Google shows how subsea cables can provide earthquake and tsunami warnings

first_imgFor several weeks the ocean floor was quiet, showing no SOP changes that would indicate an earthquake. Then, on January 28, 2020, it detected a magnitude 7.7  earthquake off of Jamaica. A plot of SOP over time showed a pronounced spike at a time stamp approximately five minutes after the earthquake occurred, correlating to the travel time of the seismic wave from Jamaica to the  cable, and the duration of the spike was about 10 minutes. Google’s global network of undersea cables makes it possible to share, search, send, and receive information around the world at the speed of light. These cables are built using optical fibers that carry data as pulses of light traveling at 204,190 kilometres per second. The pulsing light encounters distortions as it travels thousands of kilometres across the cable. Then, on March 28, a magnitude 4.5 earthquake occurred off the shore near Valparaiso, Chile, only 30 km away from one of Google cables at the closest point. The event produced a clear but short spike of SOP activity—the short duration was likely to due to a rapid decay in the vibration intensity along the cable for this relatively small event.  By analyzing the data, Dr. Zhan showed that not only can earthquakes be detected emanating from tectonic plates, but pressure changes in the ocean itself can also be detected, which could help predict tsunamis. Of course, this is just a first demonstration, not a working system, and much work remains to be done. First, scientists will need to better understand the deluge of complex data that will be generated by monitoring SOP. To create a robust earthquake monitoring system, researchers need advanced mathematics and data analytics, where advanced computing systems like Google Cloud can be instrumental. The technique relies on equipment that is present on the vast majority of the world’s existing fiber optic systems, so it is broadly applicable. There’s a long tradition of using optical fiber for sensing applications. But whereas most of these techniques are effective over distances of up to 100 km, Google has developed a technique that works over tens of thousands of kilometres. In the months following the Jamaica earthquake, the team also detected multiple moderate-size earthquakes, both at shorter and longer distances. center_img At the receiving end, the light pulses are detected, and the distortions are corrected by digital signal processing. One of the properties of light that is tracked as part of the optical transmission is the state of polarization (SOP). The SOP changes in response to mechanical disturbances along the cable and tracking these disturbances enables to detect seismic activity.    Google team shared the results with Dr. Zhongwen Zhan of the California Institute of Technology Seismological Laboratory, who confirmed the observations and provided additional insight into travel times of different types of seismic waves and the expected frequency ranges of SOP excursions.  In late 2019, Google began monitoring SOP on some of its global submarine cables. During the initial field trial, it observed that SOP was remarkably stable, even after the signal traversed 10,500 km. This approach is seen not as a replacement of dedicated seismic sensors but as a source of complementary information to enable early warnings for earthquakes and tsunamis. On March 22, 2020, there was a magnitude 6.1 earthquake on the East Pacific Rise. The team observed clear SOP activity with timing consistent with observations made at a seismic monitoring station in Tlapa, Mexico, which was located at a similar distance. “We’re excited by the early success of detecting seismic events with subsea cables, which can improve our ability to observe both the Earth’s structure and earthquake dynamics. But this is just the beginning,” Google team said. Google has shown how subsea fiber optic cables could be useful for earthquake and tsunami warning systems around the globe.  last_img read more

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Multi-tasker Shryock tops Lee County IMCA Frostbuster feature

