Program helps veterans adapt to life in college

first_imgIt was November 20, 2010, the last football game of the season at Harvard Stadium. The outside linebacker for Yale University, Jesse Reising, was about to leave college with his life planned out — following graduation, Reising was slated to enter the Marine Corps. In a matter of seconds, his plans would be derailed.With just 10 minutes left in the final quarter, Reising saw the Harvard running back head toward him. He distinctly remembers that his shoulder pads were too low. Before he knew it, he was lying on the 27-yard line, barely conscious. The impact had detached two nerves in his neck, and paralyzed his right arm above the elbow, shattering his hopes of joining the Marines.Reising soon found another way to serve his country, through helping veterans assimilate into college. He connected with veteran and fellow Yale graduate Christopher Howell to create the Warrior-Scholar Project, which came to USC last summer.Partnering with 11 top-tier colleges such as Yale and Vassar College, the Warrior-Scholar Project was established as a skill bridge between enlisted service to college.Even though the government provides monetary support for veterans in the G.I. Bill, it is not clear how many of them graduate from college. The Warrior-Scholar Project recognizes that receiving a degree requires not only the opportunity, but also  the ability to adjust to academia. For veterans that enlisted out of high school, the gap between institutions makes it difficult for them to transition back into school, especially college.“Over 40 percent of post-GI dollars are finding their way to private, for-profit college industries,” said Sid Ellington, the executive director for the Warrior-Scholar Project. “Most of these people are really smart, very capable. They just aren’t prepared to take full advantage of the opportunities of higher education.”The program works like an academic boot camp every summer, lasting from one to two weeks. It focuses on two types of skills: tactical and strategic.Tactical skills include things like breaking apart a syllabus, time management and taking notes efficiently. Strategic skills, also known by the scholars as “engi-reading,” are taught by professors at the University.The professors teach about liberty and democracy from the perspectives of their own disciplines, such as international relations, political science, law, philosophy or English, making analytical reading and writing easier for veterans to identity with. Veterans of all different demographics are selected.“There were some people still going through medical treatment. There were veterans that were retired 15 or more years. The ones that were enrolled in college were from both four-year and community college,” said Tina Fleming, a tutor at the USC Warrior-Scholar partnership.The program director of the Warrior-Scholar Project at USC is Jesse Ramirez, a junior majoring in political science. Originally from Chicago, Ramirez moved to Los Angeles to be closer to his brother, who was stationed in San Diego with the Marines. He attended Santa Monica College for two years before transferring to USC. At the University, he started working for the Veterans Resource Center and was invited by his supervisor to attend a veteran issues meeting, where the opportunity for the Warrior-Scholar presented itself“A veteran myself, I’ve always worked with other veterans. so it’s a very close community,” Ramirez said. “I resonate with all of their struggles — I was in a position where I needed help and that help wasn’t available.”The program at USC was carried out for the first time last summer with 14 students and lasted for about a week. In the morning they were taught by USC faculty, then spent the rest of the day in critical thinking and critical writing courses interspersed with talks about the college application process, visits to the library, and other aspects of university life. According to Fleming, with this rigor came some difficulties.“The material that they read is really heavy, and the immersion process for students definitely isn’t easy,” Fleming said. “There are moments when people break down or feel like they just want to walk away because it’s really intense, and they might not get too much sleep. But in the end, the majority of people are satisfied, and the program really promoted USC by having the students come to campus and learn through USC professors.”The idea for the program coming to campus was first proposed by the chairman of the Board of Trustees, John Mork, who heard about it from a veteran who works for him. Mork asked Provost Michael Quick to consider supporting it, and eventually USC became the first West Coast school to join the program. Mark Todd, vice provost and manager of the WSP branch at USC, said that he finds the most rewarding part of the program to be the reciprocation for the service veterans have provided us through education.“What is most rewarding to me, [is]that we offer the best of what USC has, to help those who have sacrificed so much to serve us,” Todd said. “They come away believing that they can really succeed at a university like USC. It is powerful.”last_img read more

