Australia’s facing a serious affordable housing shortfall

first_img MORE: The New South Wales government sold off several public housing properties four years ago, including this one at Millers Point at The Rocks which fetched $2.56m. Public housing at Rosemeadow in the south west of Sydney. Picture: AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts.Australia is facing a massive housing shortfall that won’t be met unless governments ramp up affordable home building tenfold, a new report warns.The figures, contained in the latest report by the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) out Thursday, warned the country would need an estimated 727,300 additional social housing dwellings in the next two decades – with the current shortfall sitting at 433,000 homes.Report co-author Dr Laurence Troy from UNSW Sydney found that the number of public housing units built by Australian governments had shrunk significantly from a level between 8,000 to 14,000 new public housing units a year 40 years ago to minimal construction rates now. Good news for first home buyers Meet the couple that bought an entire town Dr Troy said lack of affordable housing was a serious problem for many Australian families.“A renewed social housing program should boost output to a level similar to that seen in the early post-war period when state governments were building about one in seven new homes in Australia.”The report which saw researchers from RMIT and UNSW Sydney also explore the best options to meet public housing shortfalls urged government to move towards capital grant funding as it was the most cost effective option. “Australian governments have been recently funding only around 3,000 new social housing units per year, we estimate that output of about 15,000 is needed just to stop the existing shortfall from getting even bigger. To fix the current problem as well, over a 20 year period, calls for a ten-fold increase.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agocenter_img “The lifetime cost is $1.6 billion less, or a 24 per cent direct saving to the public purse, compared with a commercially-financed program supported through revenue subsidy,” Dr Troy said.The research found that more than a fifth of all housebuilding in places like the UK, Finland, France and Australia were by “housing providers with a social purpose”. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:09Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:09 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy rental affordability is a problem02:09 Harder to rent in Brisbane than Sydney The report estimates Australia needs an estimated 727,300 additional social housing dwellings in the next two decades. Picture: Jodie Richter. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON TWITTERlast_img read more

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MAJOR TOURISM CONFERENCE IN DONEGAL TODAY

first_imgThe second annual ‘Connecting the Wild Atlantic Way’ marketing conference hosted by Donegal County Council in association with Donegal Tourism Ltd takes place today.The event, which will be held in Letterkenny, the National Tidy Towns Winner for 2015, is almost booked out.This year’s Conference, at the Clanree Hotel, is themed around ‘Your Business, Developing Networks and Reaching Customers’.During the conference businesses will learn how to use simple and cost effective marketing techniques and tips on topics such as bundling and internationalisation from a panel of guest speakers ranging from tour operators to travel bloggers to leading travel experts. SpeakersSpeakers lined up for the event include Brian Harte of Tourism Ireland, Deirdre McGlone of Harvey’s Point, Online Strategist Darragh Doyle, Kathrin Chambers, Digital Manager at Fáilte Ireland and Stephen Cotter, General Manager at CIE Tours International.The final speaker for the day will be acclaimed travel writer Fionn Davenport of the Irish Times.County Manager Seamus NeelyCEO of Donegal County Council and Chairman of Donegal Tourism Seamus Neely said ‘This conference will provide a valuable resource to all members of the tourism trade in Donegal. “As the Wild Atlantic Way and social media are ever evolving it’s important for tourism businesses to keep on top of these trends and maximise opportunities for attracting new visitors to the county”.MAJOR TOURISM CONFERENCE IN DONEGAL TODAY was last modified: October 8th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:conferenceletterkennyWild Atlantic Waylast_img read more

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Migration Program under fire

first_imgA new report warns that the Gillard government’s Skilled Migration Program is based on incorrect assumptions, is out-of-date and requires major reform to implement its objectives. The report produced by the Centre for Population and Urban Research (CPUR) at Monash University coincides with the row over the granting of temporary visas to 1700 foreign workers as part of an Enterprise Migration Agreement (EMA) approved by the government for Hancock Prospecting’s Roy Hill iron ore mine in WA. The Roy Hill mine is expected to be the first of dozens of projects for which EMAs are approved, allowing Australian companies to import skilled and semi-skilled foreign labour on temporary 457 visas. Following union pressure last week the Gillard government announced a ‘jobs board’ to give Australian workers information about jobs available in the mining sector. With the Skilled Migration Program in the limelight, the CPUR’s latest report entitled ‘The 2012-13 immigration program: record numbers, city-bound’ sends a message that the government’s planning on migration matters is seriously awry. The Program, set to increase the total number of migrants in 2012-13 to 190,000, has the purported aim of delivering skilled migrants to the resources industries, but the reality, says the CPUR, is that outside EMAs, none of the skilled permanent entry or temporary visa categories target such migrants. Founding Director of the CPUR Bob Birrell – one of the authors of the report told Neos Kosmos: “Employers can sponsor migrants regardless of the industry, occupation or location of their workplace. “The result is that just over half of the migrants currently being visaed are locating in Sydney and Melbourne, rather than in the resource industry states.” “Domestic Australian workers can expect increased competition for jobs from migrants at a time when there is little growth in employment in either Sydney or Melbourne,” said Mr Birrell. The Labor Government plans to increase the permanent entry migration program to 204,000 (including humanitarian migrants) in 2012-13, a decision which is consistent with the Government’s stance since it came to power in late 2007. The CPUR report concludes that the Program is based on two assumptions, one of which is fundamentally incorrect. “One is that the minerals boom will require a huge increase in skilled workers who must be drawn in part from migration. The other is that, as a consequence of the resources boom, the rest of the Australian economy will surge, generating a nation-wide shortage of skilled workers. The first of these assumptions is correct, but not the second,” says the report. “DIAC’s skilled visas are structured on the assumption that there are nation-wide shortages of skilled workers and that employers everywhere should be allowed to sponsor 457s and permanent migrants in any skilled occupation, industry or location in Australia.” As a result, says Bob Birrell “most of the migrants in the record-high intake planned will end up in East coast cities, particularly Sydney and Melbourne and will add to the stresses of Australian workers struggling to find work in a weak labour market. “The Government’s Migration Program is out-of-date. It is now part of the problem. The new circumstances require a smaller and better targeted intake, which delivers scarce skills to the industries and locations which really need them.” Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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