Flyers eliminate Senior Canucks from NPHL playoffs

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Rick Cleaver lived up to his nomination as the NPHL’s MVP during the regular season last night, in what ended up being the Dawson Creek Senior Canucks’ final game of the season.Things got off to a bit of a quiet start in the first period with only two penalties assessed, both of them to the Sr. Canucks. Cleaver didn’t need the an advantage to put Fort St. John up 1-0 just past the seven minute mark, assisted by Adam Horst and Dan Pappin.An early Flyers Interference penalty helped Dawson Creek tie it up just a minute and a half into the second frame, but Cleaver scored two minutes later to once again give the Flyers a one goal lead after getting a pass from Robbie Sidhu. Four minutes after that, Adam Horst made it 3-1 on a feed from Marshall Sidwell and Daylen Pearson. Though Dawson Creek did manage to gain some slight momentum with 8:03 left after scoring to move to within one, the wind quickly left the Sr. C’s sails. Josh Bruha restored Fort St. John’s two goal lead with 2:26 left, assisted by Sidhu and Joey Massingham. Shots on goal during the second were 10-7 in favour of the Flyers, while this time it was the Flyers getting two penalties called against them.- Advertisement -In the third, penalty trouble meant that the Sr. Canucks couldn’t get anything going. Massingham extended the Flyers’ lead to three just 25 seconds into the third act. Bruha and Taylor Greatrex tallied the assists on the Flyers’ fifth goal. After Dawson Creek’s Reid Smith was sent to the sin bin for a pair of minor penalties, Rick Cleaver made it 6-2 just 27 seconds later with a hat-trick goal, assisted by Horst and Brady Busche. Things continued to look grim for the Canucks, and Arlo Hadland materialized as the Grim Reaper. Hadland made it 7-2 on the power play with only 3:22 left to play, assisted by Bruha and Massingham. Though the shots were close at 29-25 in favour of the Flyers, Travis McLean stopped 23 shots to backstop the Flyers to the 7-2 victory to win the NPHL West Division semi-final in five games.The Flyers will now wait to see who they’ll play in the West Division Final, as the other semi-final between the Grande Prairie Athletics and the Spirit River Rangers will require at least six games. Spirit River leads that series three games to two, with Game 6 taking place on Saturday night in Spirit River.last_img read more

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Platmin shares listed on JSE

first_imgThe Bakgatla Ba Kgafela community, which lives near Platmin’s Pilanesberg platinum mine in North West province, seeks to develop strategies for social and economic development in the area. Shares in Platmin Limited have been made available for trading in the platinum and precious metals sector on the main board of the JSE, with effect from Wednesday. “The country is home to a sophisticated and discerning investor community,” Liddell said in Johannesburg this week. “Importantly, a JSE listing creates for our empowerment shareholders, the Bakgatla Ba Kgafela, a platform to participate in the fortunes of this company at a listed ownership level.” Natural progresson The complex, situated mostly in the North West and Limpopo provinces, is a geological structure that is estimated to contain approximately 90% of the world’s Platinum Group Metal (PGM) resources as well as some 80% of its chrome. The company is already listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the Alternative Investment Market of the London Stock Exchange in London. 24 July 2009 “Furthermore, approximately 30% of the 1 000 permanent employment positions are currently filled by people in the neighbouring community,” Liddell said. Platmin Limited is incorporated in Canada as a mineral exploration company focused on the exploration and development of platinum group metal (PGM) deposits in South Africa. Platmin chairman Keith Liddell says the listing is a natural progression for the company, which has four key projects – Pilanesberg, Mphahlele, Grootboom and Loskop – in South Africa’s Bushveld Complex. SAinfo reporter and BuaNewsWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Economic, social development Since production commenced in March this year, the mine has produced approximately 250 000 low-cost PGM ounces annually. During the construction phase, over 2 500 jobs were created at the mine.last_img read more

