April 1, 2005 News and Notes

first_imgApril 1, 2005 News and Notes April 1, 2005 News & Notes News and Notes Jonathan R. Friedland of Jonathan R. Friedland, P.A., in Miami was inducted as president of the Dade County Trial Lawyers Association. Michael Andrew Haggard of Haggard, Parks, Haggard & Lewis in Coral Gables served as guest speaker at a Dade County Bar Association seminar and spoke on the topic of, “Damages in Record Verdicts — Compensatory Damages and Punitive Damages.” Additionally, Haggard served as guest speaker at the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers’ fall convention on advanced trial skills where he spoke on the topic of closing arguments. Thomas A. Dye of Carlton Fields in Tampa spoke at the American Intellectual Property Law Association Mid-Winter Institute in Lake Buena Vista. Eric A. Gordon of Arnstein & Lehr in Boca Raton has published an article in the South Palm Beach County Bar Association’s winter issue of The South County Advocate. The article is titled, “How to Get Sued in Business Without Really Trying: Avoiding the Common Pitfalls Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.” Additionally, Gordon presented a seminar titled, “You’re Hired! How to Legally and Artfully Find and Qualify Applicants and Grow Your Company in 2005.” Jack A. Weiss of Fowler White Boggs Banker in St. Petersburg was elected to the board of directors of The Suncoast Tiger Bay Club. R. Terry Rigsby of Carlton Fields in Tampa was named vice chair of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. Bruce C. Crawford of Crawford, Owen & Hines in St. Petersburg was named chair of the Pinellas Association for Retarded Children. Paul Steven Singerman and Thomas O. Wells of Berger Singerman in Miami were featured speakers at the Northern Trust Annual Bankers’ Sales Conference. Their topic was, “Asset Planning for Physicians and the Defensive Rabbi Trust Loan.” William W. Corry of Tallahassee received the 2004 Trial Lawyer of the Year Award from the Tallahassee Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates.Legal Services of Greater Miami honored John Little, Barbara Lanshe, and Lashan Fagan. Little was honored for 20 years of service. Lanshe was honored for 15 years of service. Fagan received the Alfred Feinberg Memorial Award for her aggressive advocacy on behalf of the low income community. Toni L. Wortherly of Jacksonville started a publishing company, Artistic Esquire Publishing, LLC and published her first book, Pray While You’re Prey. Steven Jaffe of Aronovitz Trial Lawyers in Miami was named to the executive board of the Broward County Trial Lawyers. Cynthia Crofoot Rignanese was recognized by the ABA for “Outstanding Community Service During National Health Care Decisions Week.” Christina McKinnon of the Law Office of Christina A. McKinnon was named the “Newcomer of the Year” by the Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr., Bar Association in Miami. Morrie I. Levine of Hollywood was elected chair of the recently formed Gold Coast Region B’nai B’rith Youth Organization Adult Commission. Levine was also installed as vice-president of membership for B’nai B’rith Justice Unit #5207. Richard M. Benrubi of Liggio, Benrubi & Williams was elected treasurer of the 2005 Palm Beach County Trial Lawyers Association. Michael G. Whelan of Ogletree Deakins presented, “The Dark Side v. The Force” at the Florida Public Employer Labor Relations Association’s 31st Annual Training Conference. Julie A. Horstkamp of Kirk-Pinkerton was appointed chair for the Sarasota Realtor Attorney Joint Committee of the Sarasota Association of Realtors/Sarasota County Bar Association for a term of one year. Richard Doran of Ausley & McMullen P.A. in Tallahassee co-presented about the unique ethical obligations and challenges faced by a state attorney general at the winter meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General in Ft. Lauderdale. J.B. Harris of Motley Rice addressed the Trial Lawyers Marketing Roundtable in Palm Springs, CA, about marketing opportunities in emerging areas of liability, including tax resolution fraud, port crane accidents, vehicle defects, and Vioxx litigation. H. Steven Vogel was the featured speaker at a continuing education program for the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountant’s and also at Florida International University, the lecture was titled, “Selected Topics in Accounting Malpractice.” Kevin E. Packman of Nelson & Levine in North Miami Beach spoke at the Aventura Roundtable Luncheon hosted by Northern Trust Bank. Packman spoke on, “The Florida Homestead Exemption.” A. Brian Phillips of Ruden McClosky in Orlando presented at the annual Louisiana State Bar Association Retreat. Phillips