COVID-19: Govt claims more than half of country at low risk of infection

first_img“Hospital availability has also increased, from 132 referral hospitals [three months ago] to 800 referral hospitals in all 34 provinces,” Wiku said.  The country increased its rate of testing between May and June, when 220 laboratories tested nearly 20,000 samples a day. At the beginning of the outbreak, there was only one laboratory testing less than 1,000 samples daily.Wiku further claimed that some regions had managed to contain the virus. As of Sunday, 38 cities or regencies in 19 provinces had recorded zero cases of COVID-19 in the last four weeks.However, 57 cities or regencies are categorized as red zones (high-risk areas), while 157 areas are orange zones (medium-risk). The number of red zones increased from 51 to 57 between June 14 and 21.“The local administrations are the key actors of reporting and mitigating COVID-19 in their jurisdictions,” said Dewi Nur Aisyah, an epidemiologist on the national task force’s team of experts.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo said he appreciated local leaders and regional task forces that managed to contain the virus.“With an integrated information system, we can roll out policies that are based on data and science,” he said.Topics : The government has claimed that almost 60 percent of the country is either at low risk of COVID-19 infection or has zero cases.According to the chief of the national COVID-19 task force expert staff, Wiku Adisasmito, 188 regions in Indonesia are classified as yellow zones (places where there is a low risk of infection), while 112 are green zones (regions where there are zero confirmed cases).He explained that the percentage of regions included in yellow or green zones had been consistently increasing, from 46.7 percent to 58.3 percent between May 31 and June 21, though the number decreased once to 44.3 percent on June 7. “Some businesses [in those regions] have reopened,” Wiku said in a virtual press briefing from the State Palace on Wednesday.He claimed that Indonesia’s economic and public health situation was otherwise “not really worse” compared to other countries thanks to the policies implemented by the government. Read also: Indonesia records new daily highs in cases during transition to ‘new normal’In the last three months, there was an increase in the number of hospitals that handed over reports of COVID-19 cases to the national task force, from 250 in the early days of the outbreak to 1,687 thus far.last_img read more

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Explainer: World Health Organization’s struggle for a global COVID-19 vaccine plan

first_imgThe World Health Organization (WHO) on Tuesday urged countries to join a global pact aimed at ensuring less wealthy countries have access to COVID-19 vaccines, warning about the risks from so-called “vaccine nationalism.” Here is a look at the WHO’s plan and the approaches by wealthier nations.What is the WHO’s vaccine program?The COVAX global vaccines facility is a program designed to pool funds from wealthier countries and nonprofits to develop a COVID-19 vaccine and distribute it equitably around the world. Its aim is to deliver 2 billion doses of effective, approved COVID-19 vaccines by the end of 2021. Governments including United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, and the European Union have spent tens of billions of dollars on deals with vaccine makers such as Pfizer Inc, Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca Plc and others. The United States alone has committed nearly $11 billion for development, testing, manufacture and stockpiling of hundreds of millions of doses.Russia and China are also working on vaccines and have already begun vaccinating some of their citizens.What kind of resources are being brought to bear?The ACT Accelerator is financed by a variety of nonprofits and governments. It is aiming to raise about $31 billion.So far, the COVAX facility has attracted interest from 92 poorer countries hoping for voluntary donations and 80 wealthier countries, a number little changed from a month ago, that would finance the scheme, according to the WHO.What is the WHO’s concern?The WHO has expressed concern that wealthier countries hoarding vaccines for their own citizens could impede efforts to end the pandemic.“We need to prevent vaccine nationalism,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during a Tuesday virtual briefing. “Sharing finite supplies strategically and globally is actually in each country’s national interest.”WHO leaders have said that developing a coordinated global distribution system for COVID-19 vaccines that prioritize those at greatest risk of getting sick, such as healthcare workers, would help curb the spread of coronavirus worldwide.  Topics :center_img The details of the program are still being hashed out ahead of an Aug. 31 deadline for nations to join. It is led by the WHO, along with the Gavi vaccine alliance, and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI).COVAX is part of a broader program, called the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, that works to ensure that vaccines, treatments, diagnostic tests and other healthcare resources are broadly available to combat the pandemic.What are wealthier nations doing?They have focused on securing vaccines for their own citizens, striking deals for the first doses even as data has yet to prove the vaccines to be effective.last_img read more