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Change of address… and attitude

first_imgTotal South Africa general manager of sales and marketing Qetello Zeka addresses the community of Katlegong. Community leader Thabo Molebatsi reflects on the process. A view from the front of one of the homes of the 18 relocated families. A water tank and vegetable garden can be seen to the left. Frans Lombard and Thabo Molebatsi unveil a plaque at the entrance to the settlement. The community sings the national anthem at the end of the proceedings.(Images: Valencia Talane)MEDIA CONTACTS• Jessica Chadinha Jenny Newman PR+27 11 506 7357• Andiswa GabadaCommunications coordinator: TotalSouth Africa+27 11 778 2070Valencia TalaneIn June 2012, the South African National Roads Association Limited (Sanral) embarked on a project to widen the N4 freeway between Rustenburg and Brits in the North West province. For this stretch of road, the development included the construction of a new carriageway as well as an off-ramp adjacent to the Total Petroport Magalies, a toll plaza on the N4.For the community of Katlegong in the Bapong area of Modderspruit, this would bring long-term changes they had not expected. Eighteen families would have to be moved from the land they had previously occupied, close to the existing highway, to make way for the changes. This task would not be without its challenges, both emotional and financial.The completed effort was celebrated on 23 October by the community, together with Fuelarama, a company that has operated Petroport since 1995, and its franchisor, fuel giant Total South Africa.In order for these families to retain access to the plaza, which has a Bonjour convenience shop and a Steers fast food outlet, they would have to be moved to make way for the development.“Telling someone that you’re going to make changes that affect their home is always an emotional issue,” said Fuelarama director Frans Lombard. “We obviously had to be sensitive in our approach.”Four months of hard workSanral approached Fuelarama in June, giving them a September deadline to either complete the relocation project or cut access to their business for the settlement adjacent to Katlegong. But before the physical structures could be replicated on a new piece of land, negotiations with the whole community, not just the affected families, would have to start to eliminate issues of mistrust for either party.Thabo Molebatsi, a former forecourt manager at Petroport, seemed the most obvious choice to play the role of middleman, because he’s also the chairperson of Katlegong’s Communal Property Association. He was willing to act as the liaison between Fuelarama and the community to help the two parties to come to a suitable agreement on the relocation terms. Soon enough, however, he would realise the legislative and logistical requirements of a project of this magnitude.“There was a sense of mistrust from the community, and when the initial negotiations started, demands became less and less reasonable as time went on, and there were ultimatums, ” said Molebatsi.It was at the point of a stalemate that the Department of Land Affairs was brought in to help restore either side’s faith in the process, added the community leader.Because the land in question is privately owned and was handed back to the community as part of the government’s ongoing land redistribution programme in 1999, it was imperative that the department facilitate the negotiations, while also providing support on the legislative obligations of either party.“The community needed to know that a deal like this would not come their way again,” said Molebatsi. “Even the people from Land Affairs made that clear.”Referring to South Africa’s dark history of forced relocations of black and coloured families, mainly in the 1950s and 1960s, Molebatsi said his community’s scepticism was not unfounded.“At some point I was labelled a sell-out by some elements within the community, some of whom questioned my loyalty, and that hurt because my loyalty will always be to my community as their leader.”Sustainability is keyTotal’s involvement, besides being Fuelarama’s franchisor, was to help make the project more than just about moving people from point A to B, said general manager of sales and marketing for the fuel conglomerate, Qetello Zeka.“With all our franchisees, we seek to make their CSI projects sustainable, with an entrepreneurial focus for the communities they serve,” she said. “So when Fuelarama approached us to get involved in this, our mandate was to find out what value we could add to the relocation.”A vegetable garden and several fruit trees – a very popular feature in the agriculture-orientated Magalies area – were planted, while a borehole through which running tap water is provided, was dug at the centre of the new settlement.Although the homes are of corrugated iron, a fact that Lombard said Fuelarama could not improve on because of a limited budget, the stands are bigger and are fenced, which was not the case with the previous stands. For two of the families that had already built brick structures, the company restored these to their previous state.“Some of these homes did not even have flooring at the old location,” said Lombard, “and it humbles me as a human being to be able to provide something as simple as concrete flooring for each and every one of them.“When they found out that they would get newly-paved floors – something I take for granted in my own perfectly tiled home – they were very grateful.”As for the vegetable garden and the trees, Lombard added, the aim was to add a viable element of ownership and responsibility. A small play area with swings was also added for the young children in the community.Connecting with the communityAfter four months of negotiations with the community over the project, Lombard said they have now forged a relationship with them that they had not envisaged, one that was cultivated amid weeks of heated meetings and the temptation to give up.“Today, even the children are used to seeing our faces here, and people know us by name.”Molebatsi agreed: “We went from a place of animosity and negativity to a place where everyone realises how, by negotiating what works best for everyone, we can get something out.”“We named the project ‘Selosesha’, which means ‘something new’ to symbolise that.”Sedibeng Municipality councillor Peter Makgabo gave credit to the community for their patience, joking that everyone involved virtually qualifies as a lawyer after this process because they had to be thorough.“We all learned a lot from the process, and the back and forth emails and countless meetings were well worth it.”The carriageway and off-ramp development is expected to be completed in March 2013.last_img read more

