Fairsharemusic launches download gift cards

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: christmas Digital Trading Faireshare Music has launched download gift cards in time for Christmas. With gift cards, available in £5, £15 and £25 versions, can be used to purchase 16 million tracks and albums that are available on the site. Half of the profits from each track sold are donated to charities including Amnesty International, War Child, British Red Cross, WWF, Sue Ryder Care and Friends of the Earth.Lee Cannon, co-founder of Fairshare Music, said: “The giftcards are a win-win situation – you get to have a great value, feel good gift and the recipient of your gift gets something they actually want.”Fairshare Music downloads sync automatically with iTunes or Windows Media player collections of music so there is no need to download new software. Prices start at 79p per track.www.fairsharemusic.com Howard Lake | 4 December 2011 | News  56 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Fairsharemusic launches download gift cardslast_img read more

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New Mississippi flag welcomed as step in reconciling state’s Confederate past

first_imgMichael Wade/Icon Sportswire via Getty ImagesBy IVAN PEREIRA, ABC News(NEW YORK) — It may be just a magnolia, but for many Mississippians, it is a symbol of a long-awaited reckoning with their state’s history.On Election Day, nearly 73% of state residents voted to change the state flag, which previously had Confederate imagery, to one that is blue, yellow and red, with the state flower in the center and the words “In God we trust.” The vote caps years of calls from Mississippi’s Black community and other groups to end the state’s attachment to its Civil War era.Those calls grew louder — and more bipartisan — this year, following the protests after George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, according to Don Shaffer, a professor and the director of African American Studies at Mississippi State University.“I think it’s already starting to indicate that changes are beginning to happen,” he told ABC News about the flag change. “The way people talk about our state is changing. Symbols matter.”In June, Republican Gov. Tate Reeves signed a bill that removed the 126-year-old flag and created a commission to come up with a new design that would be approved by voters. The commission released its design in September, and voters were asked to approve it in a ballot question.Reeves, state Democrats and state Republicans were in agreement that this move was in the state’s best interest.“This is not a political moment to me, but a solemn occasion to lead our Mississippi family to come together to be reconciled and to move on,” Reeves said at a news conference before the bill signing in June.Shaffer said various groups and organizations, including Mississippi State University and the NAACP, have called for the older flag to be removed for a long time. In 2001, a ballot initiative that would have removed the flag failed to get enough votes to pass.This time was different, according to Shaffer, because of the national conversation and protests over the summer. The professor said the calls to remove symbols and statues related to the Confederacy spoke to more residents, especially younger ones, from all backgrounds.“It was the willingness of Mississippians, both Black and white, who went out, took to the streets and protested peacefully about these issues that brought the momentum,” Shaffer said.He noted that big-name Mississippi figures, such as Mississippi State football head coach Mike Leach and University of Mississippi football head coach Lane Kiffin, publicly endorsed the change. Mississippi native Faith Hill also pushed for the flag to be removed calling the old flag “a direct symbol of terror for our Black brothers and sisters.”“You saw people you wouldn’t normally see demanding change,” Shaffer said. “We were getting allies from places and corners we weren’t accustomed to seeing.”While Shaffer noted over 27% of voters did not approve the new state flag, he predicted more people will come around when they see the benefits.Removing the flag’s Confederate connotation could attract new businesses, along with new people and economic benefits, according to Shaffer. Amazon announced on Nov. 12 it will open a new fulfillment center in Madison County that will employ 1,000 residents, according to the Madison County Development Authority.“So the way you convince those people who are not convinced is to show all of the positive changes that are occurring,” Shaffer said. “The practical kinds of changes that will occur as a result of the flag decision will be impactful.”Ultimately, Shaffer said he believes the new flag will be the jumping-off point for much-needed conversations about the state’s history, particularly in regards to experiences of the Black community. He predicted that Mississippians of all backgrounds will be ready to move forward.“Now that we’ve changed the symbolism, we have to cash in on the unity that this gesture signifies,” he said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Field hockey alumni rely on former teammates in transition

first_imgThe Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.Emma Russell wanted to see the West Coast again before leaving the United States and Syracuse. So, in late May 2016, Russell and field hockey teammate Alma Fenne headed to California where they went whale watching in Monterey, visited Yosemite National Park and stayed with Russell’s uncle for 10 days.Eventually, the two went north to Oregon to watch some friends on the Syracuse track and field team compete in the national championships. After that, the pair headed back to Syracuse one last time before Russell departed for New York City, where she boarded a flight to Ireland. This time, she only needed a one-way ticket. After calling Syracuse home for four years, Russell said it was difficult to leave. It’s more than leaving field hockey behind, 2018 alum Lies Lagerweij said. For players leaving Syracuse and their teammates and coaches, the post-graduation adjustment is difficult, Lagerweij said. Moments and rituals — like horoscope Mondays, a weekly team event at Recess Coffee where players read each other’s horoscopes — were the hardest to let go, she said. “The simple things like getting changed in the locker room and listening to music together and hanging out before games, going to Bruegger’s for breakfast, just little rituals like that,” Lagerweij said. “I miss those a lot.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLagerweij still sees former teammates Roos Weers and Borg van der Velde from time to time, since all three live in the Netherlands. And Russell visits from Ireland in her spare time. Like any alumna, Weers misses her friends from SU, but it’s Syracuse’s field hockey program that she misses most.That includes Corey Parker, the strength and conditioning coach who was key throughout Weers’ collegiate career, the woman who cleaned the locker room before the team’s 7 a.m. practices, and the lady who sat at the front desk of Stevenson Educational Center where athletes met with academic tutors.Since graduating, Russell has had to cope with a loss of team spirit and community. In addition to four hours a day on the field with her teammates, they also ate together every night.Teammates used to wander across South Campus and into Russell and Lagerweij’s apartment, which served as a meeting hub because of its proximity to Manley Field House, Russell said. Now, Russell relies on video calls to stay in touch with her teammates.“It really did take me nearly a year to kind of settle back in and kind of adjust to a new lifestyle a little bit,” Russell said.While Russell trained with the team once a week during the spring before she graduated, she talked with Lauren Brooks, an SU alum assisting the team during the fall 2015 season, about the upcoming transition. Brooks was helpful because she understood the difficulties, Russell said. Two years later, when Lagerweij wrapped up her college career, she turned to Russell with the same questions about life after graduation.Because of the team’s lack of a hierarchy, Lagerweij said that once younger players became the leaders of the team, they felt comfortable turning to former teammates for post-graduation advice.“Graduation is a very mixed feeling, because yes, you’re excited about what’s to come,” Lagerweij said. “But still it’s just really hard to leave a place where you’ve been for so long, that’s been your home for so long.”For Lagerweij, she’ll always remember the time she returned to her dorm after visiting the hospital with a knee injury. Once she opened her door, she saw all her freshman teammates with a cookie cake and a card. While on a recruiting visit to Syracuse, she didn’t believe that her team would become like family — but after her freshman season, she changed her mind. Leaving a team of people who she spent countless hours around was challenging for everyone, but Russell understood the importance of transitioning away. It takes time, Russell said, but eventually she was ready.“When everyone’s kind of moving on, it’s easier for you to, to kind of get a move on as well,” Russell said. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on August 26, 2020 at 10:34 pm Contact Thomas: [email protected] | @ThomasShults5last_img read more

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