Program helps veterans adapt to life in college

first_imgIt was November 20, 2010, the last football game of the season at Harvard Stadium. The outside linebacker for Yale University, Jesse Reising, was about to leave college with his life planned out — following graduation, Reising was slated to enter the Marine Corps. In a matter of seconds, his plans would be derailed.With just 10 minutes left in the final quarter, Reising saw the Harvard running back head toward him. He distinctly remembers that his shoulder pads were too low. Before he knew it, he was lying on the 27-yard line, barely conscious. The impact had detached two nerves in his neck, and paralyzed his right arm above the elbow, shattering his hopes of joining the Marines.Reising soon found another way to serve his country, through helping veterans assimilate into college. He connected with veteran and fellow Yale graduate Christopher Howell to create the Warrior-Scholar Project, which came to USC last summer.Partnering with 11 top-tier colleges such as Yale and Vassar College, the Warrior-Scholar Project was established as a skill bridge between enlisted service to college.Even though the government provides monetary support for veterans in the G.I. Bill, it is not clear how many of them graduate from college. The Warrior-Scholar Project recognizes that receiving a degree requires not only the opportunity, but also  the ability to adjust to academia. For veterans that enlisted out of high school, the gap between institutions makes it difficult for them to transition back into school, especially college.“Over 40 percent of post-GI dollars are finding their way to private, for-profit college industries,” said Sid Ellington, the executive director for the Warrior-Scholar Project. “Most of these people are really smart, very capable. They just aren’t prepared to take full advantage of the opportunities of higher education.”The program works like an academic boot camp every summer, lasting from one to two weeks. It focuses on two types of skills: tactical and strategic.Tactical skills include things like breaking apart a syllabus, time management and taking notes efficiently. Strategic skills, also known by the scholars as “engi-reading,” are taught by professors at the University.The professors teach about liberty and democracy from the perspectives of their own disciplines, such as international relations, political science, law, philosophy or English, making analytical reading and writing easier for veterans to identity with. Veterans of all different demographics are selected.“There were some people still going through medical treatment. There were veterans that were retired 15 or more years. The ones that were enrolled in college were from both four-year and community college,” said Tina Fleming, a tutor at the USC Warrior-Scholar partnership.The program director of the Warrior-Scholar Project at USC is Jesse Ramirez, a junior majoring in political science. Originally from Chicago, Ramirez moved to Los Angeles to be closer to his brother, who was stationed in San Diego with the Marines. He attended Santa Monica College for two years before transferring to USC. At the University, he started working for the Veterans Resource Center and was invited by his supervisor to attend a veteran issues meeting, where the opportunity for the Warrior-Scholar presented itself“A veteran myself, I’ve always worked with other veterans. so it’s a very close community,” Ramirez said. “I resonate with all of their struggles — I was in a position where I needed help and that help wasn’t available.”The program at USC was carried out for the first time last summer with 14 students and lasted for about a week. In the morning they were taught by USC faculty, then spent the rest of the day in critical thinking and critical writing courses interspersed with talks about the college application process, visits to the library, and other aspects of university life. According to Fleming, with this rigor came some difficulties.“The material that they read is really heavy, and the immersion process for students definitely isn’t easy,” Fleming said. “There are moments when people break down or feel like they just want to walk away because it’s really intense, and they might not get too much sleep. But in the end, the majority of people are satisfied, and the program really promoted USC by having the students come to campus and learn through USC professors.”The idea for the program coming to campus was first proposed by the chairman of the Board of Trustees, John Mork, who heard about it from a veteran who works for him. Mork asked Provost Michael Quick to consider supporting it, and eventually USC became the first West Coast school to join the program. Mark Todd, vice provost and manager of the WSP branch at USC, said that he finds the most rewarding part of the program to be the reciprocation for the service veterans have provided us through education.“What is most rewarding to me, [is]that we offer the best of what USC has, to help those who have sacrificed so much to serve us,” Todd said. “They come away believing that they can really succeed at a university like USC. It is powerful.”last_img read more

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No surprise – Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw will make ninth Opening Day start

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “It just means I’m old, I guess,” Kershaw joked. “You don’t ever want to make light of the situation. It’s very cool. The cliché is it’s just another game and it is. But I guess Opening Day means a lot, symbolizes a lot of things. I’m excited about it. It’ll be cool.”The major-league record for consecutive Opening Day starts is held by Hall of Famer Jack Morris, who did it with three teams (the Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays and Minnesota Twins). The longest stretch of consecutive Opening Day starts with one team is 12 by another Hall of Famer, Robin Roberts, who did it with the Philadelphia Phillies.“To be with the same team that long, with the Dodgers a team with such a long list of great starting pitchers, to be associated with them is kind of special,” Kershaw said.Kershaw has a 1.05 ERA (six earned runs over 51-2/3 innings) with 59 strikeouts and eight walks in his eight previous Opening Day starts. The Dodgers won the first seven but lost 1-0 to the Giants on Opening Day last year.MANNY MONEYWhen the news broke Tuesday morning that Manny Machado had agreed to a 10-year, $300 million deal with the San Diego Padres, the Dodgers were just taking the field for the first full-squad workout of the spring. Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Hernandez and Taylor are right-handed hitters. Muncy is the Dodgers’ only left-handed option at the position. Moving him there against right-handed pitching would free up first base for Cody Bellinger (expected to play more in right field this year) and is “a possibility,” Roberts acknowledged Tuesday.“We still have time to hone in on that,” Roberts said. “And things can change as they always do. Right now, he’s going to take some grounders there. But a lot of his work is going to be at first base.”BUEHLER’S DAYDodgers right-hander Walker Buehler is the only one of the team’s starting pitchers who hasn’t thrown a bullpen session during camp. Roberts said the team is “slow-playing” him after a 177-inning workload last season.Buehler is tentatively scheduled to throw his first bullpen session on Wednesday.“But if I don’t, nobody freak out,” he warned reporters Tuesday.center_img GLENDALE, Ariz. — It is the least surprising news of Dodgers spring training every year for nine years now.Dodgers manager Dave Roberts was asked to name his Opening Day starter on Tuesday.“Clayton Kershaw,” Roberts said. “Does that surprise you?”It shouldn’t surprise anyone. The starting assignment on March 28 at Dodger Stadium against the Arizona Diamondbacks will be Kershaw’s ninth consecutive Opening Day start, extending his franchise record. “It’s good for Manny. It’s good for the Padres,” Roberts said. “So we’re going to see a lot more of Manny this year.”That Machado and Bryce Harper were both unsigned so deep into February had many bemoaning the state of the free-agent market. Many players went on record with their feeling that changes were needed in the system when talented free agents were not getting paid.Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman said he always felt that narrative was “overstated.”“Internally, we expected him to get arguably the highest free-agent contract ever. I guess free agent-wise it’s A-Rod’s $252 million and he beat it and it’s fitting for a guy with his talent,” Friedman said.“I do think there’s some challenges that we need to work out as an industry. But there was a lot of noise and chatter trying to incite things with things like saying there are 100 free agents (unsigned). There aren’t 100 major-league free agents. Saying guys were getting frozen out – clearly, that’s not the case. The rhythm of a negotiation can play out in different ways. Obviously, this one took a little longer. But ultimately he got a very strong contract – as he should.”2B OR NOT 2BDuring Tuesday’s first full-squad workout, Max Muncy did some work at second base with Kiké Hernandez and Chris Taylor. Roberts said Muncy would continue to work there some during the spring and also get some action at second base during spring games.Related Articles Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco last_img read more

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