unity. Bacher speaks about the mood leading up to the Rugby World Cup. This event saw calls for the removal of South Africa’s sporting emblem – the Springbok – due to its link with the predominantly white-dominated sports of the past. Mandela saw this argument as a chance to send a strong symbol to the white and Afrikaans population, many of whom feared reprisals from the apartheid years, by lending his support to their cause.Mandela’s wisdom “To give an indication of [Mandela’s] wisdom and insight, in 1995 – halfway through the Rugby World Cup – he came out publicly to support players wearing the Springbok emblem which, to many, represented a sporting code that only whites could play for in the apartheid era,” says Bacher. “A television crew came to me to ask about the response from South African cricket, and I said that we wanted a neutral emblem that would satisfy both white and black. “Soon after, Mandela invited me to lunch and he took me out onto the patio with two of my board members,” says Bacher. “He started to explain that he understood that among Afrikaans people, rugby and the [Springbok] emblem were very important.” Referring to the now famous post-match celebration in which Mandela come out onto the field wearing a South African rugby jersey with captain Francois Pienaar’s number on the back, Bacher says Mandela “told me he wore the rugby jersey and the emblem … because he wanted to thank [Afrikaans people] for their support for him as South Africa’s first black president.‘I see a difference now in 2010’ “In South Africa, the majority of the black population supported soccer, while the majority of whites supported rugby,” says Bacher. “Mandela rallied the black people to support rugby and united a country. The man that made it all happen was our revered icon, Nelson Mandela.” Reflecting on the 2010 FIFA World Cup™, Bacher says: “I see a difference now in 2010. At the grounds, thousands of whites have been dressed in Bafana Bafana clothing going out to support the national team – where previously it would be mainly black people. “I see black families and white families talking about the national team, taking pictures with each other. These are small things for people from overseas, but from a South African point of view this is very significant. “We have arrived at a state of true unification in this country.”1996 African Nations Cup Another sporting icon who has witnessed first-hand the power of sport in South Africa’s psyche is former Bafana Bafana football player, Mark Fish, who was part of the team that lifted the African Nations Cup trophy in 1996 at the very site where Soccer City stadium now stands. In another successful sporting tournament hosted by South Africa, the 1996 African Nations Cup was more than just a football tournament, as Nelson Mandela once again came out in the captain’s jersey to hand over the trophy to the victorious team. “In 1996 we represented a nation and saw what we are seeing now,” says Fish. “White people came to [the then] FNB stadium to support football and the nation. It was brilliant. Before, these people would know the rugby team, but after 1996 – with Mandela supporting the team – they knew who we were.‘We can build on this’ “It was the highlight of my football career – not winning the trophy, but seeing how people came together and united behind Bafana Bafana,” says Fish. “That’s why I think we ended up winning the tournament. The way the country got behind us was absolutely phenomenal.” Fish believes the 2010 Fifa World Cup has also had a dramatic effect on the nation. “We have seen a nation get behind Bafana; people are talking about football. The challenge for us as a nation and a footballing nation is to keep the standard that we have now reached,” says Fish. “We can build on this if we continue to work together as a nation.” Source: 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Organising Committeelast_img read more

