Brazilian Navy Brings Together Marines from Brazil and Partner Nations

first_imgBy Andréa Barretto/Diálogo December 06, 2017 Located in the dry climate and high temperatures of the state of Goiás (100 kilometers from Brasilia), Formosa Training Camp rests in Brazil’s central region. Operation Formosa took place in this desert-like landscape. The annual training is the largest of the Brazilian Navy’s (MB, per its Portuguese acronym) Fleet Marine Squad (FFE, per its Portuguese acronym). One of the operation’s main objectives is to test “the Fleet Marine Squad’s logistics capacity and the marine’s strength,” explained Brazilian Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel Helcio Blacker Espozel Junior, an officer in FFE’s Operations Command. The harsh climate and distance from FFE—headquartered in the state of Rio de Janeiro—contributed to Camp Formosa’s selection as the site of the operation. The exercise aims to develop missions with more military personnel trained to shoot with the largest variety of weapons. Operation Formosa 2017, held October 4th–16th, involved about 1,700 service members. The number included MB professionals, two service members from the Brazilian Air Force, and 15 foreign service members from the United States, Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and France. Foreign participation Foreign officers acted as observers, sharing experiences in their areas of expertise. U.S. service members were an exception as they actively participated “in planning and development of the CFN’s Artillery Battalion, Tactical Air Control and Air Defense Battalion, and Expeditionary Medical Unit,” said U.S. Marine Corps Captain Jose M. Negrete, the public affairs officer with U.S. Marine Corps Forces South. The participation of the United States in Operation Formosa began in 2013, with six to 20 representatives attending each year. “We recognize Formosa is an excellent opportunity for the U.S. Marine Corps to build interoperability with Brazil while also strengthening both forces’ readiness,” Capt. Negrete said. Capt. Negrete also emphasized the factors confirming the importance of teamwork among American nations. “Devastating weather patterns have had significant impact throughout the region over the last several years and highlighted the need for coordinated relief efforts,” Capt. Negrete said. “This is why we continue to improve our integration with Brazilian forces through exercises such as Formosa.” Deployment and demonstration The first phase of the operation consists of the journey from FFE’s base in Rio de Janeiro to Formosa Training Camp. In 2017, more than 1,600 kilometers were covered in four days. Along the way, rest areas and three combat services support detachments, with personnel to perform equipment maintenance required during troop movement, were made available. Once in Formosa, the first three days of the operation were devoted to train for the final phase of the exercise known as the tactical theme—an exercise in which participants have to put all their knowledge into practice in a mock real world situation. Next, participants performed an operational demonstration to give the public—service members and journalists, among others—an overview of what happens during Operation Formosa. For more than three days, service members took charge of the battlefield. Based on the framework of an amphibious operation, the teams’ mission was to solve the problem Formosa’s coordinators put forth. “During this phase, members of a control group monitored serviced members to evaluate the procedures and review lessons learned. The lessons are later shared so procedures can be improved,” Lt. Col. Espozel said. An amphibious operation is launched from sea toward a coastal area. Troops advance on the terrain and fulfill certain objectives. Since Formosa is not on the sea, its existence is imagined on maps. “To be able to simulate an amphibious operation, maps are prepared with the outline of the sea bordering Formosa Training Camp,” Lt. Col. Espozel explained. “With this mock sea, planning is done the same way it would in a real world operation, with all of the phases unfolding according to plan.” In the final phase of the activities, different equipment, such as combat vehicles, aircraft, armored vehicles, amphibious vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles, were used in offensive and defensive military maneuvers. Operation Formosa also put to use all the weapons in the Brazilian Marine Corps’ arsenal with live munitions—the Multiple Rocket Launcher Battery was the highlight. “The Brazilian Marine Corps is a professional, rapid-response troop of an expeditionary nature par excellence. Training with live munitions is considered basic for our marines’ professional development,” Lt. Col. Espozel noted. According to his assessment, the service members’ performance in the final phase of Operation Formosa exceeded expectations.last_img read more

