FBI and Air Force jointly investigating deadly vehicle crash at Travis Air Force Base

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) — The FBI and the Air Force’s Office of Special Investigations are jointly looking into why a vehicle crashed shortly afterward gaining access to Travis Air Force Base in California Wednesday night, the Air Force confirmed.Investigators are trying to determine what the possible motive may have been for the incident that left the driver dead after the vehicle was engulfed in flames. A U.S. official said it appears that there were propane tanks inside the vehicle.The vehicle gained access to the main gate at Travis, crashing shortly afterward and catching fire, the base said in a statement. “The driver of the vehicle was pronounced dead at the scene,” the statement read. “There were no additional injuries.” The incident began when guards at the main checkpoint to enter Travis AFB saw a vehicle moving slowly towards the checkpoint, said a U.S. official.When they motioned for the vehicle to stop the car ignited and ended up rolling onto a median towards the opposite lane of traffic, the official said.It appeared there were propane tanks inside the vehicle, the U.S. official said. There were no shots fired during the incident, a defense official told ABC News. The official added that the driver of the vehicle was a civilian, not a service member.The U.S. official said investigators are looking at a broad range of potential motives, including whether the driver was mentally unstable, or whether it could be possible terrorism or a suicide.The official said investigators are in the initial stages of the investigation and there are more questions than answers about this incident.The Air Force said there are no current known threats to Travis or its community. The main gate has reopened, and all facilities are operating normally.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Influence of magnetospheric processes on winter HF radar spectra characteristics

first_imgThis study investigates further the relationship between regions of the magnetosphere and the characteristics of HF radar Doppler spectra recorded in the ionospheric projection of those regions. It builds on earlier work, which has reported a relationship between the Doppler spectral width and the ionospheric projection of the magnetospheric cusp region, by introducing novel techniques for classifying the Doppler spectra recorded by the SuperDARN radars. We first review the geophysical factors that can condition the characteristics of the autocorrelation function (ACF) data produced by the radars. This leads to a classification scheme of the ACF data which is then applied to a large database compiled from winter data taken by the Northern Hemisphere SuperDARN radars. This statistical study shows that the ACF characteristics are not randomly distributed in space, but rather are spatially organized in the ionosphere. This paper suggests that these regions are ordered primarily by the low energy (approximate to 1 keV) electron precipitation region and the presence of intense ULF wave activity.last_img read more