first_imgKelly Shryock was the $1,000 IMCA Modified feature winner at Lee County Speedway’s Wednesday night Frostbuster. (Photo by John Vass)DONNELLSON, Iowa (April 11) – Kelly Shryock multi-tasked Wednesday night, mastering lapped traffic while outrunning Hunter Marriott in the IMCA Modified Frostbuster main event at Lee County Speedway.Shryock started fourth and led the last 21 of 25 circuits at Donnellson, taking the $1,000 checkers ahead of Marriott – up from 11th starting – and Cayden Carter.“I picked the smoothest lane and tried to be consistent,” Shryock said following his first win of the season and IMCA career 82nd. “I was lucky and had a good starting position. Hunter has been pretty fast and when he got to second it was ‘Oh boy, here we go,’ but I was able to hold him off.”Shryock ran the extreme high line going into the first turn and dropped down to the middle groove in the second set of turns, bringing Marriott along into traffic.“It’s fun to be able to negotiate through that stuff, knowing that you’ve got bogeys on your tail,” he said.Shryock was already on the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot. Jeff Aikey and Chad Holladay completed the top five.More than 120 cars saw action at Donnellson. Other opening night Frostbuster winners were Todd Reitzler in the IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, Shannon Anderson in the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks and Austin Howes in the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods.Reitzler raced from ninth starting to beat Damon Murty and John Oliver Jr. to the checkers. Anderson’s career 318th win in the division came in front of Eric Stanton and Leah Wroten.Howes led a trio of hard chargers across the stripe. Runner-up Jake McBirnie had started 10th, Austin Becerra went from 12th to third and defending national champion Tyler Soppe from 14th starting to fourth.Barry Taft was the Mach-1 Sport Compact victor.Frostbuster Week continues Thursday for the Modifieds, Stocks, Hobbies and Northern SportMods at Benton County Speedway. The gates open at Vinton at 5 p.m. and the grand­stand opens at 5:30 p.m. Hot laps are at 7 p.m. with rac­ing to follow.Frostbusters are April 13 at Marshalltown Speedway and April 14 at Boone Speedway.Feature ResultsModifieds – 1. Kelly Shryock; 2. Hunter Marriott; 3. Cayden Carter; 4. Jeff Aikey; 5. Chad Holladay; 6. Cory Wray; 7. Eric Barnes; 8. Todd Shute; 9. Ethan Dotson; 10. Clay Money; 11. Jacob Murray; 12. Joel Rust; 13. Kurt Kile; 14. Travis Perry; 15. Dan Menk; 16. T.J. Smith; 17. David Brown; 18. Kyle Brown; 19. Shawn Ritter; 20. Richie Gustin; 21. Troy Cordes; 22. Jeff Waterman; 23. Chris Zogg; 24. Carter VanDenBerg.Stock Cars – 1. Todd Reitzler; 2. Damon Murty; 3. John Oliver Jr.; 4. Tom Bowling Jr.; 5. Jason See; 6. Derrick Agee; 7. Dustin Griffiths; 8. Brian Mahlstedt; 9. Abe Huls; 10. Jay Schmidt; 11. Corey Strothman; 12. Jeremy Pundt; 13. Andrew Borchardt; 14. Jake Nelson; 15. Larry Karcz Jr.; 16. Ray Raker; 17.Cody Washburne; 18. J.J. Heinz; 19. Larry Parhen; 20. Nathan Wood; 21. Kody Scholpp; 22. Russell Damme Jr.; 23. Spencer Hopwood; 24. Cayden Carter.Hobby Stocks – 1. Shannon Anderson; 2. Eric Stanton; 3. Leah Wroten; 4. Eric Knutson; 5. David Rieks; 6. Matt Olson; 7. Mike Kincaid; 8. John Watson; 9. Seth Janssen; 10. Justin Wacha; 11. Brok Hopwood; 12. Jeremy Swanson; 13. Nathan Ballard; 14. Jeremy Purdy; 15. David Simpson; 16. Ricky Miller Jr.Northern SportMods – 1. Austin Howes; 2. Jake McBirnie; 3. Austin Becerra; 4. Tyler Soppe; 5. Arie Schouten; 6. Sam Wieben; 7. Daniel Fellows; 8. Brandon Dale; 9. Ethan Braaksma; 10. Brandon Setser; 11. Cory Rose; 12. Kevin Bethke; 13. Phillip Keller; 14. Kyle Keller; 15. Michael Carter; 16. Rick Barlow Jr.; 17. Brayton Carter; 18. Matt Webb; 19. Tory Mack; 20. Tony Johnson; 21. Blaine Webster; 22. Ryan King; 23. Jeffrey DeLonjay; 24. Jeff Frana.Sport Compacts – 1. Barry Taft; 2. Jake Benischek; 3. Darin Weisinger Jr.; 4. William Michel; 5. Brandon reu; 6. Luke Benischek; 7. John Gill; 8. Jason Ash; 9. David Prim; 10. Ashton Blain; 11. Mike Hornung Jr.; 12. Robert Sturms; 13. Matt Milligan; 14. Chuck Fullenkamp; 15. Ryan Havel; 16. Josh Barnes; 17. Cody Bowman; 18. Jason Breuklander; 19. Jeffrey DeLonjay; 20. Kimberly Abbott; 21. Aaron Berry; 22. Oliver Monson; 23. Jake Dietrich; 24. Rachel Kile.last_img read more

