Two further arrests in Tyrone over new IRA activities

first_img Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp Two further arrests in Tyrone over new IRA activities Two men are being questioned in the North in relation to activities of the New IRA.They were taken into custody following four searches in county Tyrone by the North’s Terrorism Investigation Unit as part of ongoing investigations into criminality.Cash was taken in one of the searches which was found in a recycling bin and a safe.The men aged 41 and 42 are being detained at a serious crime unit in Belfast. Google+ Homepage BannerNews DL Debate – 24/05/21 Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic center_img WhatsApp Facebook By News Highland – August 6, 2020 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Previous articleBus Éireann comes under fire over Letterkenny routeNext articlePolice attacked with petrol bombs in Derry News Highland Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Surrounded by nature & reflected in it

first_img 17The “Fishbowl” at Currier offers a place to watch television, and, for Mara and friend, it is a place to perch. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 12One of the youngest residents of Currier is Mara Cavallaro. Her parents, Nadejda Marques (right) and Jim Cavallaro, are Currier’s House Masters. Her friend Autumn Galindo (left) holds the other end of the jump rope. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 2In 1972, full coeducational dormitories were instituted at Harvard — pictured here are the men and women of Currier House in a yearbook from the 1970s. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 6Because of the difficulty of pronouncing his first name, security guard Yohannes Tewolde is often called “Your Highness.” Here he shares a laugh with students Peter Davis ’12 (center) and Alexander Ramek ’12. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerStaff Photo Rose Lincoln/Harvard University News Office 4Yohannes Tewolde, the current and beloved night security guard at Currier, walks past the house entrance. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Audrey Bruce Currier House opened in 1970, named after a Radcliffe alumna who had died in a plane crash. The architects, Harrison and Abramovitz, surveyed students about their desires for housing, and so pioneered small clusters of dorm units, each with upstairs bedrooms and a downstairs living room. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Residents post ideas for a greener Currier on a board in the dining hall. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 25Currier House revelers are easily identified at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 26Currier’s finest and wettest, Alyssa Devlin ’11 (left) and Allan Bradley ’11, approach a dorm in the Yard to welcome new House members at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 7Says Yohannes Tewolde, “I hope I’m making a difference in their lives, encouraging them if they’re down. I tell them they’re doing a good job, and I pray for them. Sometimes I tell them to take a nap and get some rest. They tell me I’m like a mom or a dad.” He is pictured here with Suzanna Bobadilla ’13 (right), who waits for the bus. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 29Currier resident Tiffany Fereydouni is congratulated with a hug. Katherine C. Cohen/Harvard Staff Photographer 19Two days a week Mara gets a bike ride to ballet by Currier resident Lindsey Brinton ’12. Mara usually reads a book to and from the studio. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Devon Newhouse ’13, the “Eco Rep” for Currier House, proves that trash can indeed be treasure: She hosts a swap for clothing — and whatever else — in the House’s laundry room. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 21Living in the only undergraduate House at Harvard named solely for a woman are block mates Rachel Bervell (from left), Nadia Farjood, Jeanette Schnierle, Jordan Ashwood, Sarah Mumanachit, Karina Herrera, and Melissa Naidoo. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 22Students wait in the foyer for the shuttle as snow falls at Currier House. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 28Diplomas are awarded at Currier House. Katherine C. Cohen/Harvard Staff Photographercenter_img 14Autumn Galindo (left) waits for her ride after visiting her friend, Currier resident Mara Cavallaro, who is holding the door for a student. Mara’s mother, House Master Nadejda Marques (center), looks on. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 15Mara (left) and friend Autumn play air hockey while Currier students play ping-pong in the lower level lounge. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 23A Currier resident displays more than the conventional poster at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 11As part of an effort to make the House “greener,” Building Manager Manny Casillas replaced all incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent in all custodial, mechanical, and storage closets. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 20Lindsey Brinton ’12 teaches Mara to play the piano during their babysitting sessions at Currier House, where both reside. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Yohannes Tewolde goofs around with Currier resident Richard Maopolski (right). Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Some days, Mara’s bedroom is her gymnasium. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 5Patricia Machado (right) works in Dining Services at Currier House and is welcomed to work by Yohannes Tewolde. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer From the oversize windows in the room called “the Fishbowl” at Currier House, you can see lush green grass and blossoming trees on alternate sloping hillsides. Students who live in Currier, on Radcliffe Quad, have a longer walk to classes than their River House classmates but live more quietly, surrounded by nature. Since 1970, when Currier opened, the great outdoors have been invited inside. More recently, following the lead of the original architects, current Currier residents have “greened” the way they live, introducing environmental initiatives. Low-flow toilets and dishware drives are part of life in this House they call home. Living in a place nicknamed the “Tree House” comes with responsibility, which Currier’s staff and residents have embraced. 24When the various Houses extend invitations for living assignments to freshmen, Mark Piana ’11 (center, bare chest), and Kevin Chen ’12 (right) whoop it up for Currier House. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 3This black and white photograph of the Master’s living room at Currier House was published in a booklet distributed at the House dedication in 1971. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 27Currier resident Danielle Gram co-founded the nonprofit Kids for Peace, an organization that “works with children ages 3 to 10 to empower them to lead the way to a more tolerant, nonviolent society.” She was featured in Harvard’s special Commencement issue. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 16Mara plays the piano in the dance studio at Currier. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Young Currier resident Mara Cavallaro, on the school bus, is unhappy because her father, House Master Jim Cavallaro, is leaving on a work-related trip. He signs “I love you” to her. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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Professor analyzes history of Christmas star