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Muting the Mozart effect

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqSY3INIxAs” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/oqSY3INIxAs/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Children get plenty of benefits from music lessons. Learning to play instruments can fuel their creativity, and practicing can teach much-needed focus and discipline. And the payoff, whether in learning a new song or just mastering a chord, often boosts self-esteem.But Harvard researchers now say that one oft-cited benefit — that studying music improves intelligence — is a myth.Though it has been embraced by everyone from advocates for arts education to parents hoping to encourage their kids to stick with piano lessons, a pair of studies conducted by Samuel Mehr, a Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) doctoral student working in the lab of Elizabeth Spelke, the Marshall L. Berkman Professor of Psychology, found that music training had no effect on the cognitive abilities of young children. The studies are described in a Dec. 11 paper published in the open-access journal PLoS One.“More than 80 percent of American adults think that music improves children’s grades or intelligence,” Mehr said. “Even in the scientific community, there’s a general belief that music is important for these extrinsic reasons. But there is very little evidence supporting the idea that music classes enhance children’s cognitive development.”The notion that music training can make someone smarter, Mehr said, can largely be traced to a single study published in Nature. In it, researchers identified what they called the “Mozart effect.” After listening to music, test subjects performed better on spatial tasks.Though the study was later debunked, the notion that simply listening to music could make someone smarter became firmly embedded in the public imagination, and spurred a host of follow-up studies, including several that focused on the cognitive benefits of music lessons.Though dozens of studies have explored whether and how music and cognitive skills might be connected, when Mehr and colleagues reviewed the literature they found only five studies that used randomized trials, the gold standard for determining causal effects of educational interventions on child development. Of the five, only one showed an unambiguously positive effect, and it was so small — just a 2.7 point increase in IQ after a year of music lessons — that it was barely enough to be statistically significant.“The experimental work on this question is very much in its infancy, but the few published studies on the topic show little evidence for ‘music makes you smarter,’” Mehr said.To explore the connection between music and cognition, Mehr and his colleagues recruited 29 parents and 4-year-old children from the Cambridge area. After initial vocabulary tests for the children and music aptitude tests for the parents, each was randomly assigned to one of two classes, one that had music training, or another that focused on visual arts.“We wanted to test the effects of the type of music education that actually happens in the real world, and we wanted to study the effect in young children, so we implemented a parent-child music enrichment program with preschoolers,” Mehr said. “The goal is to encourage musical play between parents and children in a classroom environment, which gives parents a strong repertoire of musical activities they can continue to use at home with their kids.”Harvard study on music and cognition Children and parents take part in a music training class as part of a Harvard study that explored whether studying music improved cognition among young children.Among the key changes Mehr and his colleagues made from earlier studies were controlling for the effect of different teachers — Mehr taught both the music and visual arts classes — and using assessment tools designed to test areas of cognition, vocabulary, mathematics, and two spatial tasks.“Instead of using something general, like an IQ test, we tested four specific domains of cognition,” Mehr said. “If there really is an effect of music training on children’s cognition, we should be able to better detect it here than in previous studies, because these tests are more sensitive than tests of general intelligence.”The study’s results, however, showed no evidence for cognitive benefits of music training.While the groups performed comparably on vocabulary and number-estimation tasks, the assessments showed that children who received music training performed slightly better at one spatial task, while those who received visual arts training performed better at the other.“Study One was very small. We only had 15 children in the music group, and 14 in the visual arts,” Mehr said. “The effects were tiny, and their statistical significance was marginal at best. So we attempted to replicate the study, something that hasn’t been done in any of the previous work.”To replicate the effect, Mehr and colleagues designed a second study that recruited 45 parents and children, half of whom received music training, and half of whom received no training.Just as in the first study, Mehr said, there was no evidence that music training offered any cognitive benefit. Even when the results of both studies were pooled to allow researchers to compare the effect of music training, visual arts training, and no training, there was no sign that any group outperformed the others.“There were slight differences in performance between the groups, but none were large enough to be statistically significant,” Mehr said. “Even when we used the finest-grained statistical analyses available to us, the effects just weren’t there.”While the results suggest studying music may not be a shortcut to educational success, Mehr said there is still substantial value in music education.“There’s a compelling case to be made for teaching music that has nothing to do with extrinsic benefits,” he said. “We don’t teach kids Shakespeare because we think it will help them do better on the SATs. We do it because we believe Shakespeare is important.“Music is an ancient, uniquely human activity. The oldest flutes that have been dug up are 40,000 years old, and human song long preceded that,” he said. “Every single culture in the world has music, including music for children. Music says something about what it means to be human, and it would be crazy not to teach this to our children.”The study was supported by funding from the Dana Foundation, and inspired by the work of William Safire.last_img read more

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Gold Coast apartment block will earn its new owners big bucks

first_img The three-storey building at 6 Tallebudgera Drive has six apartments. All the apartments have been renovated inside.“It’s all on one title, that’s what makes it really attractive to investors,” he said.“Because it’s all on one title, that’s the only way it can be sold.“Right now you could rent it out for $2500 a week for the whole thing.“It’s perfect for an investment.”Mr Stafford said the owners bought the 549sq m corner property in 2016 then spent about six months renovating the building. “They bought it in a pretty miserable state (so) they vacated the property and renovated it,” he said.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day ago The building is about 200m from the beach and 500m from Tallebudgera Creek. It is about 200m to the beach and 500m to Tallebudgera Creek with public transport, cafes and restaurants close by.Mr Stafford said there was lots of demand for apartment blocks in the area as opportunities to buy them didn’t come up often.“It’s very rare at the moment,” he said.The unit block will go under the hammer at Ray White Broadbeach’s in-room auction event to be held at the Sofitel Gold Coast Broadbeach on January 23. MORE NEWS: Vacant block hits market for the first time in 40 years Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:40Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:40 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenOpen for inspection etiquette for buyers00:41 A Palm Beach apartment block is offering investors a sweet deal.A PALM Beach apartment block metres from the surf is offering its new owners the chance to rake in $2500 a week in rent.The three-storey building at 6 Tallebudgera Drive with six two-bedroom apartments and a manager’s office will go to auction later this month.Ray White Broadbeach agent Mark Stafford said its location and income opportunity made it so appealing, particularly among investors and developers. MORE NEWS: Win a $2.3 million prize homelast_img read more

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