presentation was titled, “The Rigors of the Interdisciplinary Practice.” Karen Plunkett of Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed in Orlando was elected to the board of directors for the Southeast Legal Marketing Association. Pamela Beckham of Beckham & Beckham in Miami was elected to serve a three-year term on the Council of ABA Trial, Tort, and Insurance Practice section. Jason Gonzalez of Ausley & McMullen in Tallahassee was appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush to a four- year term on the First District Court of Appeal Judicial Nominating Commission. David C. Prather of Lytal, Reiter, Clark, Fountain & Williams in West Palm Beach was elected president of the Palm Beach County Trial Lawyers Association for 2005. Michael S. Bender of Robert Kaye & Associates in Ft. Lauderdale was elected president of the Southeast Florida Chapter of Community Association Institute. Coralee G. Penabad of Meland, Russin, Hellinger & Budwick in Miami will speak at a one day Lorman seminar on the subject of bankruptcy in Florida.last_img read more

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LGBTQ Latino voters ‘show up and show out’ for 2020 election

first_img– Advertisement – According to the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law, 21% of LGBTQ people are not registered to vote, 22% of registered LGBTQ voters are Latino, and 13% are Black. Familia TQLM says these numbers indicate there is a lot of work to be done when it comes to reaching trans and queer Latino communities.Familia TQLM Campaign and Organizing Director Úmi Vera told Prism that the work the organization is doing is “unique.” Familia TQLM uses direct action tactics in advocating for the abolition of ICE. As state violence ramped up under the Trump administration, Vera said the organization decided to launch Vota Jota instead of standing on the sidelines for the 2020 presidential election.- Advertisement – “I’m the state director for a civic engagement organization, but I’m also a drag performer so everything I do is with this queer lens. For me, drag has always been political and drag is another organizing tool that I can successfully use to reach young voters,” Arevalo said. “I can’t vote, but that doesn’t mean I don’t have a role to play in this election.” Of increasing concern to organizers is the voter suppression that LGBTQ people of color may face at the polls this year—especially if their identification doesn’t match their gender identity. In this election, there are 35 states that have laws requesting or requiring voters to show some form of identification at the polls. Arizona has one of the strictest laws in the nation. This is why Poder Latinx has focused heavily on know-your-rights trainings.“There are layers to being a LGBTQ voter. It’s not always as simple as showing up at your polling place. This is why we want to make sure that LGBTQ people understand how to navigate this very unjust system,” Arevalo said. This is also a concern for Siembra NC. The organization is best known for its advocacy on behalf of Latino immigrants in North Carolina and for its organizing against anti-immigrant sheriffs, but the group’s new Queer Caucus aims to turn North Carolina into a place of power for queer Latino community members. Cris Batista is a member of Siembra NC’s Queer Caucus and as part of the Vota Jota campaign, she and other members have focused on voter registration and voter education, especially as it relates to the intimidation Spanish speakers may face at the polls. North Carolina is a purple state where 28% of the region’s 890,000 Latino residents are eligible to vote. Batista told Prism there is little outreach in these communities and in rural areas like Alamance County, there is an “outright anti-Latine atmosphere.” Voting as a Latino person in a hostile area gets more complicated if a person presents as queer, Batista said.“We are working hard to make people feel safe if they are speaking Spanish at the polls and are queer presenting,” Batista said. “The other goal is to really support our undocumented queer community and to let them know that we understand voting is a privilege they don’t have, and we are going to use this privilege to vote with them in mind as we fight for a better future.” QLatinx Executive Director Christopher Cuevas told Prism that in the rare instances that campaigns seek to engage Latino voters, a “blanket identity gets wrapped around the community,” one that erases LGBTQ people, Afro-Latino populations, and other groups. “We’re not a monolith. We’re very diverse—that includes our cultural practices, ethnicities, the languages we speak, and the issues that matter to us,” Cuevas said. “Latinx voters are the