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Purple & Bold: LeBron on retirement: ‘We’re gonna play ’til we can’t walk no more’

first_img“As long as I feel great and as long as I can still play at a high level and mentally I’m sharp and I’m there and I’m giving everything to the game and nothing can distract me from what the main objective is, I’ll probably play this game,” he said. “When I physically can’t play or mentally I’m a little checked out or I’m not approaching the game like I’ve always done in my whole career since I picked up a basketball, then you can start looking at (the end) that way.”While James might not relate to Anthony’s deep consideration that his career might be over, he sympathized with his close friend, who he worked out with over the summer. When he and other NBA stars get together in the offseason, James said, the conversation mostly revolves around wine, family and cigars – not the game.Still, James could see Melo was hurting as he worked out on his own after getting cut by the Houston Rockets last year. At one point last season, James hoped that Anthony would catch on to the Lakers roster, a possibility that raised some eyebrows when the Lakers considered making a playoff push.“His name was brought up with us last year and I hoped that opportunity presented itself as well when we had our injuries,” James said. “I was hoping he was going to be a part of here and it didn’t happen for whatever reason. But I’m happy that he has an opportunity to go back and play the game that he loves to play and do it at this level.”For his own part, James has offered up that he’d like to play with his son, Bronny, who is currently a freshman on the Sierra Canyon High basketball team with Zaire Wade. But it’s hard to envision James coming to terms with aging in, say, the way that Vince Carter has. Once a superstar, always a superstar? Or could James become a role player who gracefully finds a way to contribute into his late 30s or even early 40s?That’s a question James isn’t willing to entertain at the moment. He balked at another question about how athletes come to terms with ending their careers. It’s not for guys like him and Tom Brady to ask themselves yet.“I have no idea,” he said. “I’m not at the end of my story.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Editor’s note: This is the Friday, Nov. 15 edition of the Purple & Bold Lakers newsletter. To receive the newsletter in your inbox, sign up here.One would assume, at some point, that LeBron James might start thinking about retirement like the rest of us.Turning 35 next month, James is one of the few left in the esteemed 2003 Draft class. Dwyane Wade is retired. Carmelo Anthony finally got a second chance with Portland after a year out of the NBA – and many thought he might not get back. LeBron played against several coaches he’s had during his career, including Ty Lue, Luke Walton and Jason Kidd.But if James is doing any internal debate about when he hangs up the sneakers for good, it’s going to stay internal. On Friday morning, a reporter asked – in the context of Melo’s return – if he had given much thought to his post-basketball life. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with Packers“Not really. Not the way I feel right now,” he said. “Me and Tom Brady are one in the same: We’re gonna play until we can’t walk no more.”It was a little bit of an overstatement (Brady is 42, in case you’re wondering), but James hardly jokes when it comes to measuring his own ability to stand up to time. And so far, he has delivered the goods in his 17th season – and helped cleared away any perception (if it existed) that he’s the “Washed King.”He’s averaging 24 points per game, which is his lowest scoring average since his rookie year, but c’mon, he’s got Anthony Davis. James is also doing something he’s never done before: Leading the league with 11.1 assists per game. He has 20 more assists this season than his nearest competitor, Luka Doncic. And Wednesday’s dominating performance against the Warriors (23 points and 12 assists in 26 minutes) is a reminder that James can turn on the afterburners, even without Davis.This is in part due to relentless training and recovery. James and trainer Mike Mancias recently appeared on the Nike Trained podcast, discussing James’ various methods of recovery, diet and sleep for how he stays at a near-MVP level while his contemporaries have slowly left the stage around him.But even James understands that it’s eventually a losing battle. And he’s done some visualizing of the criteria that will eventually send him out. UP NEXTIt’s a busy weekend for the Lakers, who have the Sacramento Kings on Friday and the Atlanta Hawks on Sunday. Luke Walton returns to Staples Center for the first time with Sacramento, who hired him the day after he and the Lakers parted ways.— Kyle GoonEditor’s note: Thanks for reading the Purple & Bold Lakers newsletter. To receive the newsletter in your inbox, sign up here.More readingThe latest on injuries – What to know about Avery Bradley, Anthony Davis, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope and Rajon Rondo going into Friday’s game.Living large – The Lakers aren’t afraid to be big in a league that goes small, and it’s helped them succeed.No need for AD – The Lakers didn’t need another star to lay a licking on the Warriors.Nothing Golden can stay – What it’s like when a dynasty collapses.Pro-load management? – Mirjam looked into how a fan might actually want a star to rest.Tales from the sideline – I enjoyed this podcast by Laker Film Room with team podcaster Aaron Larsuel with a look behind the scenes.Green room access – Since I wrote about Danny Green’s podcast last week, it wouldn’t be much for followup if I didn’t share the season’s first episode with Dwight Howard.last_img read more

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