Elkhart to end moratorium on utility shutoffs and late fees

first_img Elkhart to end moratorium on utility shutoffs and late fees IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market By Tommie Lee – April 14, 2021 0 201 Facebook Google+ Facebook Pinterest Google+ (“electric meters” by jasonwoodhead23, CC BY 2.0) Elkhart’s moratorium on late fees and utility shutoffs will end next month, according to city officials.The Elkhart Truth reports that the city will notify customers in advance of the change. The public health emergency in Indiana is set to expire on April 30, so Elkhart’s Public Works and Utilities are spending this final month informing the public about the change.It’s hoped that this will give customers enough time to make the necessary payment arrangements and avoid any disconnection issues. WhatsApp Previous articleBBB warns of tutor scam targeting cheating studentsNext articleDoctors trying to put Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause into perspective Tommie Lee Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

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FlexConnect – New Soybean Inoculant Technology

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio-based Morral Companies have been early adopters of Flex Connect soybean inoculant technology from Verdesian Life Sciences. The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins traveled to north central Ohio to learn about this new innovation and see it an action.last_img

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Indoor Condensation Plagues This Chicago Home

first_imgSite-Built Ventilation Baffles for RoofsPreventing Water Entry Into a HomeFans in the Attic: Do They Help or Do They Hurt? Designing a Good Ventilation SystemDo Humidifiers Create IAQ Problems?Moisture Sources, Relative Humidity, and Mold Can costs be recouped?Andersen expects to live in the house for another 10 years, and would like to leave it in good condition for future owners. But carrying out more air sealing work and installing an ERV doesn’t look like the best use of money at this stage.Pat Andersen’s Chicago home was built 33 years ago, and despite a variety of energy upgrades it still needs some help in the attic.“I won’t recoup that cost and the house doesn’t have cold rooms or uncomfortable living conditions, in my opinion,” Andersen writes. “If I was building again I would be all in for a perfectly tight air quality home, but at some point you have to ask yourself what is feasible and what is affordable when dealing with homes built before all the standards were in place and changing continuously. I can assure you that my home would not reap the financial benefit when selling to offset what it would cost me to achieve these standards. On a fixed income you have to weigh the options.”Forget the air-sealing work and the ERV for the moment, Holladay replies. No one is suggesting those steps.“Dana and I are advising you to improve the R-value of the insulation above your ceiling and to disable the humidifier,” he says. “This is not air-sealing work; this is insulation work. It won’t affect whether or not your house needs an ERV.”Taking it one step further, Dorsett says that if “payback” is what’s really important, Andersen should do nothing but paint over moldy sections of the ceiling when it’s time to sell.“Air-sealing and insulation will pay back in marginally better comfort if not dollars,” he says. “If your wintertime indoor air is so dry that you need to actively humidify to get it up to 30% relative humidity, air-sealing alone would fix that.” Ventilation advice“You may need mechanical ventilation even now,” Dorsett writes. “Even air-leaky houses need ventilation. The random air leak points in a house does not guarantee that the ventilation air is going to where it’s needed or that it’s provided via an uncontaminated path. Higher air leakage does not in any way ensure good air quality.”Ventilation could come in the form an exhaust-only system, which Dorsett says is pretty cheap. Andersen could consider a part of ductless vents made by Lunos , which would be fairly simple to retrofit.