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Conservation Tillage Conference coming soon

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest High input costs coupled with low grain prices anticipated in 2016 means that growers have to make smarter, calculated choices to grow profitable crops this year.Also important is the need to build and maintain healthy soils to help ensure good water quality, said Randall Reeder, a retired Ohio State University Extension agricultural engineer. Reeder is an organizer of the annual Conservation Tillage Conference offered March 2-3 by The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.As farmers prepare for spring planting, much of their planning will focus on where and how to cut costs for 2016 without reducing net income, Reeder said.‘Corn University’“Many growers are tightening their belts because of tight budgets, low prices and not much money in the bank,” he said. “For a few years, grain farmers were making good money. But in 2015 grain prices fell sharply, with 2016 prices looking to stay low.”CTC will offer numerous presentations designed to help growers learn where to cut back while ensuring they have healthy soils, healthy water and hopefully a healthy bank account, Reeder said.The program includes a “Corn University” and “Soybean School” that will be offered during the annual conference, he said.Topics to be discussed during the Corn University March 2 include:• Corn yield forecasting.• New molecular methods for insect control.• Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium management highlights for corn.• Taking a second look at hybrid performance and technology.• Crop-effective and environment-responsible nutrient placement in strip-till and no-till corn.Topics to be discussed during the Soybean School March 3 include:• Ohio soybean limitation survey results.• Managing weeds in soybeans.• Fertility management.• Managing soybean insects.• The future of soybean breeding.• Top 10 ways to improve yield, without breaking the bank.The Corn University and Soybean School are just two of a total of eight concurrent sessions during the conference. More than 900 participants are expected to attend the event, which is organized by OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, with assistance from USDA and SWCDs.OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms of the college.The conference will offer the latest research, insight, tips and techniques on precision fertility, cover crops and manure, water management, technology and equipment, nutrient management, and advanced cover crops. It features some 60 presenters, including 25 CFAES researchers and Extension educators, as well as farmers and industry representatives.Certified Crop Adviser continuing education credits are available, with an emphasis on soil and water and nutrient management hours.Topics presented during the two Cover Crop sessions include:* Understanding the legal aspects of manure application.* On-Farm experiences with cover crops and manure.* Enhancing soil mycorrhizal fungi to retain nutrients.* Improving soil carbon for healthier soils.* Sustainable agriculture programs from Campbell Soup Co.The CTC conference will be held at the McIntosh Center of Ohio Northern University in Ada. The full schedule and registration information can be found at ctc.osu.edu. Participants may register by mail through Feb. 21 or online through Feb. 26 for $65 for one day or $85 for both days. Walk-in registration is $80 for one day or $105 for both days.Information is also available from county offices of OSU Extension.Other conference sponsors include the Ohio Corn Marketing Program, Ohio Soybean Council, Farm Science Review, John Deere, Ag Credit, Seed Consultants and the Ohio No-Till Council.last_img read more