Read More →

Multimillion-rand renewal on the go in Khayelitsha

first_img20 February 2015Cape Town is focusing on previously under-invested centres as part of its Mayoral Urban Regeneration Programme (MURP), to improve the lives of its more vulnerable residents. Khayelitsha is one of several geographic focus areas that the City has prioritised as strategic investment zones for development.In the Harare area of Khayelitsha, 17 capital projects have been implemented to date to the value of about R100-million. The infrastructure and facility investment, driven by the Violence Prevention through Urban Upgrade programme and the city’s partners, which form part of the MURP, is based on community engagement and involvement.Investments have been focused around the main pedestrian routes between Khayelitsha Station and Monwabisi Park informal settlement. Private sector partnerships, such as Grassroots Soccer, loveLife and Mosaic, have also been unlocked. These partners are helping the city to extend its services to this community.In addition, investment in community facilities and public infrastructure of more than R80-million has already been made in the Kuyasa Precinct. Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille implemented the MURP in 2012.“With the highest urbanisation rate in the country, the city requires a holistic and sustainable approach and well-planned solutions to the pressures brought on by urbanisation,” says the city’s mayoral committee member for energy, environmental and spatial planning, Johan van der Merwe.Apartheid spatial planning“These challenges are, however, compounded by the apartheid spatial planning that we see across South Africa which has resulted in a socially and economically divided urban space.“The objective of the MURP is therefore to uplift formerly neglected, under-invested areas which are regressing rapidly, and to improve safety, quality of life and the socioeconomic situation, through social partnerships – with a particular focus on the shared or public environment.“Decay does not only refer to the general grime and deterioration that comes with time, but to the erosion of the economic vitality of our economic centres across the country. That is why it is important for us to create an enabling environment which will also breed further private sector investment,” he adds.“These interventions are negotiated with communities and incorporated into community action plans or area strategies.”The city’s priority areas for urban regeneration include the Khayelitsha, Hanover Park, Gatesville, Manenberg and Athlone CBDs. The project also focuses on the CBDs of Bishop Lavis, Valhalla Park and Bonteheuwel. Furthermore, great attention is being given to the Bellville, Parow and Goodwood centres within the Voortrekker Road Corridor as well as the public transport interchanges in Harare and Kuyasa in Khayelitsha. Emphasis is also placed on the Mitchells Plain town centre, the town centres of Nyanga and Gugulethu, and those of Wesfleur (Atlantis), Ocean View and Macassar.Building a townInvestments in Harare to date include the establishment of city environmental health offices, the installation of street lighting along walkways, the development of the community library, community hall and youth centre, the construction of residential and business units, the development of a business hub with line-shops, the development of facilities at Luleka School near Mew Way, and the development of a recreational park with Fifa’s Football for Hope Centre.Investment in the Kuyasa Precinct, which is situated around the new Kuyasa railway station and serves a large section of Khayelitsha, including Enkanini, includes the construction of a regional library, subcouncil offices and the revamp of Solomon Mahlangu Hall to the value of nearly R75-million. The realignment of Walter Sisulu Drive is also under way.“There is still much work to be done in Khayelitsha and in the other priority areas across the city. While I am proud of the successes achieved, our intervention efforts are being stepped up. City departments, the Western Cape government, the private sector and the various communities have embraced this programme. Partnerships such as these are vital. The transformation of our city and the empowerment of our residents cannot be achieved without partnerships,” says Van der Merwe.Source: City of Cape Townlast_img read more

