$1 million prize for sustainable development non-profits

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Aluminium packaging company Alcan Inc has announced a new annual $1 million prize to recognise outstanding contributions from the not-for-profit sector to the goal of sustainable development.The prize will is open to not-for-profit, non-governmental or civil society organisations that contribute positively to economic, environmental and social sustainability for the benefit of future generations. The prize will be managed by the Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum. Advertisement Howard Lake | 30 January 2004 | News $1 million prize for sustainable development non-profits The closing date for applications is 31 March 2004. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Broward School District Clears Parkland Administrators Despite Investigation Noting Failures

first_imgAs questions continue in the aftermath of the Parkland school shooting, the Broward School District recently cleared administrators at the school, even after an outside investigator blamed them for several procedural failures contributing to the 2018 massacre.A committee of district administrators did not find just cause on May 7 to discipline Ty Thompson, who was principal of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School at the time of the shooting, or Assistant Principal Denise Reed. Both individuals were reassigned from the school last year.Jeff Morford, another assistant principal at the school who has retired, was also cleared of most of the allegations against him.However, he was given a letter of reprimand for mishandling a 2016 threat assessment of the student who would kill 17 people and injure another 17 on Feb. 14, 2018.Records obtained by the Sun Sentinel show that attorney Jennifer Ruiz, whose firm was contracted by the district to conduct a review, accused Thompson of failing to adequately supervise school employees.“The evidence shows that Mr. Thompson delegated away many of his own responsibilities or duties to his assistant principals, but failed to implement any type of system to oversee compliance,” she wrote.Ruiz adds that Reed and Morford botched the killer’s threat assessment, and that Morford also ignored various warning signs and provided testimony lacking credibility.A statement from Kathy Koch, the district’s chief communications officer, said Ruiz’s role was to research and present facts, which was was done “comprehensively and thoroughly.”Koch adds that the decision to determine whether there was cause for discipline was up to the committee.“The committee concluded there was not just cause,” the statement goes on to say.Lisa Maxwell, who represents the three administrators as executive director of the Broward Principals and Assistants Association, responds, “The investigator had no idea of how any of the processes actually work. All she did was try to be a rubber stamp for the statewide commission, and she failed miserably.”She described Ruiz as a “lawyer from Miami with no background in investigations, absolutely zero understanding of how schools operate.”Ruiz also completed investigations of Assistant Principal Winfred Porter and Security Specialist Kelvin Greenleaf.In the end, she found no cause to discipline Greenleaf. However, she determined that Porter, who oversaw the school’s security, failed to ensure staff knew how and when to activate emergency Code Red lockdown procedures.The Professional Standards Committee also overturned that recommendation and cleared Porter.The only employees who ended up facing any severe discipline were two security monitors whose contracts were not renewed in June 2018.The full investigation into Ty Thompson is available here. Notes from the Professional Standards Committee can be found here.The investigation of Denise Reed has three parts. Read Part 1, Part 2 or Part 2 supplement. Notes from the Professional Standards Committee can be found here.The investigation of Jeff Morford has three parts. Read Part 1, Part 2 or Part 2 supplement. Notes from the Professional Standards Committee can be found here.The full investigation of Winfred Porter is available here. Notes from the Professional Standards Committee can be found here.The full investigation of Kelvin Greenleaf is available here. Notes from the Professional Standards Committee can be found here.last_img read more

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Fireside Chat hosts a conversation with Cafe Dulce founder

first_img“We’re not here serving pastries and drinks and food — we serve people,” Choi said. “At the end of the day, the pastries that we make, the drinks that we slave over, the latte art that we pour that we’re proud of … that’s only as important as the person that we’re serving them to.” Choi said that he is primarily motivated by the belief that his hard work will pay off. Along with the support of his family, this belief aided him through the early days of running the cafe. Choi said that at the time, his mother was in remission from ovarian cancer, and neither his mother nor he had any prior experience in the baking industry. Although his mother had a business partner, Choi said the partner dropped out of the project three weeks before opening day, prompting himself to embark on the business venture with his mother. “I think the most important lessons I’ve learned from the speech is that it’s interesting to know that hospitality is the most important thing,” Msei said. “It’s not about the food, but about people and to have passion in the things you do.” “It’s not about the person … It’s not ‘you didn’t do this, or you did this’ … It’s more like the behavior you choose,” Choi said. When he was starting his first cafe in Little Tokyo, Choi said he found that engaging with the surrounding community is a key aspect of running a business. “So I put in my two weeks, left my job for the last time and I’ve been at Dulce since 2010 when I came on board,” Choi said. James Choi, a USC alumnus, opened the first Cafe Dulce in Little Tokyo in 2011. The cafe, which has a branch located in the USC Village, is a popular eatery for students. (Shaylee Navarro/Daily Trojan) Choi said the reason for Dulce’s popularity is its emphasis on hospitality, as the franchise aims to bring about positive change in the community. “The only thing you can do is just put your head down and work,” Choi said. “And I [couldn’t] afford to hire people, so I … physically [had to] do everything that I [could]. So literally from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., everyday for almost two years.” “Because we gave to the community, even though we didn’t have much to give, they were the ones that patronized us during those dark times, during 2011 and 2012 when it was really slow,” Choi said. Spark SC board member Ankur Rastogi, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering and computer science, asked Choi how he approaches his staff when they make mistakes. Choi said he tries to coach workers rather than punish them. Choi, who graduated from USC in 2005 with a degree in accounting, worked for the multinational professional services firm Ernst & Young. He then opened up Teuscher Swiss Chocolates in Palo Alto with his mother, eventually creating the first Dulce in Little Tokyo in 2011. Alicia Msei, a graduate student at the Marshall School of Business, said the event helped her realize the importance of incorporating hospitality in businesses. On any given day at USC Village, dozens of people stand patiently outside of Dulce waiting for their caffeine fix. Dulce’s popularity — both at USC and in Los Angeles — can be attributed to its emphasis on hospitality. In an event organized by student entrepreneurship organization Spark SC, Dulce founder and owner James Choi shared how he came to be the mastermind behind one of the most popular local cafes.last_img read more

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