Pasadena Sees 2 Weeks Without a COVID-19 Fatality; 6 New Cases Reported

first_imgCommunity News Pasadena Sees 2 Weeks Without a COVID-19 Fatality; 6 New Cases Reported By BRIAN DAY Published on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 | 4:20 pm More Cool Stuff Health officials reported a half-dozen new COVID-19 infections on Wednesday, as the city saw two full weeks without a reported fatality, authorities said.A total of 2,254 novel coronavirus infections and 111 deaths have been reported in Pasadena since the onset of the pandemic in March, according to city data. The last COVID-19 death in the city was reported on Aug. 5.City spokeswoman Lisa Derderian said she welcomed the news, but urged the public to remain focused and not backslide on the social distancing measures that appear to be making an impact.“That’s finally a positive milestone, but we need to maintain zero fatalities for several weeks to declare defeat over the virus,” Derderian said.Labor Day weekend is fast approaching, and Derderian said thus far, virus surges have coincided with holidays.“These long weekends bring higher numbers after the fact, as much as we instill the need to avoid gatherings and take other precautions that are proving to be effective,” she said.Wednesday’s data brought the city’s seven-day average daily case rate down a percentage point to 15.4.Pasadena saw a peak of 80 cases reported on May 20, the data shows. The highest single-day death toll of eight fatalities was reported on April 30.Huntington Hospital data showed 36 COVID-19 patients being treated on Wednesday, with six tests pending.Los Angeles County public health officials reported 1,956 new infections and 61 additional deaths. The count included about 100 cases that were backlogged from the previous day.In all, the county had seen 225,827 infections and 5,392 deaths, according to the L.A. County Department of Public Health.There were 1,378 COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the county on Wednesday, with 32 percent of them in intensive care units, according to the agency.With more than 2.1 million tests administered, L.A. County’s overall positivity rate remained at 10 percent.The California Department of Public Health announced 6,164 new infections statewide on Wednesday, along with 181 deaths.The state had recorded a total of 638,831 cases of COVID-19 and 11,523 deaths.Officials reported 6,479 Californians were hospitalized, with confirmed or suspected coronavirus, with 1,761 of them — or 27 percent — being treated in intensive care units.The state’s positivity rate over the past seven days stood 6.3 percent, officials said. The 14-day rate was 6.6 percent.Based on available data, Los Angeles County accounted for 35 percent of California’s COVID-19 infections and 47 percent of the state’s fatalities. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Make a comment STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business News CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday HerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Metabolism-Boosting Foods For Weight LossHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Easy Tips To Help You Reset Your Sleep ScheduleHerbeautyHerbeautycenter_img Community News Top of the News Community News 20 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week last_img read more