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NBA preview: Our guide to the 2017-18 season

first_imgCan Russell Westbrook, George and Anthony share the ball effectively with the Thunder? If so, is that team the real threat to the Warriors? And how are ball-dominant guards Chris Paul and James Harden going to function in the same backcourt in Houston?Los Angeles gets the All-Star Game again this season (with a new format no less), but will any Lakers or Clippers be on the Staples Center court for the main event?With Paul gone, oft-injured Blake Griffin is now the Clippers’ unquestioned leader, while the Lakers are handing their keys to rookie point guard Lonzo Ball and telling him to drive a young roster well enough to impress all those elite free agents-to-be that the future is bright.Danny Ainge put the Celtics back in contention last season, then spent the offseason remaking their roster. Coach Brad Stevens now has Kyrie Irving, Gordon Hayward and rookie Jayson Tatum at his disposal but little else he will recognize from a year ago. Gone are Isaiah Thomas, rugged defender Avery Bradley and Jae Crowder and eight other players from a team that won an East-leading 53 games.Are the Minnesota Timberwolves and Philadelphia 76ers ready to end their playoff droughts? Can the Knicks or Nets begin building a winner in hoops-hungry New York? Do Tony Parker and Manu Ginobli have enough left to help Kawhi Leonard and the Spurs reach another NBA Finals? Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Here are links to some content to get you ready for the season ahead, with an emphasis on the Lakers and Clippers.LAKERSLakers hope ‘little things’ will land them big stars next summerHeisler: Hope returns for Lakers, however brieflyBrook Lopez, one of few veterans on a young team, might be biggest kid of allMiller: Like you, Lakers weren’t sure what “Wish” on their jerseys meant, eitherLakers believe their defense is on the upswingLakers still getting comfortable with versatile Brook LopezJulius Randle faces uncertain future with the LakersBrandon Ingram ready to take lead, even if Lonzo Ball is the starMiller: Lonzo Ball Era begins and Laker Nation braces with anticipationBrook Lopez, one of few veterans on a young team, might be biggest kid of all‘One of the guys,’ Lonzo has Lakers teammates believing in him, futureLakers 2017-18 roster breakdownKey Lakers games to watch this seasonLakers 2017-18 regular-season scheduleCLIPPERSQ&A with Lawrence Frank, Clippers president of basketball operationsBlake Griffin says Clippers are deeper, more versatile teamClippers coach Doc Rivers doesn’t care about your preseason predictionsClippers guard Austin Rivers: ‘We will be a playoff team this year’Why the Clippers want Blake Griffin to change his gameClippers know Milos Teodosic can pass, but they want him hitting shots, tooBlake Griffin says Clippers’ goal is simply to qualify for playoffsClippers looking to run and run and run some more this seasonClippers’ Wesley Johnson benefits from an offseason confidence boostClippers won’t have a guard controversy this season, Doc Rivers saysWhicker: Milos Teodosic could be a unique visitor for ClippersHow Clippers, Bowen came to tie the knot on TV dealClippers 2017-18 roster breakdownKey Clippers games to watch this seasonClippers 2017-18 regular-season scheduleAROUND THE LEAGUEWarriors’ run – improbable, absurd, revolutionary – deserves reflectionAdam Silver and MJ: 1 man’s NBA garbage is another man’s beautyLeBron James vs. Kyrie Irving the latest entry in NBA rivalries‘Truth’ be told, retired Clipper Paul Pierce wants transition from NBA to ESPN to be authenticNBA tries a new format for 2018 All-Star Game at Staples CenterWestern Conference team previews and projected finishEastern Conference team previews and projected finishcenter_img From the high-profile players who changed zip codes to a fleet of promising rookies, there are new faces in new places going into the 2017-18 NBA season.Despite all those remade rosters and new constellations of stars joining forces, the possibility of an unprecedented fourth consecutive NBA Finals rematch looms large, even likely.Whether or not we get Golden State vs. Cleveland again in June, the league doesn’t lack for storylines that will entertain us along the way.The Western Conference has been stronger and deeper than the East for years, yet somehow that became more pronounced this summer. Paul George (Indiana to Oklahoma City), Carmelo Anthony (New York to OKC), Jimmy Butler (Chicago to Minnesota) and Paul Millsap (Atlanta to Denver) all relocated to the stacked side of the league.last_img read more

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