Read More →

Top stories of 2016

Share Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Our web site keeps track of the stories that generate the most interest and at the end of the year we like to review the top stories to gain insight into how to better serve readers of our web and print content and our radio listeners. Plus, it is always fun to see which story comes out on top. To revisit all of these favorite web stories and videos in the last year, look for “2016 top stories of the year” on the right side of this web page. In addition to these top posts, other noteworthy drivers of web traffic in 2016 included the Ohio and Pro Farmer crop tours, the Ohio State Fair livestock show results, and Between the Rows. Weather challenges, the tough farm economy, all things draft horse, and farm technology also garnered major web traffic in the last 12 months. Here are the 10 most popular stories of 2016. 1. Noteworthy rule changes for showing livestock in 2016This story early in the year laid out some of the specifics of new livestock rules for Ohio and the reasoning behind the rule changes. Unfortunately there were five Ohio Department of Agriculture investigations regarding livestock exhibition in 2015, up from three in 2014. In response to these types of problems, it seems that rulebooks get a bit thicker every year with regard to showing livestock and there were some notable changes last year. State Veterinarian Tony Forshey outlined changes with regard to drenching, tagging in livestock, the use of adhesives and others. Beef specialist John Grimes outlined a nice response to the rules too. 2. Tough lessons from the 80s for a new generation of hardshipsA must-read for every farmer — Les Imboden is brutally honest about the tough lessons and realities on the farm through the 1980s. Farming offers a wonderful way of life, but many have learned the hard way that it must also run as a business. The 80s changed Les Imboden’s life and his advice can change your farming operation. 3. You’re teaching my daughter what in health class??A misguided health teacher tangled with the wrong farm broadcaster when showing the film “Food, Inc.” to a sixth grade health class that included the daughter of Ty Higgins. Ty politely, but very firmly, informed the teacher and school administration exactly what he thought and he found a fairly receptive new audience. 4. The livestock barn of the future“Monoslopes are the barn of the future,” said Francis L. Fluharty, research professor in The Ohio State University’s Department of Animal Sciences. “The design has the high side of the barn facing south or southeast, which allows the sun to reach almost all the way through the barn in the winter, having a warming effect on the cattle and keeping the bedding pack drier.”Then, in the summer, most of the barn is under shade and the slope to the roof creates constant airflow through the building to reduce heat stress. The open design of monoslope barns is also beneficial in keeping cows dry and better suited to handle the wind. 5. Piketon farmer’s ingenuity scores him a U.S. patentOne hot summer of dealing with the task of connecting his old 330 John Deere hay baler’s driveshaft to the PTO of his John Deere 6230 was quite enough for 80-year-old Roy Noel. As Noel was working on his rolling-hill farm in Pike County, he came up with a solution for this painstaking chore and a handy tool worthy of a U.S. patent. 6. An open letter to Wood County Fair youth exhibitorsIn response to activists that petitioned to end a 50-year tradition of the “Catch a Pig” event in Wood County, Ty Higgins wrote an open letter encouraging the youth exhibitors to represent agriculture well despite the off-color picket signs and questionable tactics employed by protesters. This is definitely worth a read for all youth exhibitors both in Wood County and around Ohio. 7. The race from Darke County to Rio: Former hog showman turns OlympianIn what was maybe my all-time favorite story interview, I sat down with runner Clayton Murphy just a few weeks before he left to compete in the 2016 Olympics. The former Darke County Fair and Ohio State Fair hog showman then went on to win a bronze medal. It was a real honor and privilege to meet this humble young man who represented Ohio agriculture in an impressive manner on the international stage. 8. If a farmer became President…Though we tried to mostly stay out of the historically ridiculous 2016 presidential campaigns, it would be impossible to cover the last year of news without some references. Ty Higgins’ take on how things could be different if a farmer resided in the White House was a very popular post leading up to Election Day. 9. Honey I shrunk the combineIt seems like every farm show across the U.S. was unveiling the biggest and best technology and machinery agriculture has to offer, but at some of these shows farmers and farm enthusiasts alike were getting a glimpse at something a little bit tinier. Kansas farmer Alan VanNahmen has built one-quarter and one-third scale replicas of a John Deere combine. The idea came to VanNahmen as he was working at Machinery Link, a company that started as a combine leasing business to help reduce farmers’ operating expenses.“The company I was working for was trying to shrink the cost of combines and harvesting, so I decided to create a quarter-scale John Deere combine to help get that message out,” VanNahmen said.The FarmBuddy combine was born. 10. The intrigue of a2 milkJoel Penhorwood cracked into the top 10 this year with his fascinating story on dairy farmer Ray Jackson in western Logan County who is looking to diversify his product with what may be a trend on the horizon for the industry — something called a2 milk.Regular cow’s milk is about 85% water. The rest consists of lactose, fat, proteins, and more. About 30% of the total protein in that assembly is made up of beta-casein. Two variants of this protein are found in cow’s milk, a1 and a2. Cows are genetically predisposed to produce milk with either a1 or a2 proteins, though a new trend has recently raised the eyebrows of dairy farmers looking to cows that can produce a2 without any a1 beta-casein for a potential new niche market. read more