“A pair of ductless Lunos e2 or Lunos Nexxt HRV vents (they work in pairs) should be comparatively easy to retrofit if it came to that, and should assuage the conscience of the air sealing and insulation contractor, even if it isn’t capable of meeting the ASHRAE 62.2 ventilation rates (which are arguably much higher than necessary, and almost never met anyway),” Dorsett says. “Then you would at least know the source and path the ventilation air, unlike continuous exhaust-only approach.” Add more insulationGBA senior editor Martin Holladay suggests that Andersen add more insulation in the attic. The R-25 fiberglass batts provide roughly half the thermal insulation recommended in current codes.“Someone needs to go up to your attic and improve the insulation thickness (R-value) of the ceiling near your soffits,” Holladay writes. “The perimeter of your attic, where the rafters approach the top plates of your walls, has thin insulation. This is common.“Ideally, your attic would have a full thickness of insulation (R-49) extending out to cover the top plates of your walls,” he continues. “In some houses, this is impossible, because the builders forgot to specify raised heel trusses, and there is insufficient room between the top plates of the walls and the underside of the roof sheathing to accommodate the needed insulation.”In situations like this, a common solution is to use a two-component spray foam kit. They’re not cheap, but the closed-cell spray foam provides much more thermal insulation per inch than does cellulose or fiberglass, making up for a lack of room in the area above wall plates with a higher R-value.“In most cases, you’ll want to install wind-washing dams and ventilation baffles before this work is performed,” Holladay says. “While you’re at it, disable the humidifier. The humidifier is contributing to your problem. Unplug it, or turn off the valve that supplies water to the humidifier, or hit it with a baseball bat.”Dana Dorsett also thinks the problem can be traced to missing insulation, or possibly a path for outdoor air from the soffit vents that is somehow getting underneath the attic insulation. But in any event, humidification should not be necessary, especially with the airtightness test results that Andersen has in hand.“Active humidifidification would almost never be necessary in a house that tested at 1710 cfm50,” Dorsett says. “A house that tight can usually be kept at a comfortable and healthy 30-35% relative humidity at 70°F in winter simply by controlling the ventilation rate. Unless there are specific health problems that require higher relative humidity, hold the line at 35% RH, no higher during the coldest 8-10 weeks of winter. If it creeps up above that point, ventilate. A few $10 Accurite monitors distributed to a few place in the house make it pretty easy to tell if the humidity is creeping up.” Our expert’s opinionHere’s what GBA technical director Peter Yost had to say:It’s nice to start off my wrap-up with the problem pretty much solved: Deactivating both the humidification in the central space conditioning system and the powered ventilator in the attic will save the homeowner wasted energy and improve the moisture performance.A few key points from my perspective:ERV vs. HRV in cold climates in the winter: The latter dehumidifies (incidentally) better than the former. So if you are looking to control wintertime interior relative humidity, go with the HRV.Identifying the source(s) of interior moisture: It’s always good practice to follow the water in any building, establishing just what the main sources and strengths of the sources are, as described in this GBA blog.Measuring relative humidity (RH): This is a surprisingly difficult thing to do. In the attached photo (see Image #2 below), taken in my basement just a couple of days ago, you can see two types of Onset HOBO temperature/RH data loggers and one Omega 4-in-1 meter, with quite a range of measurements for RH (from 19.9% to 27.9%) and a pretty tight grouping of dry bulb temperatures.Each of these instruments cost considerably more than $100, and have a rated accuracy of plus or minus less than 1 F°, with RH accuracy ranging from +/- 2.5% to +/- 4%.I will be covering RH measurement in more detail in an upcoming Building Science blog, but while we absolutely need to encourage occupants to ensure they have the ability to measure RH, we need to be careful about just what we recommend. Inexpensive hygrometers — such as the most basic Accurite units — have a stated +/- 10% accuracy, and that just may not be good enough for guidance. RELATED ARTICLES center_img Pat Andersen and her husband have been diligent about energy upgrades and maintenance on their 33-year-old Chicago home. They’ve sealed air leaks in the attic floor, replaced leaky windows, and checked the airtightness of the house with a blower-door test.But one problem remains: condensation in the form or water droplets or frost on some ceilings on the second floor. Andersen would love to find a solution.