first_imgAlthough most people associate Christmas with a manger, shepherds and over-booked inns, astrophysicist Grant J. Matthews from Notre Dame’s department of physics enjoys examining the Nativity story from a cosmic perspective. Matthews gave a lecture titled “What and When Was the Christmas Star?” this past weekend.  “There’s actually a wealth of astronomy about the circumstances of how we celebrate Christmas,” Matthews said. The lecture utilized Jordan Hall’s state of the art Digital Visualization Theater to explore potential explanations of the Christmas star, which is described in the Gospel of Matthew. “Within our 10 computers here, we have programmed in memory every star, every object in the sky known to humankind. We can calculate their trajectory and where they’ve been, so we can go forward and back in time,” Matthews said. “Using this, we can go back to the time when that Christmas star first appeared and see how the sky might have appeared to the Magi and might have signaled that there was a newborn ruler in Judea.” Matthews said the Magi were early astrologers who searched for meaning in the carefully followed movements of celestial objects. “[The Magi] believed that each sign of the zodiac referred to a different time of the year and a different geographic location of the world,” he said. The night sky the Magi studied 2,000 years ago is distinctly different from the one we know today, Matthews said. “The location of the vernal equinox changes with time,” he said. “The vernal equinox was just departing the constellation of Aries, which actually fixed a lot of the lore of the time.” Aries, the first sign of the zodiac, is symbolized by a lamb and was considered by the Magi to signify Judea. “Something that would have been seen as important at the time would be represented by something occurring in the constellation Aries,” he said. Though scientists are unsure about what exactly this phenomenon was, Matthews said the four most likely theories suggest it was a comet, nova, supernova, or conjunction of planets. Using records of the Chinese Court, researchers discovered a few comets and supernovae that occurred near the time of Jesus’s birth, Mathews said.  However, Matthews does not think that the Magi would interpret these occurrences as joyous indications of a great leader being born.   “[Comets, novae, and supernovae] were seen as harbingers of a great disaster.  For example, each comet is associated with some catastrophic event: the death of Cleopatra, the death of Caesar, these were not harbingers of joy, they were warnings of disaster” Matthews said. Rather, Matthews said he believes the most likely explanation for what the Magi saw in the sky lies within our own solar system. “[The Magi] would be very concerned with the location of the planets. What they would look for would be where planets line up. Around 6 BC, the sun, Jupiter, and the moon are all in Aries and Venus and Saturn are right next door,” he said. This grouping of planets would have been interpreted eagerly by the Magi. Matthews said different objects in the solar system were thought to represent different symbolic meanings. “Jupiter is the symbol of a powerful leader. The moon means that the leader had a special appointed destiny in their death. Saturn indicated a giving of life. A powerful leader, a newborn king, born in the land of Judea in our time frame of interest.” Matthews said he believes this grouping closely matches the one reported in the original nativity story, sayingd the “Christmas star” most likely refers to this unusual grouping of celestial bodies.   Contact Grace McCormack at [email protected]last_img read more

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GAO urges HHS to speed antiviral, prepandemic vaccine plans