Read More →

How to Attach a Thick Layer of Exterior Insulation

first_imgSupporting the furring strips from above or belowTyler isn’t sure the sections of PVC pipe would do much to prevent sag, but he introduces another idea: installing a ledger to create a 1/4-inch lip for the rainscreen battens to rest on, transferring the load directly to the foundation.Malcolm Taylor suggests that the furring strips also could be supported from above.“What about adding additional support for the battens by blocking out 6 inches at the soffit and fastening the top of the battens to this? I’ve seen this done with 3 inches of exterior insulation — not with 6, though. It wouldn’t be much help where the battens weren’t long enough to span from roof to foundation, or under windows, but two nails should provide somewhere around 200 lb. of additional shear strength to each batten.”While both options might work, Stoller would rather devise a system that is self-supporting. There are just too many challenges in establishing support at the top or bottom of a wall.“So, I am left with the rainscreen needing to support itself solely based on its attachment to the framing,” Stoller says. “Reviewing the tables which I have attached [see Image #2, below], it looks like the combined weight of the siding (most will be HardiePlank) and the furring, we are at just under 3 pounds per square foot.“ComfortBoard’s density is listed as 8 lb./cubic foot so at 6 inches thick, that is 4 lb./square foot. If I have rainscreen battens spaced 24 inches on-center horizontally, and the screws are every 24 inches vertically, that means that each screw is carrying the load of 4 square foot. The total weight of all materials being supported in a 4 square foot area is 28 pounds. Quite a bit.”With that in mind, Stoller mulls the possibility of beefing up the rainscreen battens by switching from 1x3s to 1x4s, increasing the surface area for spreading the loads by 30% and allowing Stoller to torque the fasteners down tighter, another hedge against deflection.Tighter spacing for the fasteners, possibly 19 1/4 inches instead of 24 inches, and the use of Cascadia Clips at certain intervals along the wall, also might help. The clips aren’t cheap (about $6 Canadian a pop) but are not as expensive as Stoller had feared.Roxul offers its own suggestions in a technical bulletin published at its website, Chris M says. For thicknesses over 4 inches, the company recommends input from an engineer. RELATED ARTICLES Adding a layer of insulation to the outside of a house, over the wall sheathing, makes all kinds of sense from an energy perspective. But the thicker the layer, the more challenging becomes the actual means of attaching it to the building.In a post in the Q&A forum at Green Building Advisor, Burke Stoller shares some of his concerns, as well as a proposed solution. Stoller is working out the details for a 6-inch-thick layer of Roxul ComfortBoard mineral wool, consisting of two layers of 3-inch-thick panels, each 2 feet by 4 feet.“My concern is that with such a substantial thickness of ComfortBoard, there is a potential for faster ‘sag’ through this, or durability issues during seismic events,” Stoller writes.“On many of our projects, we have screwed our vertical cedar 1×3 rainscreen material directly through a single, thinner layer of the ComfortBoard directly into the framing,” he continues. “With these thinner layers (2 inches or less), the assembly seems reasonably solid and durable once all the rainscreen strips are attached. It does require some fussing around with sucking screws in and out to keep all of the strips co-planar and flat, but it’s not too bad.”But a 6-inch layer of insulation poses different challenges. Deflection over the long term may threaten the durability of the attachment.Stoller’s proposed solution is to insert lengths of 3/4-inch schedule 40 PVC pipe through the insulation and then run long screws through the pipe as he attaches his rainscreen batten. “What do people think?” he asks. “Would this work, or does it just seem like a lot of work that won’t actually provide any resistance to sag, or deflection? Also, I am wondering if I’d be best served by using 7 7/8-inch-long GRK screws, or 9 3/4-inch GRK screws? The former provides 1 3/8 inch of embedment, while the latter would provide 3 inches of embedment.”That’s the topic for this Q&A Spotlight. What about considering other wall assemblies?Stoller’s ultimate goal is to build houses that will last a century without rotting, and to accomplish that in the rainy Pacific Northwest seems to require exterior insulation.