RCMP say suspect in Ahtahkakoop fatal shooting has died

first_imgAPTN National NewsRCMP say the suspect in a fatal shooting Tuesday morning in the Ahtahkakoop Cree Nation has also died.The 59-year-old man was found at approximately 5 p.m. in the community by RCMP. Police said a firearm went off after officers found the suspect and he was later pronounced dead in hospital. The RCMP said their officers never fired a shot.The small community, about 150 km north of Saskatoon, was rocked by a shooting hours earlier when a 56-year-old man was shot to death. Police have not identified either of the men.But according to resident Kim Sasakamoose, the shooting happened around 10 a.m. and the alleged shooter is her cousin, Elgin “Chucky” Sasakamoose.Chucky Sasakamoose. (Facebook photo)“They tried to bring him back to life,” said Kim Sasakamoose of the victim, who she identified as “Wayne” and being new to the community. The shooting happened near the health centre.A family friend identified the victim as Wayne Teed.Wayne Teed. (Facebook photo)Kim Sasakamoose said she heard the shooting was over a woman. “He took off on his quad,” said Kim Sasakamoose of her cousin. Police had told residents to stay in their homes throughout the day as they searched the area.Officers from several RCMP detachments were on the scene, including the canine and major crimes units. Police said they don’t believe there are any other victims or suspects. They have called in Saskatoon police to conduct what the RCMP said will be an independent investigation into what happened when the suspect died.RCMP at the scene of the shooting Tuesday in Ahtahkakoop. (Facebook photo)Chucky Sasakamoose was the son of Fred Sasakamoose, the first Aboriginal hockey player in National Hockey League when he played for the Chicago Blackhawks in 1953, according a family member.last_img read more

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Abilene to Apply for Grant to Upgrade Visitors Control Center at Dyess

first_imgThe Abilene Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Committee plans to apply for a $1.75 million grant from the Texas Military Preparedness Commission to upgrade the visitor control center at Dyess Air Force Base.On Tuesday the economic development agency for Abilene agreed to contribute $200,000 toward the application’s requirement for a local match. Those funds would be combined with $150,000 of in-kind contributions from the federal government to meet the 20 percent match, reported the Abilene Reporter-News.The city will apply for a second round of grants, totaling almost $16 million, the state will award on March 31. Last month, the Texas Military Preparedness Commission awarded $14.1 million to four communities for projects intended to support local installations. The Legislature allocated $30 million for the grant program for the fiscal 2016-2017 biennium.The project at Dyess is intended to improve security at the installation’s front gate by expanding the control center.“There are deficiencies at this control center,” said Bryan Yates, chamber vice president for military affairs. The new center already has been designed and could go ahead if Abilene secures funding, he said.The project should bolster the standing of Dyess in a future BRAC round, according to Yates.“It is the single largest employer in the area. If that base were to draw down or close altogether, it would be a significant negative impact to the Abilene economy,” he said. “Even though we have made great strides in the last 20 years in diversifying our economy, this is still an important component, and we want to make sure that stays there for the foreseeable future.” Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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6 TimeTested Tips for Designing a Killer App for Your Brand