“I have a masonry/frame two-story house that’s 33 years old,” Andersen writes in a Q&A post at Green Building Advisor. I have R-25 fiberglass insulation in the attic, R-13 in the walls. I had my upper story exterior cedar siding replaced in 2011 with James Hardie board. The house was wrapped with Tyvek before installing the cement board.”Ever since the work was done, Andersen says, there was been condensation on ceilings in the area of soffit vents. Most problem areas show frost during the winter, but in one case there are water droplets forming on the ceiling.“I was keeping my thermostat around 56-58 degrees during the winter in this upstairs portion of the house and the lower level at 64-66 degrees in the winter,” Andersen says. “Now I’m going to keep the upstairs at 62 all the time, in hopes that this will correct the problem of the condensation. I have an automatic humidifier on my gas furnace that I keep at a bare minimal setting.” Humidity is still high, until…Armed with three new hydrometers, Andersen can report relative humidity measures 51% to 62% in one upstairs bedroom when the average temperature is 59-62°F; in another bedroom with the same temperature, the relative humidity is 50% to 60%. Outdoor temperatures have ranged from 32°F to 68°F.That’s high, says Charlie Sullivan. A relative humidity of 50% is the most you’d want during the winter. A better level would be 35% to 40%.“It’s hard to know whether this is due to the fact that you have been deliberately humidifying your house for years, causing everything in your house to be saturated, or due to some other source of moisture,” Holladay adds.A month later, however, Andersen has better news:“Well it’s been a month now since this conversation started and I wanted to give you an update as to how things have been going,” Andersen writes. “Since taking your advice and turning off the humidifier on the furnace and the powered attic fan, the humidity level is staying at 40% with a thermostat set at 62°F upstairs when outdoor temperatures have ranged from 4-19°F outside this past week. Plus my house feels so much warmer. Almost too warm! My bedroom ceilings don’t show any signs of condensation and we do have a good deal of snow on the roof, so no signs of great heat loss. The first floor humidity is averaging between 30-34% with temp set at 66°F.” Get rid of that powered attic ventilatorIn Comment #12, Andersen provides additional information: her house has a powered attic ventilator. This fan is a potentially big problem, Dorsett says, because it a much more powerful air-leakage driver than the stack effect alone.The powered attic fan, Holladay adds, could help explain why the condensation is showing up in ceilings adjacent to soffit vents.“You may be the first homeowner to post on GBA with both a humidifier and a powered attic ventilator,” Holladay tells Andersen. “Lucky for you, we’re simplifying your life and lowering your energy bills by telling you which appliances need to be unplugged — now. Disabling these two unnecessary (and harmful) appliances may be enough to entirely solve your condensation problem.” A blower-door test measures leaks of 1,710 cubic feet per minute at a pressure difference of 50 pascals, “pretty tight” in Andersen’s view. Andersen has been given conflicting advice on whether to run a fan and humidifier, and she’s told she needs an energy-recovery ventilator — an unwelcome expense.“I’m confused. but mostly I want the condensation to go away,” Andersen says. “Please, do you have any advice I can take away and live without my ceilings being ruined or take a chance of mold developing in the attic?”Those are the clues for this Q&A Spotlight. What’s the answer?last_img read more