“I am starting to envy those people that live in cold, dry climates where they can just built a dead simple double-stud wall packed with cellulose and throw a poly vapor barrier on the inside, and not have a thing to worry about!” he says. “In the Pacific Northwest, however, the reports I have read strongly caution against double-stud walls because of the extremely high and frequent potential for prolonged backside of sheathing condensation during the winter.“So, if we want to build houses that will last 100 years without rotting, we seem locked in to some kind of exterior insulation,” he adds. “If one decides to use mineral wool, for various reasons, it would be great to find some sort of solution that we could present as reasonably affordable to our clients for attaching that product without breaking the budget to do so.”As attractive as double-stud walls might be, an article posted by Building Science Corporation (BSC) has warned him off because of dramatically higher potential for moisture condensation on sheathing during the winter.Don’t give up on the idea, writes Kevin Zorski.In particular, he points to a wall described by a BSC document with 7 1/2 inches of cellulose on the outside of the sheathing, so that the cellulose keeps the layer warm and out of danger for condensation. The taped air barrier is located in the middle of the wall. BSC has warned against the wall in that climate, but Zorski doesn’t understand why.Stoller says he sees the problem with two double-stud walls discussed in the BSC report, even though they differ in their drying potential.“I am starting to think I might just put a dart board up on the wall with a bunch of thermally optimized assemblies on there and let chance make my decision,” Stoller says. “Then, when I am grumbling later about how miserable the details are to actually build, I can blame the dartboard instead of my poor decision-making skills!”There are, however, many variations on double-stud walls, as GBA readers point out, and the more Stoller weighs his options, the more it seems that his original idea of using 6 inches of exterior mineral wool insulation is doomed to failure from an economic point of view.“It is a fantastic wall in terms of performance, but the fastening of the rainscreen and the incumbent detailing around openings are becoming so complicated that the cost seems to be getting out of hand,” he says. When he adds it all up, the insulation alone will cost some $20,000 and the system of fastening the furring strips over it would add another $5,500 to $10,000. Wrapping an Older House with Rock Wool Insulation Installing Mineral Wool Insulation Over Exterior Wall SheathingFastening Furring Strips to a Foam-Sheathed WallHow to Design a WallMonitoring Moisture Levels in Double-Stud WallsLstiburek’s Ideal Double-Stud Wall Design Building Science Corp.: Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing Residential Insulated Sheathing – Design Guideby John Straube Roxul Report: Fastener Guidelines Roxul: Cladding Attachment and Support Structural Testing of Screws Through Thick Exterior Insulation Building Science Corp.: High-R Walls for the Pacific Northwest — A Hygrothermal Analysis of Various Exterior Walls Systemscenter_img Consider another type of screwGBA senior editor Martin Holladay steers Stoller to an article describing a project in which Mark Yanowitz attached 6 inches of exterior mineral wool insulation. He did not use standoffs, as Stoller is proposing, but he did use a different type of screw: fasteners made by Heco Topix.[Editor’s note: For very useful recommendations for the type of screw to use, and how many screws to use, when installing furring strips over 6 inches of mineral wool, see Comment #20 by John Straube at the bottom of this page. Note also Burke Stoller’s useful summary of data and recommendations in Comment #34.]Heco Topix fasteners are distributed by a company called Small Planet Supply. Michael Maines suggests that a structural engineer on staff probably would be able to suggest a fastener pattern. Some of the fasteners might be installed at an angle, he adds, an idea fleshed out by Charlie Sulllivan, who notes that two screws installed per location, one angled up and the other down, would add strength.