How Millennials Are Moving the Housing Market

Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago February 20, 2019 2,907 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / How Millennials Are Moving the Housing Market Tagged with: Affordability Baby Boomers Down Payment Gen-X Home Home Prices Homebuyers HOUSING Millennials mortgage Realtor.com How Millennials Are Moving the Housing Market The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Capital Living: America’s Best Cities to Reside in Next: Examining Third-Party Purchasers’ Role in Foreclosure Proceedings in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Affordability Baby Boomers Down Payment Gen-X Home Home Prices Homebuyers HOUSING Millennials mortgage Realtor.com 2019-02-20 Radhika Ojha Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Related Articles Affordability, low down payments, and less traditional secondary markets with an abundance of jobs and homes are just some of the things that millennials look at while purchasing a home, according to an analysis by Realtor.com. The analysis also found that millennials are taking on larger mortgages when compared with the older generations.Millennials have also started looking beyond starter homes. Despite a lower median purchase price of $238,000 for a starter home compared to Gen-Xers and baby boomers, the analysis indicated that millennials were increasing their purchase price at a faster rate than previous generations, indicating more buying power.They’re also becoming the largest mortgage purchasers by the number of loans originated, “surpassing Generation X as their leader in January 2017. As 2018 came to a close, millennials took on nearly half of all new mortgages compared with 36 percent for Gen X and 17 percent for baby boomers.”Despite these growing numbers, the study indicated that millennial homebuying was driven by affordability as this demographic tended to make lower down payments compared to other generations. The analysis indicated that down payments by millennials averaged 8.8 percent in December 2018, compared to 11.9 percent for Generation X and 17.7 percent for “the more equity-rich” baby boomers.”Millennials are getting older, with better jobs and deeper pockets, allowing them to expand their collective purchase power, and hence, their footprint in the market,” said Javier Vivas, Director of Economic Research at realtor.com. “The stereotype that millennials primarily choose to buy homes and live in large metro areas isn’t the reality. Results show millennials’ expansion is more heavily conditioned by affordability than in prior years, so their eyes are set on less traditional secondary markets where homes and jobs are now available and plentiful.”While Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, and Columbus ranked among the top housing markets preferred by millennials, Gen X-ers purchased homes in strong job markets and secondary home markets. Los Angeles, Providence, Bridgeport, Jacksonville, and Atlanta ranked among the top five markets for Gen-Xers.For baby boomers, the top five markets were Knoxville, Sacramento, Memphis, Oklahoma City, and Riverside. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. About Author: Radhika Ojha Subscribe read more

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moe., Kyle Hollingsworth & The Nth Power To Play Pisgah Brewing Anniversary Show

first_imgOn Saturday, April 22nd, the Pisgah Brewing Company in Black Mountain, NC will celebrate its 12th anniversary with a blowout day filled with musical performances. The brewery has just announced their lineup, with moe., Kyle Hollingsworth Band and The Nth Power all scheduled to perform.moe. will be playing two sets at the event, with Kyle Hollingsworth and The Nth Power each delivering a set to get the party into high gear. With great music and high quality Pisgah beer on tap, there will be no shortage of great times ahead!Check out more information on the Pisgah official website.last_img

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Professor analyzes history of Christmas star

