Assemblymember Chris Holden Introduces Legislation Which Would Prohibit Building the 710 Freeway Extension Tunnel Under Pasadena

first_imgGovernment Assemblymember Chris Holden Introduces Legislation Which Would Prohibit Building the 710 Freeway Extension Tunnel Under Pasadena His bill, AB 287, would prohibit state from building 710 tunnel extension By EDDIE RIVERA, Community Editor Published on Thursday, February 9, 2017 | 11:05 am Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy State Assemblymember Chris Holden announces his proposed legislation that would prohibit building a tunnel to complete the 710 freeway gap at a press conference near the South Pasadena Metro Gold Line Station on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017.In a dramatic development in the 50 year-old battle over the extension of the 710 Freeway and the construction of a tunnel to fill the corridor gap between the I-10 and I-210 Freeways, State Assemblymember Chris Holden has introduced a bill which, if passed, will completely remove the possibility of a tunnel to extend the freeway.“In light of California’s landmark climate legislation that mandates the rapid reduction of our greenhouse gas emissions, it is clear that the State Route 710 tunnel project is a misguided and obsolete solution,” said Holden at a press conference this morning at the South Pasadena Metro Station.Joining Holden in announcing the bill—AB 287—were Pasadena Mayor Terry Tornek, and Councilmembers Andy Wilson and Steve Madison, former Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard, along with leaders from a number of San Gabriel valley cities, including South Pasadena and Sierra Madre.The bill would establish the I-710 Gap Corridor Transit Study Zone Advisory Committee, with representatives from Pasadena, South Pasadena, Alhambra, Los Angeles, Caltrans and Metro. The committee would also include legislators representing the 710 Corridor Gap Communities.Said Holden, “This committee will be tasked with recommending the most appropriate and feasible solution for the 710 Corridor gap that effects the San Gabriel Valley. The committee will review a wide range of traffic calming, green space and mass transit options for the 6.2 mile gap and recommend a viable community supported solution that creates jobs for the San Gabriel Valley.”The bill specifically prohibits the State Department of Transportation from building the 710 Tunnel.Speaking to the cost of the proposed tunnel, Holden said, “Constructing a tunnel could cost up to a billion dollars per mile. Compare that to the recent extensions of the Gold Line which cost less than a billion dollars for 20 miles.”“It’s really important that (Assemblymember Holden) has added his powerful voice to the rising chorus of voices that continue to object to trying to impose this early 20th-Century solution to this 21st Century problem,” said Mayor Tornek. “The important thing is that it’s not enough to just say ‘no’ to something, you have to say, ‘What do we do?,’ and his bill contemplates taking a look at the alternatives, and simply objecting to something we are not even considering anymore.”“It’s nice that people like Chris are finally waking up to this problem,” said Jim Miller of the No 710 Action Committee. Asked what the bill would mean to the work that his committee has done, Miller said, “After fifty years, it may be over.”Thinking beyond the 710 issue, and discussing the larger transportation issues in the San Gabriel Valley, Holden also suggested extending the Metro light rail system to create a loop that connects cities beyond the San Gabriel Valley, into communities like Downey and Whittier.Added Holden, who cautiously anticipated swift movement of his bill, “Before any final recommendations are made, we have the opportunity to set a precedent for what transportation can be in California. Our state led the way by building one of the most advanced freeway systems in America, and we should lead the way now by taking a 21st Century approach to addressing our transportation needs.” 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Top of the News Make a comment Your email address will not be published. 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Southern favorite

first_imgPlant heavy, thin laterRutabagas can be planted in rows 14 to 18 inches apart. Soil should be worked well to form a good seedbed and fertilizer incorporated thoroughly. Seed should be planted half an inch deep with about 4 inches between plants. “Your initial seeding can be closer and then the plants can be thinned to a stand of 4 inches between plants,” Kelley said.Rutabagas require an abundant supply of moisture to insure best yields and highest quality. Most soils will require 1.5 inches of water every 7 to 10 days.Rutabagas are harvested when roots are 4 or 5 inches in diameter. The roots should be topped, washed free of soil and dried quickly. To top, remove the leaves from the fleshy root. As far as good eats go, the rutabaga ranks up there with the collard green and black-eyed pea to most Southerners. If you like the tuberous treat, now is the time to plant it, says a University of Georgia horticulturist.“Similar to turnips, rutabagas are often called table turnips in Northern areas and Canada,” said Terry Kelley, a horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “The roots are often longer than turnips and have a thick, leafy neck.”It can be grown in both spring and fall. But it has its best root growth during cool weather, around the 60 F to 65 F range, he said, but can take temperatures as low as 40 F. Two varieties best for GeorgiaThe most popular varieties grown in Georgia are the American Purple Top and the Laurentian. American Purple Top has a deep purple crown, a globe-shaped root, yellow flesh and is yellow below the crown. The leaves of this variety are blue-green. The root grows 5 to 6 inches in diameter and takes 90 days to mature.Laurentian has a purple crown, a globe-shaped root, yellow flesh and is light yellow below the crown. The leaves of this variety are medium blue-green. The root can grow to 5 and a half inches in diameter and takes 90 days to mature.Plant deep and before frostRutabagas should be seeded 10 to 12 weeks before a heavy frost, he said. North Georgians should set plants by Sept. 15, he said. South Georgians have until Oct. 1 to get their plants set.The root crop grows best in moderately deep, highly fertile, well-drained soil with a pH 6.2 to 6.8. A general recommendation for rutabagas is two to five pounds of 10-10-10 fertilizer per 100 square feet, he said. Lower rates should be used on heavier or sandier soils. “To determine whether you need to fertilize, you should first have your soil tested through your local UGA Cooperative Extension office,” Kelley said. “Fertilizer applications should be based on the soil test’s recommendations.”Once you have determined your fertilizer rate, apply half at planting and half four weeks later, he said.last_img read more

