Asamoah Gyan crowned as 2014 best foreign player in Asia

first_imgGhana striker Asamoah Gyan has received his award as the Best Foreign Player in Asia for the year 2014.The Black Stars captain was presented with his award before Saturday’s training session with his UAE club Al Ain.Coach of Al Ain Zlatko Dalic with his backroom staff and the rest of the players gathered to celebrate with their lethal striker before the morning’s workout.The Asian Confederation (AFC) announced Gyan as the Best Foreign player late last month following his heroics in the 2014 Champions League where he emerged top scorer with 12 goals – two more than closest rival Al Hilal’s Nasser Al-Shamrani.Asamoah Gyan with his Al Ain teammates celebrating his feat Gyan’s goals were however not enough as his side crashed out of the competition at the semi-final stage to Saudi Arabian club Al Hilal.His goals and overall performance in the Champions League plus his ever-improving record in the UAE made him the obvious choice.The former Sunderland man has won consecutive Goal King awards ever since making the unpopular move to the UAE in 2011.He is statistically, the best African player in 2014 – a record that his earned him his second nomination for the CAF African Player of the Year award which will be revealed early next year in Lagos.last_img read more

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Palos Verdes Estates man pleads not guilty in Dodger Stadium attack

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error A Palos Verdes Estates man pleaded not guilty today to assaulting a man in a parking lot at Dodger Stadium after a Dodgers-Mets game last October.Michael Rae Papayans, 27, is charged with a felony count of assault by means likely to produce great bodily injury, with an allegation that he caused great bodily injury.Papayans is accused of punching a 50-year-old man in the head, knocking him unconscious after the Oct. 9 game. As the man fell to the ground, he struck his head on the pavement, causing him to sustain serious head injuries, prosecutors said.Papayans’ mother allegedly kicked the man in the back while he was on the ground, according to the District Attorney’s Office. Prosecutors referred a potential case against her to the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office to determine if a misdemeanor case should be filed. A spokesman for the City Attorney’s Office could not be reached for immediate comment on whether city prosecutors are still reviewing the potential case against the woman, whose name was not disclosed. She allegedly yelled epithets at a group of four people — one of whom was wearing Mets attire — as they headed to their car in Lot L after the game, in which the Mets defeated the Dodgers 3-1. Her son allegedly joined in the verbal dispute with the group before punching the man, who was not in Mets attire, according to the District Attorney’s Office.Papayans was arrested Feb. 11 by the Los Angeles Police Department’s Robbery-Homicide Division, then released the next day on a $30,000 bond.Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Upinder Kalra ordered Papayans to return to court April 27, when a date is scheduled to be set for a hearing to determine if there is enough evidence to require him to stand trial.center_img If convicted as charged, he could face up to seven years in state prison.Four days after the attack, Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck appealed for the public’s assistance in tracking down the perpetrators, saying, “We believe it is a son and mother who are responsible for this assault.” The attack was reminiscent of the March 31, 2011, assault on San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow in a parking lot at Dodger Stadium. Stow was involved in a post-game confrontation in the parking lot and fell to the ground, cracking his skull on the pavement.The former paramedic and father of two eventually regained consciousness, but suffered permanent brain damage.Two men pleaded guilty to attacking Stow and were sentenced to state prison in a case handled by Deputy District Attorney Michele Hanisee, who is also assigned to the Papayans case.The Stow attack led to questions about the adequacy of security at Dodger Stadium. He sued the team and was awarded $18 million.last_img read more