first_imgAlthough most people associate Christmas with a manger, shepherds and over-booked inns, astrophysicist Grant J. Matthews from Notre Dame’s department of physics enjoys examining the Nativity story from a cosmic perspective. Matthews gave a lecture titled “What and When Was the Christmas Star?” this past weekend.  “There’s actually a wealth of astronomy about the circumstances of how we celebrate Christmas,” Matthews said. The lecture utilized Jordan Hall’s state of the art Digital Visualization Theater to explore potential explanations of the Christmas star, which is described in the Gospel of Matthew. “Within our 10 computers here, we have programmed in memory every star, every object in the sky known to humankind. We can calculate their trajectory and where they’ve been, so we can go forward and back in time,” Matthews said. “Using this, we can go back to the time when that Christmas star first appeared and see how the sky might have appeared to the Magi and might have signaled that there was a newborn ruler in Judea.” Matthews said the Magi were early astrologers who searched for meaning in the carefully followed movements of celestial objects. “[The Magi] believed that each sign of the zodiac referred to a different time of the year and a different geographic location of the world,” he said. The night sky the Magi studied 2,000 years ago is distinctly different from the one we know today, Matthews said. “The location of the vernal equinox changes with time,” he said. “The vernal equinox was just departing the constellation of Aries, which actually fixed a lot of the lore of the time.” Aries, the first sign of the zodiac, is symbolized by a lamb and was considered by the Magi to signify Judea. “Something that would have been seen as important at the time would be represented by something occurring in the constellation Aries,” he said. Though scientists are unsure about what exactly this phenomenon was, Matthews said the four most likely theories suggest it was a comet, nova, supernova, or conjunction of planets. Using records of the Chinese Court, researchers discovered a few comets and supernovae that occurred near the time of Jesus’s birth, Mathews said.  However, Matthews does not think that the Magi would interpret these occurrences as joyous indications of a great leader being born.   “[Comets, novae, and supernovae] were seen as harbingers of a great disaster.  For example, each comet is associated with some catastrophic event: the death of Cleopatra, the death of Caesar, these were not harbingers of joy, they were warnings of disaster” Matthews said. Rather, Matthews said he believes the most likely explanation for what the Magi saw in the sky lies within our own solar system. “[The Magi] would be very concerned with the location of the planets. What they would look for would be where planets line up. Around 6 BC, the sun, Jupiter, and the moon are all in Aries and Venus and Saturn are right next door,” he said. This grouping of planets would have been interpreted eagerly by the Magi. Matthews said different objects in the solar system were thought to represent different symbolic meanings. “Jupiter is the symbol of a powerful leader. The moon means that the leader had a special appointed destiny in their death. Saturn indicated a giving of life. A powerful leader, a newborn king, born in the land of Judea in our time frame of interest.” Matthews said he believes this grouping closely matches the one reported in the original nativity story, sayingd the “Christmas star” most likely refers to this unusual grouping of celestial bodies.   Contact Grace McCormack at [email protected]last_img read more

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If It Scares You, Do It: Rappelling Is Within Reach

first_imgWhy limit your outdoor experiences to the familiar hiking trails and hanging in a hammock? The stunts you see outdoor pros pull off on TV are within your reach once you make the decision to attack a new experience.For those who want some on the edge fun, nothing quite compares to the experience of making your way down a tall cliff or rock face while depending on the rope, carabiners, and your own inner strength. Rappelling is a rite of passage within the climbing community and is a great way to return to the base of a mountain after a climb or hiking experience that involves a descent elevation gain and can be enjoyed by people of all skill sets.Petit Dru, the peak where rappelling was first attempted.Photo by camptocamp.orgThe creation of the adrenaline filled experience is credited to Jean Estéril Charlet, a French climber based in Chamonix. Rappelling or abseiling (as it is know in the rest of the world), was first practiced while Charles made his descent from the Petit Dru, a sharp peak in the French Alps in 1876. By the turn of the century, rappelling gained in popularity throughout the climbing world. Climbers from all over the world tried taking the idea and developing it even further. Successfully doing so, Otto Herzog, a German climber and inventor first introduced the use of carabiners to the sport in 1911.Since that time, rappelling has transformed the outdoor recreation world with many different variations of knots, harnesses, and techniques tailored for different types of terrain. Three main types of rappelling practiced today are the standard rappel where a person’s back faces the ground with face up while descending a ledge. A free rappel is a technique often practiced by covers where a person’s body is suspended in open space while they slide down the rope to solid ground. Lastly and certainly not least is the Australian rappel that puts a climber to the ultimate test of facing downward while making their descent.Rapelling is now used as a military training technique, a means to rescue people, and amongst many other purposes it is also a recreational pursuit for thrill seekers and those wanting to branch out a bit, putting their fears and limits to the test.Defying your brain’s normalized laws of gravity, rappelling successfully and with much control can involve putting your body at a 90 degree angle and walking down a massive steep rock backwards. Scary as it may seem, many who have tried it can only seen to boast on how exhilarating the adventure is from start to finish. Like many outdoor pursuits, rappelling can happen just about anywhere from the side of a building to a mountaintop. A specific location that is popular in many guided rappelling and climbing adventures is waterfalls both as their waters are rushing in the warmer months and while frozen in the winter.For an immersive adventure on the edge without the costs of buying your own gear, you can give it a try on a guided trip on your next vacation or right near your home within the Blue Ridge Mountains. Many guided trips will assist you in your journey by providing gear, transportation, instruction, guides and sometimes even meals for a pretty fair price. An excursion of climbing and rappelling beginning at 9:30 a.m. and ending at 4 p.m. for an individual who is a beginner and over the age of 10 near Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina goes for $129. When factoring in the thrills with the views you would have combined with the comfort of knowing you are with practiced professionals that will keep you entirely safe, that’s not too bad!The saying goes, “If it scares you, do it.” So maybe this summer is the summer of chasing after a new adventure like rappelling. If there’s one guarantee in going after an experience like it, it’s that you won’t go home unchanged. For some tips and techniques to get started off in the world of rappelling, check out this article from Climbing Magazine and view the video below produced by REI.last_img read more

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Inner City

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