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Muting the Mozart effect

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqSY3INIxAs” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/oqSY3INIxAs/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Children get plenty of benefits from music lessons. Learning to play instruments can fuel their creativity, and practicing can teach much-needed focus and discipline. And the payoff, whether in learning a new song or just mastering a chord, often boosts self-esteem.But Harvard researchers now say that one oft-cited benefit — that studying music improves intelligence — is a myth.Though it has been embraced by everyone from advocates for arts education to parents hoping to encourage their kids to stick with piano lessons, a pair of studies conducted by Samuel Mehr, a Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) doctoral student working in the lab of Elizabeth Spelke, the Marshall L. Berkman Professor of Psychology, found that music training had no effect on the cognitive abilities of young children. The studies are described in a Dec. 11 paper published in the open-access journal PLoS One.“More than 80 percent of American adults think that music improves children’s grades or intelligence,” Mehr said. “Even in the scientific community, there’s a general belief that music is important for these extrinsic reasons. But there is very little evidence supporting the idea that music classes enhance children’s cognitive development.”The notion that music training can make someone smarter, Mehr said, can largely be traced to a single study published in Nature. In it, researchers identified what they called the “Mozart effect.” After listening to music, test subjects performed better on spatial tasks.Though the study was later debunked, the notion that simply listening to music could make someone smarter became firmly embedded in the public imagination, and spurred a host of follow-up studies, including several that focused on the cognitive benefits of music lessons.Though dozens of studies have explored whether and how music and cognitive skills might be connected, when Mehr and colleagues reviewed the literature they found only five studies that used randomized trials, the gold standard for determining causal effects of educational interventions on child development. Of the five, only one showed an unambiguously positive effect, and it was so small — just a 2.7 point increase in IQ after a year of music lessons — that it was barely enough to be statistically significant.“The experimental work on this question is very much in its infancy, but the few published studies on the topic show little evidence for ‘music makes you smarter,’” Mehr said.To explore the connection between music and cognition, Mehr and his colleagues recruited 29 parents and 4-year-old children from the Cambridge area. After initial vocabulary tests for the children and music aptitude tests for the parents, each was randomly assigned to one of two classes, one that had music training, or another that focused on visual arts.“We wanted to test the effects of the type of music education that actually happens in the real world, and we wanted to study the effect in young children, so we implemented a parent-child music enrichment program with preschoolers,” Mehr said. “The goal is to encourage musical play between parents and children in a classroom environment, which gives parents a strong repertoire of musical activities they can continue to use at home with their kids.”Harvard study on music and cognition Children and parents take part in a music training class as part of a Harvard study that explored whether studying music improved cognition among young children.Among the key changes Mehr and his colleagues made from earlier studies were controlling for the effect of different teachers — Mehr taught both the music and visual arts classes — and using assessment tools designed to test areas of cognition, vocabulary, mathematics, and two spatial tasks.“Instead of using something general, like an IQ test, we tested four specific domains of cognition,” Mehr said. “If there really is an effect of music training on children’s cognition, we should be able to better detect it here than in previous studies, because these tests are more sensitive than tests of general intelligence.”The study’s results, however, showed no evidence for cognitive benefits of music training.While the groups performed comparably on vocabulary and number-estimation tasks, the assessments showed that children who received music training performed slightly better at one spatial task, while those who received visual arts training performed better at the other.“Study One was very small. We only had 15 children in the music group, and 14 in the visual arts,” Mehr said. “The effects were tiny, and their statistical significance was marginal at best. So we attempted to replicate the study, something that hasn’t been done in any of the previous work.”To replicate the effect, Mehr and colleagues designed a second study that recruited 45 parents and children, half of whom received music training, and half of whom received no training.Just as in the first study, Mehr said, there was no evidence that music training offered any cognitive benefit. Even when the results of both studies were pooled to allow researchers to compare the effect of music training, visual arts training, and no training, there was no sign that any group outperformed the others.“There were slight differences in performance between the groups, but none were large enough to be statistically significant,” Mehr said. “Even when we used the finest-grained statistical analyses available to us, the effects just weren’t there.”While the results suggest studying music may not be a shortcut to educational success, Mehr said there is still substantial value in music education.“There’s a compelling case to be made for teaching music that has nothing to do with extrinsic benefits,” he said. “We don’t teach kids Shakespeare because we think it will help them do better on the SATs. We do it because we believe Shakespeare is important.“Music is an ancient, uniquely human activity. The oldest flutes that have been dug up are 40,000 years old, and human song long preceded that,” he said. “Every single culture in the world has music, including music for children. Music says something about what it means to be human, and it would be crazy not to teach this to our children.”The study was supported by funding from the Dana Foundation, and inspired by the work of William Safire.last_img read more

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Supercharging AI and HPC Engines with Dell Technologies and NVIDIA

first_img Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 3:17Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -3:17 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsdefault, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 1:54Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -1:54 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsen (Main), selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Dell Technologies and NVIDIA deliver unprecedented acceleration and flexibility for AI, data analytics and HPC to tackle some of the world’s toughest computing challenges.Dell Technologies has long been on the forefront of innovation when it comes to artificial intelligence and high performance computing, and in many cases NVIDIA has been right there with us.This close relationship of two global technology leaders got started well before 2013, when Dell and NVIDIA worked together to advance the concept of a dense GPU platform, which would emerge in the Dell EMC PowerEdge server family. This concept came to market in 2014, when Dell introduced the industry’s first dense 1U four-GPU platform — the Dell EMC PowerEdge C4130 server.This legacy of innovation continued in the days that followed, and in 2016 Dell Technologies became the first OEM to support NVIDIA SXM2 technology. This technology, which is used in the NVIDIA Tesla V100 SXM2 GPU, enables high-speed, direct GPU-to-GPU communication via the NVIDIA NVLink interconnect.The following year, in 2017, Dell Technologies became the first vendor to support the NVIDIA Volta V100 GPU in a unique, balanced CPU-to-GPU dense platform — the Dell EMC PowerEdge C4140 server. This accelerator-optimized, high-density server is built to meet the demands of cognitive computing workloads in a 1U server format that supports four GPUs.In the years since, we have built on our strategic partnership to bring new Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI to market. These offerings include Deep Learning with NVIDIA, a Dell EMC Ready Solution that provides a GPU‑optimized solution stack that helps organizations shave valuable time from deep learning projects. The Deep Learning with NVIDIA solution is built around NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs.Success storiesOver the years, the team of Dell Technologies and NVIDIA has had great success with our common customer base. Here’s a small sample of our mutual successes:We worked closely on a major expansion of the HPC5 supercomputer at Eni, an Italy-based integrated energy company. This system is based on 1,820 Dell EMC PowerEdge C4140 servers, each with four NVIDIA V100 Tensor Core GPUs and two 2nd Generation Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors. With the performance of the HPC5 supercomputer, Eni’s scientists and engineers can use extremely sophisticated in-house algorithms to process subsoil data. We worked in collaboration with the Research Computing Service at the University of Cambridge to develop the Wilkes2 supercomputer, which debuted in 2017 as a TOP500 system and the largest GPU-enabled supercomputer for academic research in the UK. This system is based on Dell EMC PowerEdge servers, each with four NVIDIA GPUs. It supports a wide-range of compute- and data-intensive research, from aeronautical turbulence and automotive combustion simulations to materials modeling and medical applications.center_img We collaborated on the development of one of Canada’s most powerful academic supercomputers, the Super Cedar system at Simon Fraser University. This TOP500 system, launched in 2017, revs up scientific studies with the power of 584 NVIDIA GPUs. It is helping thousands of researchers from British Columbia and across Canada collect, analyze, share and store immense volumes of data. Market leadershipIn developing products and solutions with NVIDIA, Dell Technologies builds on a broad and deep product portfolio that spans from best-in-class servers with the latest processing architectures to leading-edge storage and networking systems, all backed by expert services.In a sign of this leadership, Dell Technologies took the top spot in both server revenue and shipments in 2019, with 20.5 percent market share and 16.3 percent market share, respectively, according to Gartner. Meanwhile, Dell Technologies  maintains “a commanding market share lead” in high-performance storage, according to a 2019 report from Intersect360 Research. The firm noted that Dell Technologies also has the No. 1 revenue share position for storage for HPC applications and  is the overall leader in total HPC solutions revenue. Looking aheadToday, we’re excited about our opportunities to support the new NVIDIA A100 Tensor Core GPU in systems, solutions and services that accelerate workloads, from edge to core to cloud, just as we support other NVIDIA GPU accelerators and technologies in a wide range of our offerings.This new GPU is designed to help users tackle some of the world’s toughest computing challenges. It delivers unprecedented acceleration at every scale for AI, data analytics and HPC. As the engine of the NVIDIA data center platform, A100 can efficiently scale up to thousands of GPUs, or it can be partitioned into isolated GPU instances to accelerate workloads of all sizes.NVIDIA reports that the A100 accelerates major deep learning frameworks and more than 700 HPC applications — and that’s one of the reasons why we at Dell Technologies are excited to incorporate this GPU in our portfolio for HPC, AI and data analytics.To learn moreFor a look at how the San Diego Supercomputer Center is capitalizing on NVIDIA GPUs in its new Expanse supercomputer from Dell Technologies, see the case study “Architecting for Mixed Workloads at Massive Scale.”last_img read more