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Zion Williamson on leading Duke: ‘I don’t feel the pressure’

first_imgZion Williamson has played an integral role in leading Duke during the regular season and through the NCAA Tournament, but the star forward said he doesn’t “really feel the pressure.” At just 18 years old, Williamson has come up big down the stretch when the Blue Devils needed it most. Of the four conference games Duke lost this season, Williamson was out for three recovering from a knee sprain. He helped secure the ACC Tournament victory against North Carolina with 31 points and 11 rebounds. And when it looked like Central Florida was going to win the second round of the NCAA Tournament, Williamson dropped another 32 points and 11 rebounds.  But Williamson doesn’t believe he needs to have a “monster game” every night because of the depth Duke has with freshmen R.J. Barrett and Cam Reddish. “I don’t feel the pressure to have that every game because we have a lot of talented players on this team,” Williamson told reporters. “So like we just move the ball and attack. And whoever has the hot hand, that’s who is going to have the monster night.” Related News Mike Krzyzewski on Duke’s freshmen: ‘If you like basketball, you should like these kids’ Junior forward Jack White gave credit to Williamson for how he has handled the expectations this season.“He always handles it all in a great way,” White said (via USA Today). “Just being around him every day, if you didn’t know that, then you’d have no idea about all the attention he receives. He’s just like another guy on our team, really, in how he acts and carries himself. And as a teammate, he’s just great. He’s just all about winning. He just lets his game do the talking.”center_img Coach Mike Krzyzewski, however, acknowledged “there’s pressure on us all the time” and addressed some of the expectations that come from being a Blue Devil.“You have to make sure that you’re adapting to coaching a young group at this time in civilization, and not four years ago or five years ago,” Krzyzewski said. “And these guys have been really good to adapt to. Our program has incredibly high expectations from within and from without. And that’s good. And so if we succeed, we succeed famously. And if we do not succeed, we have tried to succeed famously. And I like that aspect of our program immensely.”East Region’s top-seed Duke will face No. 4 Virginia Tech in the Sweet 16 on Friday, with tip off set for 9:39 p.m. ET. Duke star Zion Williamson explains why he never considered shutting it down after injurylast_img read more

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James Berry Quirk, 82, Oxford: Nov. 29, 1931 – Dec. 30, 2013

first_imgJames Barry Quirk, age 82, died Monday, December 30, 2013 at Riverview Manor Nursing Home in Oxford, KS.  He was a retired Major in the United States Air Force.James Barry Quirk was born on November 29, 1931 in Cincinnati, Ohio to Thomas Walter Quirk and Edna Ethel (Quisenberry) Quirk.  He graduated from Evanston High School in Evanston, IL in 1949.  He joined the United States Air Force in June of 1954.Barry married Eleanor Ann (Bartelson) Fultz on October 12, 1968 in Newkirk, OK.  She preceded him in death in December of 2004.He enjoyed music, playing the piano, reading, crossword puzzles, watching television, and visiting with family.He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Ann; two brothers, John Quirk and Thomas Quirk.Survivors include his sisters-in-law, Christine Quirk of Wilton Manors, FL, Janie Wilson and Claudine Bartelson both of Wellington, KS; and several nieces and nephews.Memorial Services will be held at Frank Funeral Home on January 11, 2014, at 2:00 P.M.   Pastor Danny Ginn will officiate.  Interment will follow the service at Prairie Lawn Cemetery.There will be no visitation as cremation has taken place.A memorial has been established with the Avenue of Flags.  Contributions can be left at the funeral home.Frank Funeral Home has been entrusted with the arrangements.To leave condolences or sign our guest book, please visit our website at www.frankfuneralhome.netlast_img read more

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