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Top stories of 2016

Share Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Our web site keeps track of the stories that generate the most interest and at the end of the year we like to review the top stories to gain insight into how to better serve readers of our web and print content and our radio listeners. Plus, it is always fun to see which story comes out on top. To revisit all of these favorite web stories and videos in the last year, look for “2016 top stories of the year” on the right side of this web page. In addition to these top posts, other noteworthy drivers of web traffic in 2016 included the Ohio and Pro Farmer crop tours, the Ohio State Fair livestock show results, and Between the Rows. Weather challenges, the tough farm economy, all things draft horse, and farm technology also garnered major web traffic in the last 12 months. Here are the 10 most popular stories of 2016. 1. Noteworthy rule changes for showing livestock in 2016This story early in the year laid out some of the specifics of new livestock rules for Ohio and the reasoning behind the rule changes. Unfortunately there were five Ohio Department of Agriculture investigations regarding livestock exhibition in 2015, up from three in 2014. In response to these types of problems, it seems that rulebooks get a bit thicker every year with regard to showing livestock and there were some notable changes last year. State Veterinarian Tony Forshey outlined changes with regard to drenching, tagging in livestock, the use of adhesives and others. Beef specialist John Grimes outlined a nice response to the rules too. 2. Tough lessons from the 80s for a new generation of hardshipsA must-read for every farmer — Les Imboden is brutally honest about the tough lessons and realities on the farm through the 1980s. Farming offers a wonderful way of life, but many have learned the hard way that it must also run as a business. The 80s changed Les Imboden’s life and his advice can change your farming operation. 3. You’re teaching my daughter what in health class??A misguided health teacher tangled with the wrong farm broadcaster when showing the film “Food, Inc.” to a sixth grade health class that included the daughter of Ty Higgins. Ty politely, but very firmly, informed the teacher and school administration exactly what he thought and he found a fairly receptive new audience. 4. The livestock barn of the future“Monoslopes are the barn of the future,” said Francis L. Fluharty, research professor in The Ohio State University’s Department of Animal Sciences. “The design has the high side of the barn facing south or southeast, which allows the sun to reach almost all the way through the barn in the winter, having a warming effect on the cattle and keeping the bedding pack drier.”Then, in the summer, most of the barn is under shade and the slope to the roof creates constant airflow through the building to reduce heat stress. The open design of monoslope barns is also beneficial in keeping cows dry and better suited to handle the wind. 5. Piketon farmer’s ingenuity scores him a U.S. patentOne hot summer of dealing with the task of connecting his old 330 John Deere hay baler’s driveshaft to the PTO of his John Deere 6230 was quite enough for 80-year-old Roy Noel. As Noel was working on his rolling-hill farm in Pike County, he came up with a solution for this painstaking chore and a handy tool worthy of a U.S. patent. 6. An open letter to Wood County Fair youth exhibitorsIn response to activists that petitioned to end a 50-year tradition of the “Catch a Pig” event in Wood County, Ty Higgins wrote an open letter encouraging the youth exhibitors to represent agriculture well despite the off-color picket signs and questionable tactics employed by protesters. This is definitely worth a read for all youth exhibitors both in Wood County and around Ohio. 7. The race from Darke County to Rio: Former hog showman turns OlympianIn what was maybe my all-time favorite story interview, I sat down with runner Clayton Murphy just a few weeks before he left to compete in the 2016 Olympics. The former Darke County Fair and Ohio State Fair hog showman then went on to win a bronze medal. It was a real honor and privilege to meet this humble young man who represented Ohio agriculture in an impressive manner on the international stage. 8. If a farmer became President…Though we tried to mostly stay out of the historically ridiculous 2016 presidential campaigns, it would be impossible to cover the last year of news without some references. Ty Higgins’ take on how things could be different if a farmer resided in the White House was a very popular post leading up to Election Day. 9. Honey I shrunk the combineIt seems like every farm show across the U.S. was unveiling the biggest and best technology and machinery agriculture has to offer, but at some of these shows farmers and farm enthusiasts alike were getting a glimpse at something a little bit tinier. Kansas farmer Alan VanNahmen has built one-quarter and one-third scale replicas of a John Deere combine. The idea came to VanNahmen as he was working at Machinery Link, a company that started as a combine leasing business to help reduce farmers’ operating expenses.“The company I was working for was trying to shrink the cost of combines and harvesting, so I decided to create a quarter-scale John Deere combine to help get that message out,” VanNahmen said.The FarmBuddy combine was born. 10. The intrigue of a2 milkJoel Penhorwood cracked into the top 10 this year with his fascinating story on dairy farmer Ray Jackson in western Logan County who is looking to diversify his product with what may be a trend on the horizon for the industry — something called a2 milk.Regular cow’s milk is about 85% water. The rest consists of lactose, fat, proteins, and more. About 30% of the total protein in that assembly is made up of beta-casein. Two variants of this protein are found in cow’s milk, a1 and a2. Cows are genetically predisposed to produce milk with either a1 or a2 proteins, though a new trend has recently raised the eyebrows of dairy farmers looking to cows that can produce a2 without any a1 beta-casein for a potential new niche market. read more

