Home Prices Outpace Salaries

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Home Prices Outpace Salaries Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: Nicole Casperson in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, Journal, Market Studies, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Affordability HOUSING HSH mortgage 2017-11-21 Nicole Casperson The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Nicole Casperson is the Associate Editor of DS News and MReport. She graduated from Texas Tech University where she received her M.A. in Mass Communications and her B.A. in Journalism. Casperson previously worked as a graduate teaching instructor at Texas Tech’s College of Media and Communications. Her thesis will be published by the International Communication Association this fall. To contact Casperson, e-mail: [email protected] Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img November 21, 2017 1,534 Views Tagged with: Affordability HOUSING HSH mortgage Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home Prices Outpace Salaries Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: What’s in Store for Existing Home Sales . . . Next: Catching Up With HUD Salaries are having a hard time keeping pace with home prices, even as prices continue to decline in many metro areas across the country.Utilizing the the National Association of Realtors’ Q3 2017 data for median-home prices, national mortgage rate data derived from weekly surveys by Freddie Mac and the MBA for 30-year fixed rate mortgages and available property tax and homeowners insurance costs, HSH.com recently released a report on the affordability of the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs).According to the data, affordability remains a major issue even though the median price of homes sold in Q3 2017—compared to Q2 2017—was actually lower in 29 of the 50 markets reviewed.In fact, for salaries to keep up with rising prices, year-over-year income gains needed to be at a 10 percent increase in about one third of all metros—and more than 9 percent in another nine.Virgina Beach MSA experienced the lowest quarter-to-quarter costs at -6.63 percent, Following suit is Nashville at -5.71 percent, and San Francisco at -5.26 percent. According to the report, this reflects increased sales of lower cost homes in those markets during the period compared to Q2.Although most markets were reportedly less expensive on a quarter-to-quarter basis, the data reports that is not the case when reviewing median costs in the Q3 of this year versus the Q3 2016, where a year-over-year decline was seen in just 1 metro area—Hartford, Connecticut—with a decline of -1.04 percent.Meanwhile, 34 of the 50 markets experienced annual gains of over 5 percent. The most expensive market the data found was the San Jose MSA, at a 16.5 percent annual rise in the median price, followed by Seattle, at an increase of 13.36 percent, and Los Angeles, with an increased 10.06 percent.Overall wage gains continue to be suppressed, rising at an estimated 2.5 percent annual rate. The report notes that “the ability of a potential homebuyer to keep up is increasingly difficult, if not impossible.”In the end, the report says, “somewhat lower mortgage rates during the period helped to improve affordability, but we may not be able to count on this offset much as we move into the Q4 2017 and beyond.”To view the full report, click here. Share Save Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

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How can I gain experience I need?

first_img Comments are closed. How can I gain experience I need?On 3 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today I am working in a small recruitment agency which specialises in accountancy.I am the company administrator/researcher and have been here for more thanthree years. I have done my Certificate in Personnel Practice, and alsograduated with a 2:2 in psychology and health sciences. I have repeatedly applied for jobs in HR, and I am looking for anadministrative post so that I can progress and further my education within thesector. Why is it so tough? How am I supposed to gain HR experience when no-one willgive me the kickstart I need? Professor Towler says: You are clearly very well qualified and obviously keen to continue buildingyour portfolio of qualifications and experience, so I can fully understand yourfrustration at being unable to get the career move you want. I found myself in exactly the same position a number of years ago when Ileft the civil service to start my own consultancy. Like you, I had a basket full of qualifications but was struggling to breakinto the market. Then a former colleague gave me an extremely simple andvaluable piece of advice. It boiled down to ‘what do you specialise in, and howdoes your specialism add value?’ Once I found the answer I never looked back, and in many ways I think thisis the key to your problem, too. HR is made up of a number of sometimes very different areas and levels ofexpertise. These include a wide variety of disciplines, such as training,corporate services, operations, rewards, learning and development, recruitment,employment law, compensation and benefits – just to name a few. In other words,the HR market is comprised of a range of different niches which change anddevelop according to organisational and business needs. I suggest you study the market and identify potential niches you can competein. You have a recruitment background, and your CPP and degree give youadditional areas of expertise, too. You have research skills and you know theaccountancy business. You probably also know quite a lot about financial services more generally –and this is just for starters. So, rather than applying for administrative posts, try looking for morespecialised positions where your background gives you a stronger competitiveadvantage. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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We are always branding

first_imgThe term, brand, is likely from a Norse word for “burn”.  Like the cowboys who burn their brands on cattle, marketers try to burn an image (a distinguishing, attention getting, memorable, and complimentary image) in our minds.Every day, we brand ourselves.  Some of us are better at it than others.  Some of us are more aware than others that it is taking place.  For good or for bad, it is true.  It is not by accident that some institutions are better at developing and nurturing their brands. No doubt, you have heard about great branding and advertising campaigns such as those by Nike and Apple.  Not everyone does it that well.More directly to the point, some credit unions are excellent at branding, while others need help. Most likely, there are branding issues that – at times – keep you up at night. Every brand wants to connect to its customers in a perceptible, emotional way that will result in a lifelong bond. This does not happen overnight.  From brand inception, to building a brand, to improving a brand… you must actively make decisions that move the brand forward. continue reading » 17SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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The REITs of San Francisco

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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