“If you put in two screws, one angled up and one angled down, you can make a triangle with the screw as two sides and a 6-inch length of either the stud or the strapping as the third side,” Sullivan writes. “That triangulation uses the screws in tension and compression to hold the weight easily, rather than using them as cantilevers where the weight is bending them and compressing the insulation. Figuring out exactly what pattern to use is a little complicated, but they have an engineer who has already figured it out available to tell you.”Or, adds Jim Tyler, Timberlok screws could be used. “When I started planning a wall assembly with 6 inches of exterior foam, the idea of hanging clapboards on furring strips held to the wall with 9-inch screws felt all wrong to me,” Tyler says. “The more I looked into the properties of the fasteners, the more comfortable I became. Timberloks or similar at a slight angle down through your furring and insulation and penetrating 1 1/2 inches into a stud should hold your siding without trouble.” High cost vs. high risk“I didn’t want this thread to be about the double-stud vs. exterior Roxul,” he adds, “as they are really apples and oranges. But the more I try to find an economical way to install a thick layer of exterior mineral wool, the more unrealistic that seems to be. It is a Tesla Model-S kind of wall, and so has those prices. The double-stud wall is perhaps more like the Nissan Leaf kind of wall. It doesn’t have all the performance characteristics of the Tesla, but is still pretty incredible at a way lower cost.”Stoller “wants to love” the exterior Roxul approach, but pauses over its practicality and its cost. He’d love to be more enthusiastic about the double-stud wall, but that, too, gives him pause for its hygrothermal performance.“Still trying to figure it all out,” he writes. Our expert’s opinionHere’s what GBA technical director Peter Yost had to say:It’s hard to imagine anything more complete than Martin’s recent article on wall design, especially because he focuses so much on double-stud versus exterior rigid insulation in above-grade walls.And comments posted by GBA readers do a good job of laying out the case for using high-performance fasteners and a fastening schedule for a substantial thickness of exterior rigid insulation, including mineral wool.It’s also hard for me to imagine anything more robust than a rainscreen over exterior rigid mineral wool assembly in any climate, so long as the water and air barriers are continuous. And for me, there is the rub: the location or plane of penetrations in the assembly — most notably windows — makes the detailing of a continuous water-resistive barrier (WRB) and air barrier challenging. Dragging head or sill flashings to align with the planes of the WRB and air barrier requires clear details and scopes of work and almost certainly a mock-up the first time around.As to the cost-effectiveness of either exterior rigid insulation or double-stud walls, high performance builders in my neck of the woods (Climate Zone 6) lean towards double-stud walls (and almost always with a smart vapor retarder).I thought it was worth sharing this wall assembly with my close friend and favorite high-performance residential architect, Steve Baczek. The detail shown in Image #3, below, is detail is for one of Steve’s Passivhaus projects on Cape Cod in neighboring Massachusetts, a climate pretty close to what you folks in the Pacific Northwest are up against. (Image #4 shows a photo of the house.)What led to the funky but very successful use of engineered floor trusses in this assembly were local code and zoning provisions. They restricted the size of the foundation, but did not apply to the above-grade walls. The use of outboard insulation maximized floor space.When I asked Steve about the premium for this solution compared to either more conventional exterior rigid insulation or a double-stud wall, he said it would be tough to imagine this as the most cost-effective approach for an unrestricted high performance design, but it solved the problem and constraints for this particular project. He was quick to add the builder loved this solution because it was easy to build, easy to line up detailing consistently, and was high-quality, particularly over the long term.Like Burke Stoller, I don’t understand why Wall 15 in the Building Science Corporation report cited above does so poorly with the potential for condensation in winter. It would seem the first condensing surface is substantially warmed by the exterior rigid insulation. I have an email into the paper’s authors, but have not heard back yet. I’ll let you know what I hear. Roxul_Cladding_Attachment_and_Support.pdflast_img read more