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Exceeding the Energy Code

first_imgSTEP 8: EXCEEDING THE ENERGY CODE (IECC)Code: N1101.8 A code official or local jurisdiction is permitted to allow a national, state, orlocal green-building or energy-efficiency program to exceed the energy efficiency required by the IRC or IECC. A building approved in writing by such a program will be considered compliant.What it means to you: This update ensures that builders who use LEED, Energy Star, or a local green-building program may be able to comply with all energy-code provisions of the IRC and IECC. The above code provision allows a building official to deem the energy-efficient program as exceeding the energy efficiency required by the code. The value of this provision is that while the energy requirements of both the IRC and the IECC change, other programs initiated by cities, counties, and states sometimes do not—at least not at the same pace. Builders can disregard the energy requirements of the code only if the locality has approved the alternative program.The 2009 building codes reflect practices that not only increase energy efficiency, like air sealing measures and increased insulation, but also address sustainable building practices, like moisture control.Other segments of this series:Part 1: Air SealingPart 2: InsulationPart 3: LightingPart 4: Programmable ThermostatsPart 5: Insulating Mass WallsPart 6: Efficient WindowsPart 7: Insulating Mechanical PipesPart 8: Exceeding the Energy CodePart 9: Vapor Retarders 9 Steps to A Greener CodeNew homes built using the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) or International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) will be more energy efficient than ever. As a consequence, a builder’s world may become a bit more complex and, in some cases, a bit more expensive. last_img read more

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Depleted India team arrives in West Indies, Raina says team motivated

first_imgA depleted Indian cricket team, sans senior players Sachin Tendulkar and regular captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni, arrived in Port of Spain, Trinidad, for a limited-over series against the West Indies, starting on Saturday.Smartly dressed in a tee and trousers, the Indian players landed at around 20.30 hrs (local time) on Wednesday at the Piarco International Airport and were received by officials of Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Board (TTCB) and sponsors Digicel.The Suresh Raina-led Indian side looked tired and exhausted after their long flight from Mumbai via London and Barbados.Stand-in skipper Raina’s eyes were blood-shot for lack of sleep and a few team members looked dishevelled from the exertions of a long, trans-Atlantic flight.Even though he looked tired and sleepless, Raina exuded confidence that his young team will do whatever it takes to win the lone Twenty20 game and the fivematch ODI series against the Caribbeans.”It’s a young side. The players want to do well for the country and themselves. They are extremely motivated,” said Raina on his arrival.Vice-captain Harbhajan Singh too opined that the starless Indian team would not be short of motivation in the upcoming series, irrespective of their relentless cricket schedule.”These are young boys who are looking to build a career for themselves. I don’t think tiredness or fatigue would be a factor,” said the off-spinner.Team manager Amitabh Chowdhary said that irrespective of the long flight, the side would attend its practice sessions as scheduled.India will play a Twenty20 match in Trinidad (June 4) and five ODIs on June 6 (Trinidad), June 8 (Trinidad), June 11 (Antigua), June 13 (Antigua) and June 16 (Jamaica).advertisementThe One-day series would be followed by a three-match Test series in Jamaica (June 20-24), Barbados (June 28-July 2) and Dominica (July 6-10).RAIN MARS PRACTICERain in the last few days hampered the West Indies in their practice session at the Queen’s Park Oval, the venue of the first three limited overs matches against India starting on Saturday, and they had to sweat it out at the indoor facilities.As West Indies trooped in Queen’s Park Oval for an intense training session, they were disappointed to know that rains of last few days had left the practice pitches unfit to use.The squad was left with no option but to train at Bryan Davis indoor nets but batting coach Desmond Haynes wasn’t ready to come to terms with the situation at the venue which will host a Twenty20 International and the first two ODIs of the series.Haynes sought out 22-year-old Darren Bravo, who is seen as next Brian Lara in this part of the world but had not done well against off-spinners in his career, for a batting tutorial on the least damaged pitch with a little mat rolled over the surface.- With PTI inputslast_img read more