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Recipe: Jerk Smoked Turkey

first_img24 to 303.5 to 4 Jerk turkey recipe for thanksgiving Caribbean-Americans jerk their turkey for the traditional Thanksgiving dinner.Most Caribbean-Americans in Florida has adapted to the traditional American celebration of Thanksgiving that occurs on the last Thursday of November annually. What they have discovered as they join their American neighbors in celebrating Thanksgiving is that not having a turkey for the customary Thanksgiving dinner is like having Christmas dinner in the Caribbean without roast chicken and/or baked ham.However, Caribbean Americans prefer having a Caribbean touch at their Thanksgiving dinner. In order to create this touch Jimmie Jackson, the 2013 winner of the Publix Cook-off at the Grace Jamaican Jerk Festival, provided this recipe for Jerk Smoked Turkey.Jimmie says he uses a brine for the jerk smoked turkey ( He says this is optional but it does make turkey tastier). The turkey gets some of its savory and rich flavors from this brine. He, however, cautions the cooks to be easy on the salt because they will be required to add JJC jerk rub on the big bird.Ingredients for the jerk smoked turkey:1 Dressed Turkey (approx 12 t0 30 lbs)2 quarts cold water2 quarts vegetable stock or water( but less flavor) 3/4 cup sugar¾ cup kosher or coarse salt2 tbsp all spice berries2 dried bay leaves1/2 dried bunch of fresh thyme5 oz JJC  hot dry jerk rubPreparation: in a large pot combine vegetable stock, sugar, salt, allspice berries, bay leaves and thyme. Simmer over medium heat for about 12 to 15 minutes until all sugar and salt has dissolved. Remove from heat and allow it to cool down. Add cold water to mixture. Place turkey in plastic container or Plastic trash bag and place in a bucket. Once you brine your turkey over night or up to 32 hours remove turkey for brine and place on a pan and allow it to rest. Pour all excess liquid away and pat turkey dry with paper towels. Next rub your turkey completely with JJC hot jerk rub and now the cook is ready to smoke or roast the turkey..Jimmie says Turkeys can be unpredictable but there are some important factors determining cooking time. These factors include: the thickness of the breast, how well the bird is defrosted and how long it was left at room temperature.Below is a rough guide for how long it will take to get the temperature in the deepest part of the breast to 160* and the thigh to 170* ( Please have a good thermometer!!! Make sure it’s calibrated). Please note that the turkey can also be roasted if the cook doesn’t have a good smoker. 18 to 243 to3.5 12 to 142 to 2.5center_img 14 to 182.5 to3 PoundsHours  at 325*last_img read more

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Ogilvy, Stenson reach final match

first_img“All golf at the end of the day is hitting it on the fairway and making a lot of putts,” Ogilvy said after a 3-and-2 semifinal victory over Chad Campbell. “If you do that in any format, you’re going to do well.” Ogilvy will face Sweden’s Henrik Stenson in today’s 36-hole final in Marana, Ariz., the first time in the nine-year event an American hasn’t reached the title match. The streak is alive at the Accenture Match Play Championship. And it belongs to Geoff Ogilvy. With so much attention on Tiger Woods’ bid for an eighth straight PGA Tour victory, Ogilvy streaked into the championship match Saturday by winning his 10th and 11th in a row in a strong defense of his title. The U.S. Open champion has been so dominant that he hasn’t played the 18th hole since a practice round Tuesday. Stenson played bogey-free in a 3-and-2 victory over Trevor Immelman to reach the final. PGA: Fred Funk overcame back problems to shoot a 6-under 64 for a two-stroke lead over Argentina’s Jose Coceres after the third round of the Mayakoba Golf Classic, the first PGA Tour event in Mexico. The 50-year-old Funk is trying to join Craig Stadler as the only players to win on the regular tour after winning a Champions Tour event. Funk’s Champions victory came a month ago in Hawaii, where he won the Turtle Bay Championship. Funk, who opened with a 62, had a 15-under 195 total. Coceres shot a 65. LPGA: Stacy Prammanasudh shot a 4-under 68 to hold off Jee Young Lee by a stroke and complete a wire-to-wire victory at the Fields Open in Kapolei, Hawaii. center_img The 27-year-old Prammanasudh had five birdies and sealed her second LPGA Tour title by two-putting for par from 20 feet on No. 18 to finish at 14-under 202. Lee closed with a bogey-free 68. Champions: Allen Doyle shot a 5-under 67 in windy conditions to take a one-stroke lead over Bobby Wadkins and Champions Tour newcomer Mark O’Meara after the second round of The ACE Group Classic in Naples, Fla. Doyle, an 11-time winner on the 50-and-over tour, had a 12-under 132 total on the Quail West Golf and Country Club course. O’Meara, making his second Champions Tour start, shot a 68, and Wadkins followed his opening 64 with a 69. Nationwide/Australasian: American Nicholas Thompson won the New Zealand PGA today for his first Nationwide Tour title, beating Canada’s David Morland IV with a par on the first hole of a playoff. Thompson, the former Georgia Tech star who played the PGA Tour last season, and Morland closed with 4-under 68s to finish at 8-under 280 on the Clearwater Resort course. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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