De Beers invests $2bn in new SA mine

first_img23 October 2013De Beers, the world’s second-biggest diamond producer, began construction of a new underground mine beneath its open pit Venetia Mine in Limpopo province, South Africa on Tuesday.The Anglo-American owned miner said the US$2-billion (R20-billion) investment would extend the life of the mine beyond 2040 while replacing the open pit as South Africa’s largest diamond mine.The new mine is expected to start underground production in 2021, De Beers said, and to treat in the region of 130-million tonnes of ore containing an estimated 96-million carats of diamonds over its life span, in the process creating over 8 000 jobs directly and a further 5 000 jobs through the supply chain.President Jacob Zuma, speaking at the sod-turning ceremony in Musina on Tuesday, said De Beers’ investment, “the biggest single investment in the diamond industry in decades, signals that indeed our mining sector is poised for growth, and that it has a bright future”.Zuma said the government was investing time and effort in strengthening the mining sector so that it could contribute “to inclusive growth and jobs as envisaged in the National Development Plan”.Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu, also speaking at Tuesday’s ceremony, said the start of construction on the new mine showed that South Africa “remains an investment destination of choice,” adding that the government would continue, through legislation, to ensure that such investment “sustainably benefits mining communities and labour-sending areas”.Mark Cutifani, chief executive of Anglo American and chairman of De Beers, said Anglo American’s roots were firmly in South Africa.“Over the last 14 years alone, Anglo American has invested nearly R200-billion in South Africa, emphasising our commitment and making a real difference for South Africa and all South Africans.“The positive social impact of skills development, the acquisition of economically valuable experience, and the potential to uplift rural and sometimes poorer communities, is what exists here at the heart of Venetia.”SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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SODIAL(R) 2pcs Hair Comb Pin Accessories Plastic Women Lady Fashion Brown – Use these for work. I am a nurse so

first_imgStrong combs that can get a fantastic grip on thick/curly hair and not split.Exceptional benefit, prompt shipping.Features of SODIAL(R) 2pcs Hair Comb Pin Accessories Plastic Women Lady Fashion BrownCatch the latest trend of this year!Good for going party or banquet Delicate design, special for tasteful ladies.Fashion & practical at the same time.Beautiful and fashionable hair comb clip!Strong combs that can get a fantastic grip on thick/curly hair and not split.Strong and a superior huge sizing.Keep a french roll for a entire working day on my extremely good hair.I am a nurse so hair up with the very least bit of fuss and requirements to be comfortable, these tick all the bins.Low-priced and cheerful does the task well.I am a nurse so hair up with the very least bit of fuss and requirements to be comfortable, these tick all the bins.Keep a french roll for a entire working day on my extremely good hair.Low-priced and cheerful does the task well.Very good high-quality, little greater than envisioned but handy for. Very good top quality, small bigger than expected but helpful for placing up thicker hair of extended length. Arrived incredibly swiftly great company. Exceptional benefit, prompt shipping.Strong and a superior huge sizing.Very good high-quality, little greater than envisioned but handy for. Very good top quality, small bigger than expected but helpful for placing up thicker hair of extended length. Arrived incredibly swiftly great company.Use these for work. I am a nurse so Brilliant hair combsGood quality, little larger than expected but useful for last_img read more

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Saving Energy by Conserving Water