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Brad Stewart to headline Fort St. John Fivestar Fight League card

first_imgOwner and promoter of Fivestar Fight League Justin Donally says a new commission has made it possible for Fort St. John to have a fight card and is thrilled to be putting on the show.“We’ve been touring western Canada, B.C., Alberta, and the North West Territories for the last year and a half putting on pretty big fight cards,” he says. “Now we’re coming home finally with a new commission in place that has allowed us to do so. We’ve got the venue locked up and we couldn’t be more excited to finally bring a fight card home to Fort St. John, the first one ever.”In the main event of the evening Brad Stewart of Fort St. John will be putting the Fivestar Middleweight title against Cody Krahn. Krahn is the seventh ranked middleweight in Canada after a big win in the cage this past weekend.- Advertisement -“Brad Stewart, a local home town guy he’s going to headline the card. He’s ranked sixth in Canada according to Fight Matrix. He’s excited, he’s been fighting all over Canada and he’s excited to come home and fight at home,” Donally states. “He’s going to defend the title against Cody Krahn who just won last Saturday night against Clay Davidson. Cody’s just jumped up to number seven in Canada so we’ve got the number six and seven fighters going at it for the Fivestar Fight League Middleweight title.”Fivestar cards of the past have had championship calibre fights and fighters with UFC experience as well. Donally plans to put on a show that will be the best line up of fights that Fivestar has produced for home town MMA fans.“Anybody that’s been to any of our cards can expect twice the fight card they’ve ever seen. We’re coming home and this is the reason I started this fight promotion was to eventually do a show here and do it big,” he explains. “We’re talking huge names coming in we’ve got Caleb Starnes, Tim Hauge, to ex UFC fighters working their way back to the top.”Advertisement Donally says it’s a great feeling to put on a local show not only on a personal level, but to give a chance to local fighters to perform in front of familiar faces.“It means everything. This fight league was started with big intentions of doing big things in the Peace Region and we’ve done that. We’ve been to Dawson Creek, Prince George, Grande Prairie, Tumbler Ridge, but Fort St. John is where we really wanted to do this card. With commissioning we weren’t able to do it until now. This is why we started this fight league and finally bringing this fight card home to support our local athletes.”Tickets are expected to go on sale in the next couple of weeks for “Homecoming” to be held at the Fort St. John Curling Club.last_img read more

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US mental health institute puts champion of basic science at the helm

first_img NIH Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Gordon will take the helm of NIMH, a part of the National Institutes of Health, in September, a full year after former Director Thomas Insel surprised the community with his decision to join Google’s life sciences team. Insel was known for his emphasis on the biology underling psychiatric illness—an approach many expect Gordon to embrace. “I think this very much continues in that tradition,” says Eric Morrow, a developmental neurobiologist and psychiatrist at Brown University. “The field has to bridge some pretty big gaps,” he says, “So it’s fantastic to have somebody who sort of understands broadly how to go from gene to behavior.”On Insel’s watch, the institute launched a new framework for diagnosing psychiatric illness, called the research domain criteria (RDOC), which scraps traditional disease categories based on clinical symptoms to search for new categories grounded in brain biology. Not being a clinical researcher, Gordon says he hasn’t paid much attention to the RDOC yet, but sees diagnosis as a critical issue, and plans to evaluate whether new diagnostic approaches, including RDOC, are effective.“I want to learn for myself before I decide where I’d like to see things move forward,” he told ScienceInsider. “Of course, in reality, being NIMH director is like herding a bunch of really brilliant cats, so I think the field moves forward without a whole lot of direction sometimes, and that’s probably a good thing.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Joshua Gordon Email Up to now, Joshua Gordon has split his career between working with patients with mental illness and mice designed to mimic that illness. But this fall, the neuroscientist and psychiatrist will take control of the $1.5 billion U.S. National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Bethesda, Maryland, the agency announced yesterday. Gordon, who treats patients at the New York State Psychiatric Institute in New York City, is best known for developing mouse models that mirror aspects of anxiety and schizophrenia. His lab at Columbia University Medical Center has recreated cognitive deficits seen in schizophrenia by blocking the activity of neurons in mouse brains, for example, and developed a mouse model of the genetic disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, which predisposes humans to psychosis. “Josh is certainly coming from a basic science side,” says Carrie Bearden, a neuroscientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who studies people with the syndrome. “He really cares about taking the findings in the animal models and looking how it’s really convergent with patient findings.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

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