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Liv Tyler flashes underwear

first_imgActress Liv Tyler accidentally flashed her undergarment when she stepped out here.During her recent outing, “The Leftovers” star suffered wardrobe malfunction, flashing her thigh and black underwear as the strong wind blew, reports aceshowbiz.com.She sported a black-and-blue wraparound dress and a pair of sunglasses and was apparently unaware of the incident. Actress Liv Tyler accidentally flashed her undergarment when she stepped out here.last_img

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Hundreds Say Goodbye to Late Mayor of Portmore

first_img Hundreds of persons turned out on Thursday, October 17, to pay final respects to the late Mayor of Portmore, George Egbert Emmanuel Lee, at the Official funeral, held at the Power of Faith Ministries Church, in Portmore, St. Catherine.Mr. Lee, who held the distinction of being Jamaica’s and the English-speaking Caribbean’s first directly elected Mayor, passed away on September 29, after a brief illness. He was 74.Initially elected as Mayor in 2003, following Portmore’s attainment of municipal status, Mr. Lee was in his second term in office, which commenced in 2012, when he passed away.Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change Minister, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, who represented Prime Minister the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, who is off the island;  and Opposition Leader, Andrew Holness,  headed the list of Parliamentary officials attending the service. Also in attendance were Mayors and other Local Government representatives.Mr. Pickersgill and Mr. Holness read the First and Second Scripture Lessons, respectively.Custos of St. Catherine, Hon. Rev. Sophia Azan, headed parish leaders and residents who also attended the service. Also present were students from several schools across Portmore. Several of the youngsters lined sections of the roadway leading to the Church bearing flags, which they waved in tribute to Mr. Lee.Many persons turned up at the church well over two hours before the funeral service’s  scheduled 11:00 a.m. start, in the hope of getting a final look at the man who was widely referred to as ‘Mr. Portmore’, as a result of  Mr. Lee’s passion for the municipality’s development.Final viewing of his body took place between 10:00 and 10:45 a.m., after the flag-draped casket was brought in by the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) bearer party and positioned adjacent to the church’s main entrance.Glowing tributes in song, dance, and speech honouring the life and work of Mr. Lee flowed abundantly. Family man, hero, visionary leader, people person, politically unbiased, and industrious were some of the accolades used to describe him.State Minister for Local Government and Community Development, and Member of Parliament for South east St. Catherine, which incorporates sections of Portmore, Hon. Colin Fagan, led the tributes.Mr. Fagan described Mr. Lee as a ‘no-nonsense’ and ‘strong willed’ person, who devoted his life to Portmore’s welfare.“As Mayor, he was able to lobby for the establishment of a tax office in Portmore, the placement of (a) Jamaica Public Service Company Limited office in Portmore, land for the building of the Portmore bus park in Naggo Head…(and development of) seven community parks within the municipality, among other things,” he outlined.The State Minister noted that at the time of Mr. Lee’s passing, he was lobbying for the construction of a permanent municipal office for the council, and establishment of a hospital.“George Lee was an example to members of both sides of the political divide, as he was always giving of his best (for) the people of Portmore. I am happy that the Portmore Municipal Council named a road (the George Lee Boulevard) in his honour. We have lost a strong leader, and when the history of Portmore is written, his name will be on every page,” Mr. Fagan said.In her tribute, Rev. Azan said Mr. Lee’s passing has left a vacuum both in Portmore and the nation in general that will be hard to fill.“He was a dedicated, committed public servant who will be remembered for his unstinting service to local government and certainly one (example) of good governance for the sustainable development of Portmore. His political career and contribution to nation building has left a legacy that will be long remembered,” Rev. Azan said.Mr. Lee’s sister, Beverly Santouse, who delivered the eulogy, said he was the first of five children for their parents, and held the “most enviable position” as the only boy.She recounted her father’s decision to also name her brother Emmanuel “because he knew that his son…was destined for greatness…prophecy fulfilled.”Mrs. Santouse said Mr. Lee was industrious, with a penchant for punctuality, traits which she pointed out underpinned his professional, vocational and philanthropic pursuits in Jamaica and the United States.She said the late Mayor was a caring family man who loved children and was an active member of the Portmore United Church for over 20 years.“George was a humble man; he was respected by all he met. The simplest person in the community was George’s friend. He met with Governors-General, Prime Ministers, foreign visitors, and he never lost the common touch. And now that his mission has been completed, he is at rest with his Father,” she added.Pastor of the Portmore United Church, Rev. L. Christopher Mason, who delivered the Homily, noted the “air of victory” celebrating the life of Mr. Lee, that was evident in the proceedings, throughout the funeral service.“There (was) no sense of heaviness or spirit of mourning (clouding) the atmosphere today. Rather, it’s the sweet triumph of a life well lived,” he pointed out.Rev. Mason contended that the life of persons like Mr. Lee “cannot be considered in mere nostalgic terms or simply in personal sentimental reflections.”“The reach of truly good men transcends the limits of our mortality and continues to make a difference in the lives of those who succeed them. Today we celebrate a life that was well lived, the life of our brother, George Lee,” he added.The body of Mr. Lee, who is survived by widow, Aneita Lee; daughter, Claudette Lee; three stepsons, Norman, Andrew and Rojah; sisters, nephews, nieces, cousins, grandchildren, great children and other relatives, was interred at Dovecot Memorial Gardens, St. Catherine. Story Highlights Mr. Lee, who held the distinction of being Jamaica’s and the English-speaking Caribbean’s first directly elected Mayor, passed away on September 29, after a brief illness. Hundreds of persons turned out on Thursday, October 17, to pay final respects to the late Mayor of Portmore, George Egbert Emmanuel Lee. Many persons turned up at the church well over two hours before the funeral service’s scheduled 11:00 a.m. start, in the hope of getting a final look at the man who was widely referred to as ‘Mr. Portmore’.last_img read more