first_imgIt takes a lot of energy to transport and treat water in this country, and it takes a lot of water to produce the energy we use. To put this a different way: when we save water we save energy, and when we save energy we save water.Most people don’t think about this tight-knit relationship between energy and water, but public officials in a growing number of regions around the country are becoming quite aware of it. This week, I’ll examine how much energy it takes to move water and to treat both supply water and wastewater. Next week, I’ll look at how much water is used in producing our energy.The energy intensity of waterThe amount of energy needed to deliver clean water and treat that water once we’ve used it varies tremendously by region. If you live in southern California, your drinking water is pumped either from the Colorado River and its assorted reservoirs (including the nation’s largest, Lake Mead, which is now half empty) or from northern California. In either case, that water flows through hundreds-of-miles-long open aqueducts and, via pipelines, up and over mountain ranges.Averaged statewide , roughly 5% of California’s electricity is used for moving and treating water and wastewater. (The oft-quoted figure of 19% includes water heating and other things we do with water in homes, businesses, and farms.) But these figures vary widely in different parts of the state. A 2005 report from the California Energy Commission found supply and conveyance of water to range in intensity from 0 to 16,000 kilowatt-hours per million gallons (kWh/MG), while filtration and treatment varied from 100 to 1,500 kWh/MG, distribution varied from 700 to 1,200 kWh/MG, and wastewater collection and treatment varied from 1,100 to 5,000 kWh/MG. Not surprisingly, average totals are far higher in southern California (12,700 kWh/MG) than in northern California (3,950 kWh/MG).This issue isn’t limited to California. Nationwide, roughly 4% of total power generation is dedicated to pumping and treatment of water. For many cities and towns around the country, this is the largest single user of electricity. Water filtration plants and sewage treatment plants are very energy intensive. In places where desalination is needed, the energy-intensity of drinking water rises dramatically.On a per-capita basis, this energy use for water varies from about 350 kWh/year in the South Atlantic states to over 750 kWh/year in the Mountain states, according to a 2006 report by the U.S. Department of Energy. (In New England, each of us uses just under 400 kWh/year, on average.) This means, for a lot of us, our domestic water accounts for about as much electricity as our refrigerator.For most homeowners, the energy-intensity of water use is hidden in water and sewer utility bills, while those of us in rural areas who have our own water systems and onsite wastewater systems pay those energy costs directly. If you have a really deep well, water pumping costs can be one of your largest electricity demands. And while gravity-flow wastewater disposal systems (in-ground septic tanks and leach fields) use little if any energy, some of the newer “aerobic” treatment systems that work in places without suitable soils for standard in-ground systems have pumps that operate 24/7, consuming as much electricity, annually, as four or five refrigerators.The bottom line is that because there’s a lot of energy “embodied” in the water we use, we should conserve water in order to save energy. In fact, in some places, such as California, energy conservation programs provide rebates on water-conserving appliances and plumbing fixtures such as toilets and irrigation-control systems, even if those products do not use energy directly. Any conservation measure that reduces hot water use, such as low-flow showerheads, front-loading clothes washers, and efficient dishwashers, will directly save energy by reducing the amount of water we have to heat.A good starting point in saving energy by reducing water use is to look for WaterSense-listed products whenever shopping for a product covered by the EPA WaterSense program.Next week, I’ll look at the inverse of this issue: how much water it takes to produce our various energy sources and how we can conserve water by choosing energy-efficient products and building systems.In addition to this Energy Solutions blog, Alex writes the weekly blog on BuildingGreen.com: Alex’s Cool Product of the Week, which profiles an interesting new green building product each week. You can sign up to receive notices of these blogs by e-mail—enter your e-mail address in the upper right corner of any blog page.Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, LLC and executive editor of Environmental Building News. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

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Buyer Interest in a Net-Zero Home Sags in Survey of Architects

first_imgA quarterly survey by The American Institute of Architects shows rising interest in solar panels and docking stations for electric vehicles but declining interest over time in the number of people who say they want net-zero energy or superinsulated houses. The findings for the third quarter of the year represent information that AIA member architects who design single-family homes gather in their dealings with clients. The survey, which measured changes in interest from 2018 to 2019, focused on a variety of home features. Other quarterly reports look at kitchens and baths, home and property design, and neighborhood and community design. Many of the subject areas probably aren’t of particular interest to designers and builders who specialize in high-performance houses or sustainable design. But there are a few topics that relate directly to that type of construction.RELATED ARTICLESA New Guide for Net Zero BuildersMy Net Zero ConundrumA New Net-Zero CommunityThe Evolution of SuperinsulationMaking Room for a PV Array As AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker explained in a telephone call, the survey calculates the net difference between architects who report rising interest in a particular topic minus those who report declining interest. Here’s what participating architects reported in the last survey: Interest in net zero and superinsulated houses is going down: In the most recent survey, the net interest level was about 23%, the same as it was last year. But the four-year trend is off sharply. In 2016, a net of 43.9% reported increased interest in net-zero building. That dropped to 31.1% in 2017. By way of contrast, there was twice as much interest in two other features—accommodations for multiple generations and ramps/elevators. Interest in electric car docking stations is going up: Interest was up slightly this year, growing from 57% in 2018 to 61% this year. In 2016, it was 47.7%, which rose to 54.1% the following year. Solar panels are gaining ground: Up from 41% last year to 52% this year. What’s just as interesting is the proportion of architects who reported that interest was declining—13% in 2018, down to just 6% this year. Energy management: Down slightly, from 63% a year ago to 62% this year. Interest among prospective home buyers for technology friendly features—including extra outlet capacity and charging stations, wireless mobile charging docks, and USB wall outlets—dropped by five percentage points but remains strong at 64%. The AIA has been conducting the surveys since 2005, Baker said, with the purpose being to learn “what’s hot and what’s not.” In the area of solar panels and net-zero energy and superinsulated homes, Baker said trends could be partly explained by relatively low energy prices. “Solar panels make a lot of sense if energy prices are high,” he said, “not that much if energy prices are low.” Ditto with net-zero construction, and interest could surge rapidly with a spike in energy prices. Baker said the survey should not be viewed as a personal wish list from single-family architects. “It’s not designed to be, ‘What do you think is going to be popular in five years, or what should be popular five years from now,’ ” he said. “It’s very much, ‘What are you seeing in your current practice and projects you’re working on.’ ” What millennials don’t want Over at realtor.com, another survey charts home upgrades that millennials say they don’t care about. There’s no mention of energy efficiency, air tightness, or indoor air quality either way. But we do learn that there are five things that actively repel potential homebuyers. They include: “Over-the-top” landscaping: Out with tidy, well fertilized lawns. Instead, millennials are said to prefer growing plants indoors and having an outdoor space that doesn’t require too much maintenance. Formal dining rooms. Let’s cook up a storm and eat in or near the kitchen. Rigid floor plans: Millennials would rather have open floor plans and rooms that can be used for a variety of functions. Brand new carpeting: Bare floors with “statement rugs” are more appealing and better for their pets. Memorabilia and game rooms: These are areas where you put a pool table or show off stuff you’ve accumulated, like golfing trophies. Millennials are more taken with digital things, so a big screen TV or media room is more likely to please, according to the report. Realtor.com wasn’t specific on exactly when and how it gathered the information. -Scott Gibson is a contributing writer at Green Building Advisor and Fine Homebuilding magazine.last_img read more

