Harpers speech left much to be desired First Nations delegates say

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–Many First Nations chiefs and delegates at the Crown-First Nations Gathering in Ottawa expressed disappointment with Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s speech, even as some tried to find some hope buried in the words he delivered.Many chiefs and delegates were looking for signals in the prime minister’s speech for a new approach by his government toward First Nations issues.Harper also met with a small delegation of chiefs Monday evening who relayed some of the pressing issues facing their communities and the First Nations leaders were hoping the prime minister would respond in his speech.The prime minister also stayed longer than initially believed at the meeting and was said to be meeting with delegates late into the afternoon.For many, however, the speech felt short of expectations.Michael Bignell, a band councillor from the Opaskwayak First Nation in northern Manitoba, said he was disappointed the prime minister made no major announcement.“I was hoping for something of an announcement, of anything, like education,” said Bignell, who watched the speech on a video screen in the overflow room at the Chateau Laurier.Madawaska Maliseet Chief Joanna Bernard, from New Brunswick, said the speech fell flat.“I was not impressed. He didn’t bring anything, hope or inspiration from the future,” said Bernard, who also watched the events from the luxury hotel next to Parliament Hill.Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, however, said he saw gleams of possibility in Harper’s words.Nepinak said Harper’s comments on slowly eroding the Indian Act, instead of abolishing it, fit with his organizations call for creating a process, like a larger meeting involving premiers, to begin slowly changing the whole system.“We are not asking for a rewrite (of the Indian Act), we are asking for something new,” said Nepinak, who was in Victoria Hall to hear the prime minister’s chief first-hand. “First Nations are fully willing to participate and take on all responsibilities to that end. ”Ontario’s Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Stan Beardy, however, said he came away disappointed after hearing Harper’s speech.“We had hoped there would be an acknowledgment that these are our lands and that we have a right to benefit in jobs and training and economic benefits and job creation,” said Beardy. “Also, there is no real mention of how you are going to deal with the immediate challenges like housing.”Canupawakpa Dakota First Nation Chief Frank Brown said he didn’t really expect much from the speech and the prime minister met his expectations.“There was nothing different, nothing,” said Brown, whose Dakota community is in Manitoba. “He’s tried to announce to the world that, ‘I’m dealing with First Nations.’”Brown said his community will continue to try to generate their own revenues, outside of government funds.Brown’s community has already set up a smoke shack, which has been raided a couple of times already by Manitoba Ministry of Finance authorities. Brown said there are also plans to expand a fledgling casino to include VLTs.“We are asserting and declaring our rights,” said Brown, who was in the main hall for the meetings. “We want to generate revenue and create revenue to sustain us without federal funds and that is exactly what we are doing.”last_img read more

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Egyptian mummies found to have oldest figurative tattoos

first_imgCredit: British Museum A team of researchers from across Europe has found tattoos on two mummies at the British Museum, making them the oldest known examples of figurative tattoos. In their paper published in Journal of Archaeological Science, the group describes their study of dark splotches on preserved mummy skin. New tattoos discovered on Oetzi mummy More information: Renée Friedman et al. Natural mummies from Predynastic Egypt reveal the world’s earliest figural tattoos, Journal of Archaeological Science (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2018.02.002 Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Two mummies, one male, the other female, housed in the British Museum, were discovered over a century ago in Gebelein, a city that once existed in ancient Egypt—they have become part of a popular collection that is open to the public. In this new effort, the researchers were interested in dark splotches on the preserved skin. When they shined infrared light on the blotches, they observed distinct images.The team reports that the light revealed the outline of a Barbary sheep and a wild bull with horns on the upper arm of the male, and S-shaped designs and, on the shoulder of the female, a motif resembling the batons used in rituals. A closer look showed that the outlines were under the skin, and were likely made using soot from a fire, probably with a needle made from copper or bone.The record for the oldest tattoo is held by Ötzi the Iceman, but his tattoos were all geometric shapes. The images on the two mummies in the museum depict actual objects or beings, making them figurative, and are the oldest known example of such tattoos at 5000 years, breaking the old record by a thousand years.In addition to setting a record for tattoos, the finding also shows that archaeologists have been wrong in assuming that only women at the time were tattooed. The different types of tattoos also provide hints as to their purpose. Strong animals with horns likely communicated strength and bravery. The batons on the female, on the other hand, were generally used by women during rituals, and tattooing them on the skin likely represented an extension of that function. The researchers suggest that tattooing in the ancient culture was likely also a means for advertising status or other attributes. © 2018 Phys.org Journal information: Journal of Archaeological Science Citation: Egyptian mummies found to have oldest figurative tattoos (2018, March 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-egyptian-mummies-oldest-figurative-tattoos.htmllast_img read more

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