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After suffering multiple injuries, Syracuse outside hitter Wlaszczuk becoming consistent contributor

first_imgGosia Wlaszczuk always heard the benefits of playing in the United States.While playing for Polish professional club AZS Bialystok in high school, she received advice and guidance from teammates, some of whom were 10 years older than her. Though she was already playing at a high level, Wlaszczuk seized the opportunity to play in the United States and study at Syracuse University.“The most important thing for me was to study,” Wlaszczuk said. “I knew if I stayed in Poland and played in this professional league I would never play and study at the same time.”Injuries have hampered Wlaszczuk’s play in her first year as an outside hitter at Syracuse. But she’s worked to overcome her setbacks and become a solid contributor for the Orange in a season where lineups have shifted constantly.“Gosia’s been consistent, like a utility player,” Syracuse assistant coach Stephanie Cantway said. “We’ve used her as a setter, we’ve used her as a libero, we’ve used her as an outside, we’ve used her as a right side, we’ve used her as pretty much everything except a middle.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWlaszczuk said she has the talent to be a great player on the college level. She hasn’t been able to show her best to her teammates and coaches yet because of a string of injuries.In her senior year of high school, Wlaszczuk broke her leg while playing with AZS Bialystok. Though the injury held her back from much of her last season, a mutual friend of Wlaszczuk’s and Syracuse head coach Leonid Yelin sent her game tape to the Syracuse program. She was then offered a chance to play in the United States.Wlaszczuk said she didn’t take her training seriously in the summer between high school and college. She came to Syracuse out of shape and injured herself again in her first practice at SU.“I came here in my first practice after four months of not doing anything,” Wlaszczuk said. “I started serving or hitting and my shoulder was just destroyed.”That injury held Wlaszczuk out of practice for most of the preseason. Since then, she’s pulled stomach muscles and hurt her thigh.“Basically, she didn’t come in good shape, and that’s why there have been so many injuries,” Yelin said.Wlaszczuk has played well through the injuries. Though she’s only played 59 sets in her freshman year, she ranks third on the Orange in assists and fifth in kills. She’s stepped up in some big moments, tallying 14 kills in a loss to Louisville when leading scorer Silvi Uattara was limited to just two kills.Wlaszczuk finally feels like she’s getting healthy enough to perform near her best. She’s watched her teammates improve all season, making her own situation more frustrating. She’s starting to feel more comfortable with only four games remaining on the Orange schedule.But she knows she needs to improve her training habits this offseason.“Now I think I’m getting to my shape, finally, when we have four games left,” Wlaszczuk said. “I need to work harder in January and go to the gym more when I’m home. Hopefully I won’t have these injuries next year.” Comments Published on October 30, 2012 at 12:21 am Contact Jacob: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Local teams showcase skills in weekend basketball tournament

first_imgIt was quite a successful weekend for our local seniors, as both the boys’ and girls’ teams went undefeated throughout the entire tournament.It was a hard fought start to the tournament for the NPSS senior girls’ team, who defeated Dawson Creek in a back-and-forth game, 44-34. Following their challenging first game, the ladies cruised through the remainder of the weekend tournament, beating Fort Nelson 48-12, Grande Prairie Comp 60-26 and finally defeating the NPSS junior girls 65-45.Much like the senior girls, the senior boys were a dominant force throughout the two day tournament, going undefeated to emerge as champions.- Advertisement -The boys opened their tournament against the Grande Prairie Comp’s junior boys’ team, winning 73-47, followed by a 100-49 victory over Fort Nelson, and then easily getting by the senior squad from Dawson Creek in their final game.NPSS athletes were recognized following the conclusion of competition, as tournament MVPs were awarded to Miles Savard and Pam Sandberg, both students at North Peace Secondary.The weekend was a good warm up for the senior boys, who will now shift their focus to Prince George, where they will play in another basketball tournament this weekend.Advertisementlast_img read more

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