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Alzheimers Association Congratulates Julianne Moore On Best Actress Academy Award

first_imgThe Alzheimer’s Association congratulates Julianne Moore on winning the Oscar for Best Actress at the 87th Annual Academy Awards.Playing the title character in the film “Still Alice,” Moore’s poignant portrayal of a woman diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease illustrates the impact of Alzheimer’s, the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, on individuals and their families.“On behalf of the more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and their 15 million caregivers, huge congratulations to Julianne Moore for winning an Academy Award,” said Angela Geiger, chief strategy officer, Alzheimer’s Association. “Her beautiful and thoughtful performance in ‘Still Alice’ resonated with filmgoers and helped to elevate awareness and foster much needed conversation about Alzheimer’s disease.”The Alzheimer’s Association has seen the power of Julianne’s performance in “Still Alice” through social media response. To enhance the conversation occurring around the movie and the disease, the Association asked constituents to celebrate friends and family members living with Alzheimer’s by sharing photos using #mybrain and #still[name]. Thousands responded, creating a meaningful online gallery.As The New York Times bestselling novel by Lisa Genova was adapted into film, the Alzheimer’s Association was proud to provide guidance to Julianne Moore, Kristen Stewart and the wonderfully talented and thoughtful screenwriting and directing team of Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland, who were meticulous in their pursuit of accuracy, speaking with Alzheimer’s Association scientists, care experts and volunteers, including people with the disease and their family members.“I was so impressed by Julianne Moore throughout the process of the film; she truly listened and wanted to know everything about how it feels to live with Alzheimer’s disease,” said Sandy Oltz, Alzheimer’s Association Early-Stage Advisor (diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 46). “I am so proud and impressed by how she brought the Alzheimer’s disease experience to life with ‘Alice.’ As someone who is on the same journey, all of the awards an accolades that have come to Julianne for her performance, including the Oscar, are so well deserved and so important to all of us with Alzheimer’s disease.”The facts about Alzheimer’s and women are illustrated in the film through the depiction of Alice and her daughter Lydia, who helps to care for her mom. Alzheimer’s disease affects women disproportionately: More than two-thirds of people living with Alzheimer’s are women, and 3 in 5 unpaid caregivers are women.An amazing group of women intent on raising awareness about Alzheimer’s and changing these dramatic numbers played an integral role in the creation of the film. In addition to the artistry of Julianne Moore and Kristen Stewart, the power of women helped propel this film forward, including award-winning journalist and “Still Alice” executive producer Maria Shriver, producers Elizabeth Gelfand Stearns and Pamela Koffler, bestselling author of “Still Alice” Lisa Genova, Alzheimer’s Association Early-Stage Advisor Sandy Oltz and Alzheimer’s Association Chief Science Officer, Maria Carrillo. These women were a force behind the production and development of “Still Alice,” and they are intent on galvanizing women behind the Alzheimer’s cause through the Alzheimer’s Association My Brain initiative, a movement harnessing the power of women to wipe out Alzheimer’s.“Julianne Moore and the women behind ‘Still Alice’ have helped ignite a national conversation with the film, and our hope is that their amazing work inspires others to join My Brain to truly change to course of Alzheimer’s disease for millions,” said Geiger.last_img read more

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Celebrities Attend Voices For The Voiceless Stars For Foster Kids Event

first_imgDarren Criss, Rosie Perez, Megan Hilty, Chita Rivera, Gloria Gaynor, Sherri Saum, and Stephanie Mills were just a few of the many supporters who attended and performed at last night’s 2nd Annual Voices for the Voiceless: Stars For Foster Kids event presented by Seth Rudetsky and James Wesley.Gloria Gaynor performs I Will SurviveCredit/Copyright: Getty ImagesThis special event brings together the brightest stars of stage and screen to raise awareness about the plight of kids in foster care, particularly those aged 13 to 21 whom many consider “unadoptable” because of their age.Darren Criss attends the 2nd Annual Voices for the VoicelessCredit/Copyright: Getty ImagesAdditional guests included Caroline Rhea, Alec Mapa, BD Wong, Orfeh, Adrienne Warren, Michelle Collins, Lilla Crawford, Carole Demas, and Dale Moss.Rosie Perez attends the 2nd Annual Voices for the Voiceless eventCredit/Copyright: Getty Imageslast_img read more

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