first_img Register Now » Take a walk through your city, and you’ll probably find a Starbucks on almost every corner. Take a look through the phone of the closest passersby and you’ll likely find the Starbucks app. OK, not every smartphone. But consider that the brand’s app has been downloaded 10 million times and that that number will likely grow.Related: The Beginner’s Guide to Building and Launching an AppSome of the reasons: The caffeine behemoth enables customers to use its app to search for nearby locations, pay for their morning-coffee fix and send friends caffeinated gifts.Starbucks knows great apps aren’t just for selling, though. They’re also tools for delivering ongoing value and for making a brand essential to users. In fact, apps communicate important information about brands. So, rather than using your own business’ app as an avenue for a hard sell, think of it as an opportunity to educate consumers. The more they know about your company — from your values to your client services — the more confident they’ll be working with you.Herer are some ways you can build an app that supports your brand without overselling it:1. Represent your values.How you brand your app directly reflects your company’s character. Authenticity inspires confidence among customers and prospects, so weave your unique voice throughout the app’s messaging.2. Identify your expectations. Decide what you want to achieve with the app. If you’re trying to educate customers and earn their trust through high-value content, design your app around a great reading and navigation experience. If you’re focused solely on driving sales, you’ll need to build in a number of opportunities for customers to buy your services.Related: Why You Need High Quality Apps to Stay Relevant3. Check out the competition. Complete a thorough analysis of your competitors’ apps before you design your own. Your app should have a unique design, interface and brand voice to distinguish your culture and services from everyone else in your space.4. Consider the consumer. Make it easy for users to access information that interests them. Remember: The app presents an opportunity to educate customers and showcase your brand’s authenticity and values. You’re already on your users’ radar, so use engaging, valuable app content to stay there.Think about when and why people use your app. Build it around their motivations, and design it by seeing the app through their eyes. What’s the easiest, most intuitive way to move from point to point? What’s the logical flow of information? Create an experience so seamless that users will return to the app for the content and the ease of use.5. Don’t sacrifice the user experience for the brand. Provide as much information as possible without interfering with the user experience. If customers use your app to learn about your services, they don’t need distracting logos and gimmicky features to remind them who you are. A restrained, intuitive UX will lead them through the sales process. This doesn’t mean you should abandon branding altogether; there’s value in placing small logos throughout the app. The key is to drive home your message without being obnoxious. Consider placing your logo on a navigation bar that slides down when users touch the screen. The logo will appear only when customers are navigating the app, and it won’t interrupt the reading experience.Sketch out wireframes and compile content flowcharts before hiring developers. Entrepreneurs often struggle to communicate their visions to their development teams, and as a result, their products miss the mark. A clearly articulated plan helps you get the app you want.6. Tell your story. People want an emotional connection with the brands they use. Storytelling helps you create those connections, as it gives users a reason to return to your brand time and again.In a study of user loyalty at two Danish banks, researchers found that customers engaged more often and for a longer time period at the bank where they felt the most emotional attachment. Given the choice between your company and an equally qualified competitor, a compelling story could be the deciding factor for customers who are on the fence.Apps play an important role in a brand strategy. The key to app success is to enhance your brand image by providing value to customers and creating positive associations with your company. Use your app to build relationships, and it will become a powerful sales component. Related: 3 Ways to Make More Money With Your Mobile App Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals July 16, 2015 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. 4 min readlast_img read more

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The Sharing Economy Is More than a Buzzword Its Changing How We

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 3 min read Uber seems to be in every other headline of tech and business news, but just how pervasive is the sharing economy outside of tech blogs and the minds of business journalists?Very. Companies such as Uber and Airbnb are fundamentally changing the way we live and work in the U.S., according to a new report out this week.Forty-five million adults in the U.S., or more than one in five people, have worked in the sharing economy, according to the report developed jointly by Burson-Marsteller, a global strategic communications and public relations firm; The Aspen Institute’s Future of Work Initiative; and TIME. The survey, consisting of 3,000 online interviews of American adults, was conducted by research firm Penn Schoen Berland between Nov. 16 and 25.Twice the number of Americans that have worked in the sharing economy have used services provided by sharing-economy companies. More than 86 million adults in the U.S., or more than two in five people, have used sharing-economy services, according to the report.The sharing economy, also sometimes called the “on-demand” economy, includes those companies that use technology to identify excess or otherwise underutilized goods or services and matches them with people who are looking for those services. Uber and Airbnb are virtually household names in much of the country, but there are countless other smaller sharing-economy businesses. For example, Postmates is an on-demand delivery service, Taskrabbit is an online marketplace for micro jobs, and car2go is a car-sharing company.Related: What You Need to Know to Compete With the Surging Sharing Economy“With nearly a quarter of Americans already working in the On-Demand Economy, and more than a third buying its services, it is clear the sector is playing a major role in the growth and direction of the United States,” said Donald A. Baer, the CEO of Burson-Marsteller, in a statement accompanying the release of the report.   Even as the sharing economy is booming, the industry as a whole has some pretty big issues to work out. For example, 72 percent of survey respondents who work in the sharing economy think they should receive more benefits from their employers.Employee benefits have been a major issue for Uber of late. A lawsuit against Uber claims that drivers for the tech giant are not contract workers, but employees. Contractors are not due benefits, but employees are. If Uber were to have to start providing benefits to all of the drivers on its platform, that would be a game-changing expense that could potentially curtail the explosive growth of the company.  Related: General Motors Partners With Lyft to Develop Network of Self-Driving Cars January 7, 2016center_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

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