Protesters call for Council action on mental health crisis

first_imgLimerick Post Show | Limerick Mental Health Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Advertisement Print Green Ribbon Month aims to help end stigma and discrimination about mental health NewsCommunityHealthPoliticsVideoProtesters call for Council action on mental health crisisBy Alan Jacques – October 11, 2019 180 Karen seeks mental health support for cancer patients Linkedin Twitter Text for mental health supportcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Facebook participants in the protest “Stand up for Mental Health” outside Limerick City and County Council offices on Merchant’s Quay. Photo: Cian ReinhardtTHE ‘Stand Up For Mental Health’ campaign, which last month saw protesters enter the council chambers at City Hall to call for action in Limerick, is now planning another protest.Campaigners say they have no choice but to call another protest to highlight the lack of action being taken by the local authority to address the mental health crisis in Limerick. They are insisting that the local authority needs to provide adequate funding for mental health in their upcoming budget in November.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “Limerick has twice the national average rate of suicide and has the highest rate of adolescent self harm in the country. The lack of political will at national level means the responsibility now rests on our local Council to lead the way,” said Seónaidh Ní Shíomóin, one of the campaign activists.Continue reading below…“‘The Limerick Local Economic and Community Plan 2016-2021,’ states that it aims to promote conditions in local communities to support positive mental health. It’s high time the Council actually fulfilled this commitment and put their money where their mouths are.“One of the many vacant Council-owned buildings around the city should be immediately handed over to the suicide patrols, along with funding to set it up. We also need an out of hours on-call crisis counsellor, who could operate out of this same base.“Councillors have hundreds of thousands of Euro in discretionary spending through the General Municipal Allocation, so the poor mouth won’t wash with us. We demand the political will to put their fine words on mental health into action,” she declared.Antoinette Sheppard, who attended last month’s protest at City Hall, said that families of suicide victims and activists with the campaign were given a commitment by the Council chief executive, Dr Pat Daly, to discuss possible interventions which they think would alleviate the current crisis.“We requested this meeting and have since been met with a wall of silence. This shows a blatant disregard to those families who seek action and leadership from the Council. If they continue to ignore us, we will just shout louder. This crisis isn’t going away any time soon, and neither are we,” Antoinette commented.The Stand Up For Mental Health protest will begin at City Hall, Merchants Quay on Saturday, October 26 at 12.30pm. TAGSCommunityMental HealthNewspolitics Previous articleNews Roundup October 12, 2019Next articleTechnology summit pinnacle to Richard Harris Festival Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Mental Health Charity Let’s Get Talking open new outreach in Midwest Emaillast_img read more

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Fireside Chat hosts a conversation with Cafe Dulce founder

first_img“We’re not here serving pastries and drinks and food — we serve people,” Choi said. “At the end of the day, the pastries that we make, the drinks that we slave over, the latte art that we pour that we’re proud of … that’s only as important as the person that we’re serving them to.” Choi said that he is primarily motivated by the belief that his hard work will pay off. Along with the support of his family, this belief aided him through the early days of running the cafe. Choi said that at the time, his mother was in remission from ovarian cancer, and neither his mother nor he had any prior experience in the baking industry. Although his mother had a business partner, Choi said the partner dropped out of the project three weeks before opening day, prompting himself to embark on the business venture with his mother. “I think the most important lessons I’ve learned from the speech is that it’s interesting to know that hospitality is the most important thing,” Msei said. “It’s not about the food, but about people and to have passion in the things you do.” “It’s not about the person … It’s not ‘you didn’t do this, or you did this’ … It’s more like the behavior you choose,” Choi said. When he was starting his first cafe in Little Tokyo, Choi said he found that engaging with the surrounding community is a key aspect of running a business. “So I put in my two weeks, left my job for the last time and I’ve been at Dulce since 2010 when I came on board,” Choi said. James Choi, a USC alumnus, opened the first Cafe Dulce in Little Tokyo in 2011. The cafe, which has a branch located in the USC Village, is a popular eatery for students. (Shaylee Navarro/Daily Trojan) Choi said the reason for Dulce’s popularity is its emphasis on hospitality, as the franchise aims to bring about positive change in the community. “The only thing you can do is just put your head down and work,” Choi said. “And I [couldn’t] afford to hire people, so I … physically [had to] do everything that I [could]. So literally from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., everyday for almost two years.” “Because we gave to the community, even though we didn’t have much to give, they were the ones that patronized us during those dark times, during 2011 and 2012 when it was really slow,” Choi said. Spark SC board member Ankur Rastogi, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering and computer science, asked Choi how he approaches his staff when they make mistakes. Choi said he tries to coach workers rather than punish them. Choi, who graduated from USC in 2005 with a degree in accounting, worked for the multinational professional services firm Ernst & Young. He then opened up Teuscher Swiss Chocolates in Palo Alto with his mother, eventually creating the first Dulce in Little Tokyo in 2011. Alicia Msei, a graduate student at the Marshall School of Business, said the event helped her realize the importance of incorporating hospitality in businesses. On any given day at USC Village, dozens of people stand patiently outside of Dulce waiting for their caffeine fix. Dulce’s popularity — both at USC and in Los Angeles — can be attributed to its emphasis on hospitality. In an event organized by student entrepreneurship organization Spark SC, Dulce founder and owner James Choi shared how he came to be the mastermind behind one of the most popular local cafes.last_img read more

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