first_img Sep 30 GAO report In June HHS released draft guidance on the use of antivirals during an influenza pandemic. The agency’s goal is to place 75 million treatment courses in the Strategic National Stockpile, and draft guidance proposes that the private sector stockpile 110 million additional treatment courses. Investigators also said a public comment period after the draft prepandemic vaccine allocation plan is announced is a useful step. “Public participation is an essential component for acceptance of tough decisions that will be required unless and until greater capacity or a universal vaccine can be developed,” the report said. The 72-page report, focusing on the US Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) pandemic response plans, was published on the GAO’s Web site on Sep 30. See also: Oct 6, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – In a recent progress report to Congress on federal influenza pandemic response planning, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) recognized a host of obstacles but cited two areas that officials could make headway on: finalizing guidance on allocating antivirals and developing guidance on how to prioritize groups to receive prepandemic vaccine in the early stages of a pandemic. The proposed guidance, developed by an interagency task force, advised that antivirals in government stockpiles be used to treat people who are ill, especially when supplies are scarce, and that antivirals for preventive use be mainly drawn from private stockpiles. The draft document did not attempt to prioritize groups. “We believe that finalizing guidance on the use of pharmaceutical interventions will be crucial for responding to a pandemic outbreak and that the necessary guidance documents should be finalized as soon as possible,” the GAO wrote. Bill Hall, an HHS spokesman in Washington, DC, told CIDRAP News that the agency has been working on the draft allocation plan, but that it isn’t finished and the agency can’t yet say when it will be. In a letter responding to the GAO report, Vincent Ventimiglia, Jr, assistant secretary for legislation at HHS, wrote that the agency is in the process of updating the proposed guidance on antiviral use during a pandemic, on the basis of feedback it received during the public comment period. The comment period was set to end on Jul 3, according to a May 23 Federal Register notice. Investigators looked at three response components that the GAO and outside experts have said need improvements—pharmaceutical intervention, healthcare surge capacity, and public communications. Though the GAO gave detailed status reports for all three of the areas, it made recommendations only about pharmaceutical interventions. The GAO said establishing target groups in advance is a key component of pandemic planning and warned that HHS could encounter problems if it doesn’t issue graft guidance for prepandemic vaccines in a more timely manner. “This lack of essential information could slow the initial response at the state and local levels and complicate the general public’s understanding of the necessity for rationing these interventions,” the GAO wrote. Jun 3 CIDRAP News story “HHS offers pandemic guidance on masks, antivirals” In his response accompanying the GAO report, Ventimiglia wrote that HHS will release its proposed prepandemic vaccine allocation guidance “in the near future.” As for prepandemic vaccine stockpiles, the GAO report says HHS will oversee the distribution and administration to workers who are needed to keep society functioning until a pandemic vaccine becomes widely available. According to the report, the National Infrastructure Advisory Council has estimated that the critical workforce numbers about 20 million people, and HHS’ goal is to stockpile enough to cover that number. However, HHS has not yet released draft guidance on prioritizing target groups for prepandemic vaccines. HHS officials told GAO investigators that target groups for the prepandemic vaccine would likely resemble those for the pandemic vaccine, but would have more of a critical workforce focus. They also said that a tiered approach like that used for the pandemic vaccine would be needed only if a pandemic occurs before HHS reaches its goal of stockpiling enough for 20 million people. In its other recommendation, the GAO advised HHS to release guidance for using and prioritizing prepandemic vaccine designed to protect against a pandemic virus before a vaccine closely matched to the actual pandemic strain is available. Federal officials are already stockpiling a prepandemic vaccine based on the H5N1 virus. In June HHS released its official guidance on allocating pandemic vaccine, which would be developed after the start of a pandemic and designed to match the circulating strain. HHS officials project that it would take 20 to 23 weeks after the start of a pandemic to start producing the first doses. May 23 Federal Register noticelast_img read more

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India will find Australia a different proposition next year – skipper Paine

first_imgBy Nick MulvenneySYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia have developed a ruthless streak in their home series sweeps against Pakistan and New Zealand and will present much stiffer opposition when India tour next year, captain Tim Paine said on Monday.Paine’s side wrapped up a 3-0 series triumph over the Black Caps by romping to 279-run victory at the Sydney Cricket Ground to make it five comprehensive wins out of five matches for the home summer.“I came into this summer expecting to win all five tests,” Paine told reporters.“I think now we’ve got a team together that is really consistent, we’ve got a number of match-winners with both bat and ball and our lesser players have improved a hell of a lot over the last 12 months. “We’ve probably become more ruthless which was something we wanted to be … We’ve got great quality throughout our side and it’s a very exciting team to be part of.”Next up for Australia in Test cricket is a tour of Bangladesh in June and July followed by what Paine described as a “mouthwatering” series at home to Virat Kohli’s India. India last visited in the 2018-19 season and, with Steve Smith and David Warner suspended after the ball-tampering scandal, earned their first series triumph on Australia soil.“We’re certainly a different side than what they played against last year,” Paine added. “There’s (also) Test championship points at stake and I think both India and Australia are eyeing off that final so every point is going to be critical.“If we can continue our upward trend, you’re potentially talking about the top two teams in the world so it’s going to be an awesome series.”The victory over New Zealand brought Australia (296) closer to India (360) at the top of the World Test Championship table with the two nations occupying the positions which will earn places in the final at Lord’s in 2021. Paine said the way Australia approached the key moments in matches had changed since India last toured, resulting in the clinical displays against Pakistan and New Zealand.“Every team wants to be ruthless,” he said.“(But) I think there were probably periods in the Test series against India we should have capitalised on, but through wanting it too much, or trying too hard, or putting too much pressure on ourselves, we let it slip,” Paine added. “When those big moments come now, we just focus on executing our roles. (BBC Sport)last_img read more

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