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England on the edge of series defeat as Australia tighten grip on the Ashes

first_imgAshes 2017-18 Sign up to the Spin – our weekly cricket round-up Read more Unsurprisingly the pitch looked a little livelier when the Australian bowlers took the field after resting up for the best part of two days. Mark Stoneman fell, caught behind, for his first single-figure score of the series in Hazlewood’s first over. Cook clipped two leg-side boundaries and looked sharp enough until a leading edge went back down the pitch, where an inspired Hazlewood dived to his right before completing a brilliant one-handed catch.Out came Root, steeling himself to regain the initiative. As ever he began busily, whereupon Steve Smith summoned Lyon on a pitch that has been no more helpful to spinners than an umbrella in a hurricane – incidentally it seems that umbrellas are the latest item to be banned from Australian cricket grounds. Lyon’s first ball was speculative, wide and on a good length, a nice sighter for the batsman, except that Root chose to drive it. The edge clipped the gloves and knee of the wicketkeeper before landing gently in the hands of a jubilant Smith at slip.That England avoided an immediate subsidence was down to James Vince and then a plucky partnership between the first-innings heroes, Dawid Malan and Jonny Bairstow. Vince batted in princely fashion with barely an error. Twelve boundaries fizzed from his bat in his 55 but then he was bowled by Starc. On this occasion Vince was blameless since he was the recipient of the ball of the series, which cut from leg to off as if delivered by Derek Underwood in his pomp but 25 mph quicker. There was absolutely no disgrace in this dismissal. Read more Share on Twitter Cricket Share via Email Australia cricket team match reports Support The Guardian The Ashes Australia sport … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you.center_img Share on Facebook A tempestuous Sunday in Perth ended with England on the brink of surrendering the Ashes. A fierce, winter wind blew all day, which had players digging into their cases for sweaters. The candlelight carols down by the river Swan were cancelled in the morning – there was certainly no chance of any candles staying alight and there were more serious concerns that the stage and the lights would be blown away.To the despair of England fans at the Waca the disruption to the cricket was surprisingly brief. Sometimes there was sun, sometimes showers and always that wind howling across the ground. Amid the gales Australia inexorably tightened their grip, declaring with a lead of 259 and then making clinical incursions into England’s batting like an expert surgeon. At the close the tourists were 132 for four, still 127 runs away from making Australia bat again.Already England’s experienced men were back in the pavilion with a pair of 14s, no more use to the team than they are in pontoon. Alastair Cook’s tour, despite all the toil – but no sweat – in the nets has yet to take off, while Joe Root’s Australian expedition took another turn for the worst. Of the four batsmen dismissed Root’s departure was the most exasperating.Perhaps the strain on the captain is telling, with the expedition on the brink of failure. In his eagerness to assert himself at the crease Root chased the first delivery bowled by Nathan Lyon in the innings – the widest he has bowled in the series – and he was caught behind. He may, like Cook four years ago, be appreciating how lonely a job his can be. Topics Share on Messenger England cricket team Thereafter Malan and Bairstow dug in impressively with few frills except when Malan took four authentic boundaries off an over from Pat Cummins. Despite the cracks appearing down the middle of the pitch – as is usually the case here – fluent strokeplay was still possible on this surface.Play was abandoned soon after 5pm when the heaviest shower blew over, with England hoping for more of the same on the fifth day.Oddly the fourth one began better than England could have hoped given that Australia started it on 549 for four. Mitchell Marsh was lbw to Jimmy Anderson’s second delivery; then Smith, after a cunning review, departed in the same way as England’s premier bowler conjured a little movement from the Prindiville stand end. The titans of Saturday were mortal after all.Then Starc was stranded mid-pitch and Australia had lost three wickets for 12 runs. They were still 158 runs ahead but the complexion of the game had changed. Perhaps the old ball was reversing a little, which might justify not taking a new ball for an over or two. But it is hard to explain why Root and, more pertinently, his two senior bowlers declined to take it once Tim Paine and Cummins had begun to settle.So here was a case of England’s two senior new-ball bowlers not wishing to bowl with a new ball. There was a risk attached: the hard and shiny new ball can fly. But there was also a potential reward: the new ball against lower-order batsmen might produce the three quick wickets required to keep Australia’s lead under 200. The old guard was not prepared to take that risk. Sometimes old-pro canniness can give way to negativity; sometimes Root may be required to challenge the wisdom of the seasoned duopoly.So the Australian pair were able to add 93 as England, with the soft old ball in their hands, settled for damage limitation rather than the pursuit of wickets. The decision to persist with the old ball was a declaration of non-intent.After lunch Cummins became the third lbw victim for Anderson and then Lyon holed out to his third ball. Anderson remains England’s best bowler but this must have been the least satisfying four-wicket haul of his career. From the depths of 561 for seven Australia were able to declare on 662 for nine. Share on WhatsApp Share on LinkedIn Share on Pinterest Since you’re here… Ashes 2017-18: Australia v England third Test, day four – as it happened Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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