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Stratford Festival explores painful chapter of Canadas past in The Komagata Maru

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Twitter Written by Sharon Pollock, the play is based on the 1914 incident involving 376 passengers, nearly all Sikhs, travelling aboard the Japanese steamship Komagata Maru.The Indian immigrants arrived off the coast of B.C., only to be denied entry into Vancouver, which at the time was the country’s most diverse city. Immigration regulations back then required migrants to arrive in Canada directly from their country of origin — a journey that was virtually impossible in 1914.With the exception of 20 passengers who had previously lived in Canada, officials refused to allow the Indian immigrants in, even though they were British subjects just like every other Canadian at the time. The vessel returned to India, where 19 of the passengers were killed in a skirmish with British authorities and dozens of others were imprisoned or forced into hiding.The Komagata Maru was forced to return to India, where some of the passengers were killed in a clash with police.The Canadian and B.C. governments have both issued formal apologies for the incident.The Indian-born, Canadian-raised Ahluwalia was a 19-year-old university student when she first learned of the Komagata Maru. The vocalist and composer revisited the story a few years ago when she composed a song for Alik Khazni’s Continuous Journey, an award-winning documentary about the incident.In the play, she portrays The Woman, serving as the voice for the people aboard the steamship.Actress Kiran Ahluwalia sits for a portrait at the Avon Theatre during a June rehearsal for The Komagata Maru Incident, in Stratford, Ont. (Hannah Yoon/The Canadian Press)Actress Kiran Ahluwalia sits for a portrait at the Avon Theatre during a June rehearsal for The Komagata Maru Incident, in Stratford, Ont. (Hannah Yoon/The Canadian Press)Ahluwalia was asked by the director to compose lyrics in Punjabi and the melody based on a Punjabi fable that mirrors the storyline.“Parts of this song are interspersed throughout the play,” she said. “It’s one song, but it has different arcs and different emotions in it as it runs through the play.”Indigenous actress and playwright Quelemia Sparrow makes her Stratford debut as T.S., playing the role of a master of ceremonies.“I just think it’s so important to have that presence in the piece, with the 150-year birthday for Canada, that we’re acknowledging the First Peoples of this land, and that we’ve been on this land for thousands and thousands of years,” said Sparrow, who is from Vancouver and a member of the Musqueam Nation. “I was saying to Keira… that on some level my presence in the piece is like I’m welcoming her people to the land in the way they should have been welcome.”The Komagata Maru Incident is onstage at Stratford’s Studio Theatre until Sept. 24. Advertisementcenter_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Actress Quelemia Sparrow sits for a portrait at the Avon Theatre during a June rehearsal for The Komagata Maru Incident, in Stratford, Ont. (Hannah Yoon/The Canadian Press) The Stratford Festival is revisiting a painful chapter in Canada’s history with The Komagata Maru Incident, but the show’s stars say it is vital to continue addressing the issues at the core of the century-old story.“I’m super excited that Stratford decided to tell this story because it is such an important story, and a lot of minority histories in Canada are forgotten — not just in Canada but the world over,” said Juno Award-winning artist Kiran Ahluwalia, who is making her debut at the festival.“It’s a wonderful recognition that this is part of Canadian history.”last_img read more

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Former Bahamas Deputy Police Commissioner collapses dies

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, April 3, 2017 – Nassau – It was confirmed by a relative, former Deputy Commissioner of the Royal Bahamas Police, Errol Farqharson passed away earlier today.  It was said he was attending doctor in Palmdale, Nassau when he today collapsed and died.#MagneticMediaNews#FormerCommissionercollapses#ErrolFarqharson Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#ErrolFarqharson, #FormerCommissionercollapses, #magneticmedianewslast_img

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