Read More →

Fixing’ fears kept ICC on its toes this World Cup

first_imgThere are rumours that the India-Pak semi-final came under the scanner.The world Cup final will be played today, just five days ahead of the 11th anniversary of the Hansie Cronje matchfixing revelation made by the Delhi Police. While the game has moved on since 2000, with Twenty20 format and ‘Dil Scoop’ shots having come to stay, the stain of match-fixing hasn’t completely vanished.Even as the World Cup final is played in Mumbai, the sleuths of the Anti-Corruption and Security Unit (ACSU) of the International Cricket Council (ICC), besides several Indian lawenforcement agencies, are on the alert to crack down on those involved in betting on the game. Some people are quietly claiming that the India-Pakistan semi-final on Wednesday was under the shadow of doubt, but as always no proof is forthcoming.Since April 7, 2000, when KK Paul, then joint commissioner of Delhi Police, announced that South Africa captain Cronje (he has since died) and some of his teammates were involved in fixing a One-day International series against India in March 2000, stakes in the game have risen at a mind boggling rate.With millions and millions of dollars at stake in the sport and with the ICC and other agencies keeping a close eye on players and those around them, there is strict vigilance all the time.But people involved in the fixing business have changed some nomenclature, with spot- fixing and spread-betting becoming the more fashionable words.Even during this World Cup doubts were raised over a few individual and team performances, but the ICC, which now has a pro-active and independent anti-corruption setup, was quick to deny any wrongdoing.advertisementOff the field, several cases of illegal betting have been busted by the Indian police during the World Cup and even on a global stage some people still approach/ lure players as was evident in the Mazhar Majeed case involving members of the Pakistani team during a series in England last year.For the ongoing World Cup, almost the entire ICC ACSU team has been camping in India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, keeping a close watch on the matches and goings-on surrounding them. But members of ACSU are not ready to speak on their success rate. When contacted, Ravi Sawani, general manager and chief investigator, ACSU, excused himself, saying that he was not allowed to speak to the media. “I apologise for not being able to speak on this. My remit says that I cannot speak to the press,” he said.Even the BCCI’s permanent security advisor Ranjit Kumar Das, a retired police officer, isn’t willing to comment. “Even if I am happy, I am not authorised to share it with the press,” he said.Under Jagmohan Dalmiya’s presidentship, the ICC constituted Anti-Corruption Unit (ACU) – it later became ACSU – with British top cop Paul Condon heading it. “The ACU is a well organised setup. And in the past some international sports federations, including tennis, benefitted after studying ICC’s anti-corruption template.Sawani’s predecessor at ACSU, Jeff Rees, a former British police officer, joined as director of the world tennis bodies’ Tennis Integrity Unit to check corruption in the sport,” a former ICC top official told Mail Today . KK Paul, who joined the Union Public Service Commission after retiring as Delhi police commissioner, said he follows the game but not the developments in match-fixing or betting. ” What I can say is that Condon interacted with me in Delhi a few times when I was in the service,” said the man who never misses a game of cricket and will be watching the final too.===Large-hearted Kapil never fails his friends Legendary Kapil Dev’s fans know him as a talented all-rounder and the man who captained India to the World Cup title in 1983. Now a successful businessman, Kapil is involved several other projects.But he hasn’t forgotten his friends from his playing days, especially those who played with him for Haryana. Wicketkeeper Salim Ahmed, who took many catches off Kapil’s famous outswingers, received a boost a few days ago when the former India captain promised to help the students of DNS College of Engineering & Technology in Amroha, near Delhi, get jobs after graduating from the institution Ahmed has established.”Kapil met students of my college and promised them that he would help them find jobs once they complete their education. We have been friends for many years and I know Kapil always lives up to his promise,” Ahmed told Mail Today .===Help thy neighbour When will Bangladesh play their first Test match on Indian soil? Almost 11 years ago they got the elite status, with the BCCI – more specifically, Jagmohan Dalmiya as ICC president – leading the campaign. But since then successive BCCI set-ups, which include Dalmiya as board president (2001- 2004), have given them a royal ignore.advertisementIt’s an open secret that when Dalmiya was staking his claim for the post of ICC president, he needed votes of member countries and apparently promised Bangladesh goodies (read exposure through matches and other help).But once he ascended to the ICC throne (1997-2000) and even later when he became BCCI president, Bangladesh remained isolated. They last played a match in India almost 13 years ago.An indebted Bangladesh Cricket Board is too overawed of the BCCI, to ask the big brother to invite its team to play with the Indian team. When asked about his anomaly, BCB senior vice-president Mahbubul Anam said: “We are talking to them for a series.” He hardly sounded convincing.===Chappell’s wife turns nostalgic Wednesday’s India-Pakistan semi-final made many people turn nostalgic and recall the Indian team’s tours of Pakistan in 2004 and 2006. On the second tour, Indian team coach Greg Chappell’s wife Judith accompanied him and thoroughly enjoyed it and even made a scrap book on the tour. Among the souvenirs she collected during that tour was a half-smoked cigar of the then Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf, who had left it in the ashtray during a match he came to watch.Judith can still recall a sight that is firmly etched on her mind. “Travelling in the Indian team bus from Lahore to Faisalabad, we were thrilled to see the excitement of the local people lining the road into town. One moment, in particular, stood out for its poignancy and humour.In the crowd a man with a big, toothless grin on his face, standing proudly at the rear of his empty, horse- pulled cart waved at us as the traffic policeman himself let us know that all was well just by the expression in his eyes and bearing the widest grin on his face,” she recalls. “In a split second of my noticing this, Sachin Tendulkar turned around to face Greg and I with a twinkle in his eye.He too had seen the joyous, excited welcome of this man towards the Indian team – one of many wonderful moments which endeared us to the people of Pakistan.”last_img read more

Read More →