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Millennial CEO charged with fraud

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Prosecutors alleged Wednesday the former president/CEO of the $231 million Valor Federal Credit Union in Scranton, Pa., embezzled $718,000 to pay for credit card bills, college tuition, his spouse’s birthday party and a golf tournament sponsorship.In addition to a fraud charge, Sean E. Jelen, 33, was also charged with attempted fraud for trying to steal an additional $1.1 million by creating a forged severance contract before he was fired by the board of directors in August 2015.What’s more, about five months prior to his termination, Jelen allegedly rigged Valor’s board of directors’ election by electing an individual only identified in court documents as R.T. But Jelen did this without R.T.’s knowledge. continue reading »last_img read more

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Drew Doughty has period to forget in Los Angeles Kings’ loss to Edmonton Oilers

first_imgThis one will probably stick with Drew Doughty for a while — although he’ll want to forget it as quickly as possible.The Los Angeles Kings defenseman didn’t play particularly poorly against the Edmonton Oilers on Friday night, posting a team-high 25:40 of ice time while registering four shots and finishing at plus-1, but a few minutes in the first period ruined the rest of the game for him and his team. Doughty tries to stop McDavid. #oilers #gifs pic.twitter.com/CeTp4UFdjC— OILERZ (@oilerzmedia) December 7, 2019McDavid went on to produce the game-winning assist moments later.Doughty did get a measure of redemption in the third period when he assisted on Michael Amadio’s goal to give the Kings life, but Edmonton held on for a 2-1 victory. It has been a rough season for the last-place Kings and their highest-paid player. Friday’s first period just added to the misery. Doughty’s rough stretch started midway through the opening frame when an Adrian Kempe penalty put the Oilers on a power play. With Doughty on the ice to help defend Edmonton’s man advantage, Oilers star Leon Draisaitl received the puck from teammate Alex Chiasson. Draisaitl pondered his options from the right wing before attempting to slot a cross-ice pass to a waiting Chiasson in front of goal — only to watch as Doughty inadvertently kicked the puck past Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick and into the Los Angeles net for the game’s opening goal.Minutes later, Doughty again found himself on the ice against a feared Oilers forward. This time it was Connor McDavid, whose speed is just one of the many weapons at his disposal.MORE: Ken Holland unaware of Mike Babcock’s alleged mistreatment of players in DetroitWith the entire Kings team backpedaling while McDavid entered their defensive zone, Doughty lost his footing temporarily. To his credit, the 29-year-old blueliner managed to block McDavid’s pass attempt while prone on the ice and quickly got back to his feet to try to deliver a hit on the Oilers superstar.Unfortunately for Doughty, his attempted check resulted in nothing but air as McDavid deftly avoided the challenge and sent the defenseman hard into the boards.last_img read more

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