Voters should back community park

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion After the December 2016 vote of the Shenendehowa school board to sell the surplus 34-acre parkland site off Moe Road to a developer, I was so discouraged. Low and behold, a group of activist citizens joined up with the Friends of Clifton Park Open Space and forced a referendum to submit this proposal to the voters.In rejecting the sale with over 70 percent of the voters unified in opposition, a clear message was sent to the school board for a “do-over.” Fortunately, the school board and the town were able to quickly put together a working team to negotiate the sale to the town of Clifton Park for a fair price of $1.1 million, and this new proposal will be the subject of a voter referendum on Dec. 5.My family urges yours to show up at Gowana Middle School on Dec. 5 and lend your yes vote to this critically important community initiative. I can think of no better way to start the holiday season with joy than to be among the strong supporters of this new central community park.Beth BergmanClifton ParkMore from The Daily Gazette:High-risk COVID exposure reported in Clifton ParkEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationGame 7: Shenendehowa grad and Braves rookie Ian Anderson gets start with World Series spot on the li…Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

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State officials want to see more mental health providers in rural areas

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) is launching a program to help attract mental healthcare providers to rural areas of the state where more services are needed.The program will provide an incentive for psychiatrists, alcohol and substance use counselors and practitioners in related disciplines to practice in a specific, federally designated Indiana region experiencing high numbers of opioid deaths. The counties included are Blackford, Dearborn, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Randolph, Switzerland, Union and Wayne. The program will be administered by the ISDH Division of Chronic Disease, Primary Care and Rural Health.“Attacking the drug crisis and helping people achieve recovery is a key pillar of Governor Holcomb’s agenda,” said Jim McClelland, Indiana executive director for Drug Prevention, Treatment and Enforcement. “This program will help bring more qualified medical professionals to rural Indiana communities and expand access to quality treatment for individuals with substance use disorder.”The project will make grants for professional loan repayments to qualifying providers in mental health and addiction-related disciplines first, followed by primary care physicians, who are also in short supply. The plan calls for 30 awards for each year of the four-year grant period. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will match the $300,000 ISDH is investing in the program for a total repayment pool of $600,000. An advisory committee, with the Family and Social Services Administration’s Division of Mental Health and Addiction and the Indiana Hospital Association as partners, will be formed to help with project development and grant awards by March. Applications are available online at https://www.in.gov/isdh/28090.htm.“Access to treatment is a critical component of our effort to reduce the burden of the opioid epidemic,” said ISDH Chronic Disease Director Ann Alley. “This program will help save lives by increasing access to mental health services and removing barriers to recovery.”According to HRSA, 46 of Indiana’s 48 rural counties don’t have enough mental healthcare providers. ISDH data show 42 of those counties had at least one death attributed to opioids in 2016, while seven of them had the highest number of opioid-related deaths in the state. Many of those same counties or their neighbors are on HRSA’s list of the top 5 percent most vulnerable for opioid use by state.last_img read more

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