largest voting minority in the U.S. We have a lot of untapped power, and trying to hispander to us isn’t going to work. It’s going to take more than talking about immigration. Health care, housing, basic income, the lack of these things is killing our communities.” In Florida, QLatinx has focused on engaging Latino communities through literature drops, door-knocking campaigns, phonebanks, and text message campaigns. It’s “painstaking work,” the executive director told Prism, and so are the inroads the organization is trying to build with national organizations that focus on civic engagement. The goal, Cuevas said, is to get these organizations to go beyond “rainbow narratives” and begin to advocate more widely for criminal justice reform, access to reproductive health care, and to shift their understanding of immigration as a fundamental LGBTQ issue.The Vota Jota organizers who spoke to Prism all reported feeling uneasy headed into the presidential election, especially in light of the Supreme Court being stacked with President Donald Trump’s appointees and swirling concerns about a potential coup. Even if former Vice President Joe Biden wins the election, Cuevas said the work cannot stop. “I’m thinking a lot about where all of this momentum will go after the election. Like AOC said, there’s no going back to brunch if Biden is elected. We can maybe get some takeout, but there is no going back to ‘normal,’” Cuevas said. “Biden and Harris are not going to be our saviors. They may stop the bleeding, but this country has a lot to fix and we have to continue mobilizing our communities. We need to show up and show out—not just on Election Day, but every day.”  Tina Vasquez is a senior reporter for Prism. She covers gender justice, workers’ rights, and immigration. Follow her on Twitter @TheTinaVasquez. Prism is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet that centers the people, places and issues currently underreported by our national media. Through our original reporting, analysis, and commentary, we challenge dominant, toxic narratives perpetuated by the mainstream press and work to build a full and accurate record of what’s happening in our democracy. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. This includes the Arizona chapter of Poder Latinx, North Carolina’s Siembra NC, and Florida’s QLatinx, which formed after the Pulse Nightclub massacre that took the lives of 49 people, most of whom were members of the queer Latino community. The strategies for engaging voters have varied significantly in each of these battleground states, but all seek to speak directly to LGBTQ communities. Poder Latinx has historically focused on civic engagement, but this year the organization partnered with ArizonaDrag.com as part of the Vota Jota campaign. What emerged was the Drag Voter Squad, a group of Arizona-based drag performers working in coalition to produce voter education materials. As part of these efforts, Poder Latinx has also organized webinars, know-your-rights toolkits, streaming debate parties, and phonebanking events the organization called “drag-a-thons.” The Arizona state director for Poder Latinx Adonias Arevalo is a queer and undocumented drag performer. In fact, Arevalo was the first Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient to compete in the Miss Gay America drag pageant. – Advertisement – “Our ultimate goal is to empower trans and queer immigrant folks. We want them to know how to register to vote and how to have conversations about the importance of voting with their loved ones who are able to vote,” Vera said. “The way I see it, we are integrating electoral strategy into our radical abolitionist politics.” The Vota Jota campaign does come with a list of demands: universal basic income; universal health care for all; housing; abolishing Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the police; and ending the criminalization of trans-queer workers, including sex workers, drag performers, day laborers, and service and retail industry workers, among others. “An incredible amount of people are not eligible to vote in the Latinx community because they have been disenfranchised through the criminal justice system, and our people are disenfranchised because of their immigration status, which leaves millions of our parents, family members, and beloved queer and trans siblings unable to vote,” Vera said. “Organizing around this election is just another strategy in our toolbox, and it is allowing us to strengthen our movement by building this campaign with queer and trans organizations and organizations that do civic engagement work.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

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