Women poorer, men lonelier after divorce – study

first_imgThe Age (Australia) 24 July 2012WOMEN’S household incomes suffer more than men’s after divorce, but it takes men longer to recover emotionally, a study has found. The joint research, led by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, also highlights the significant impact divorce has on the financial assets of divorcees, which leads to many requiring greater government support in later life. The research – to be presented at the institute’s conference in Melbourne later this week – shows the household income after divorce declined for women, but not for men. In fact, while women’s household income dropped significantly, particularly in the first year after divorce, males’ income continued to rise. While the research showed some women were able to return to their pre-divorce income after six years through re-partnering, increased labour force participation and government benefits, this was not the case for divorced women with dependent children, who found it more difficult to combine paid work with family responsibilities.… The study – which also looked at the emotional wellbeing of divorcees – revealed that men reported greater feelings of isolation and loneliness than women, even up to six years after divorce. After two years of divorce, 24 per cent of men said they felt isolated, compared with 12 per cent of women. After six years, more men (19 per cent) than women (12 per cent) still reported feelings of isolation. Meanwhile, 35 per cent of men reported feeling ”very lonely” two years after divorce, compared with 25 per cent of women and after six years, 26 per cent of men still reported loneliness compared with 20 per cent of womenhttp://www.theage.com.au/national/women-poorer-men-lonelier-after-divorce-20120723-22kpd.htmllast_img read more

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Bigger forces amass grad student debt

first_imgFailed attempts at policy reform have led America to reach its tipping point. Too many ideas and too little time has caused the American people to solely rely on theory rather than applied practice, and millennials are set up to face the worst set of ramifications.Last month, the Center for American Progress released a study that found 20 universities to be responsible for the a fifth of all graduate school debt — with USC listed as No. 5, with students having amassed $460 million in graduate student loan debt.The exorbitant amount of borrowed money has contributed to the question many students, faculty, parents and bystanders have: Is USC irresponsible for steadily increasing tuition, and if so, why? But a deeper understanding of the interplay between federal and privatized loans and university tuition reveal a flawed system of increased demand and disproportionate tuition rates.For hundreds of years, America has prided itself on the concept of the American Dream. But with constant partisan divide stopping the effective execution of plans, Americans are no longer reaping success after years of hard work and are becoming less incentivized to do more with the American Dream out of reach.In the midst of the forthcoming presidential election, many candidates have promised policy reform for debt-free college programs by insinuating that Gen Y’ers will no longer be burdened by high college tuition. This is sadly false. In reality, doling out hollow promises for free education without feasible plans and with limited federal funding only allows the cycle of increased student debt to persist. And while this issue continues, millennials are precluded from fully contributing to American markets.College debt came under fire last year when Andrew Rossi released the documentary Ivory Tower,  explaining the businesslike nature of colleges. Though nothing has changed since, recently released staff reports from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York can help explain why both colleges and students are so caught up in the never-ending cycle of rising tuition and higher student debt.Over the past century, USC has steadily raised the cost of both undergraduate and graduate tuition, but much of the rhetoric behind this steady increase has to do with an interlinked relationship between higher tuition costs and increased loan demands.As explained in the Federal Reserve reports, higher tuition costs increase loan demand, but loan supply also affects tuition costs. This is can be explained through the pass-through effect, in which colleges adjust to the economic circumstance by counteracting increased costs and the increased availability of loans by raising tuition.“We find that institutions more exposed to changes in the subsidized federal loan program increased their tuition disproportionately around these policy changes, with a sizable pass-through effect on tuition of about 65 percent,” the June staff report stated.The more readily available loans are, the more college will cost and the more likely institutions are to increase tuition disproportionately. The report identifies a positive correlation between higher tuition and available student credit. The study finds that though it appears student loans would benefit students, they actually are detrimental because they create a ripple effect in incentivizing colleges to raise tuition repeatedly. The study also explains that Pell Grants specifically seem to have driven tuition higher because Pell Grants don’t require as much payment as other loans.The rhetoric and analytical data that the staff reports from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York may explain why students at USC and other colleges in the nation are struggling to pay tuition. The system is the law of supply and demand in reverse: Too much access to borrowed money equals higher tuition rates and less student enrollment.It isn’t really colleges that are responsible or the greater availability of loans. It’s an overall flawed approach to gearing millennials toward better jobs. Colleges and USC should not falter in these failed cycles of increasing student tuition. In an effort to help the millennials and the economy, universities should consider decreasing tuition so students are not trapped in the cycle of borrowed debt.last_img read more

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Shaw sees Ball as Badgers’ biggest threat

first_imgDavid Shaw has led Stanford to a record of 22-4 in his two years as head coach, winning consecutive Pac-12 Coach of the Year awards.[/media-credit]LOS ANGELES – When asked about his most pressing concern two days ahead of the Rose Bowl, Stanford head coach David Shaw needed no time to gather his thoughts and formulate a response. The biggest concern was Montee Ball, the star senior running back who will do battle with the third-best rushing defense in college football in Tuesday’s Rose Bowl.“We watched so much film, and I have so much respect for what he’s done at Wisconsin the last few years,” Shaw said at a press conference Sunday morning. “We’ve always looked at their film and how they run the ball, and the different things that they do. And you always see no matter what they run, he’s so patient, he’s got great vision, great balance.”Shaw added that Ball’s career mirrors that of another accomplished player lining up opposite No. 28 – Cardinal tailback Stepfan Taylor, who rushed 1,442 yards in his senior campaign. The two seniors both anchor their respective offenses with a physical style that invites contact from defenders, creating a matchup Shaw described as “strength against strength.”Taylor and Ball’s performance in The Granddaddy of Them All is magnified by the fact that both Stanford and Wisconsin have inexperienced quarterbacks starting under center. Cardinal freshman quarterback Kevin Hogan didn’t grab the reigns of the offense until the final four games of the season but proceeded to win each one, all the victories coming against ranked opponents (Oregon State, Oregon and UCLA twice).Hogan has countered his three interceptions in the five games where he has seen significant time on the field with 964 yards and eight touchdowns. Shaw said his young quarterback has shown tremendous growth since preseason training camp.“His athletic ability is something you can’t teach,” Shaw, in his second season as Stanford’s head coach, said. “When he gets out in space and makes a guy miss or breaks a tackle, that’s such a plus.“When you have a quarterback that you don’t have to call the perfect play for and he can still make plays when nobody’s open, he can run for 15 yards. When nobody’s open, he can buy time in the backfield until a guy can get open.”The Cardinal’s athletic 6-foot-4 quarterback has proven himself a dangerous threat with his own legs, collecting 145 rushing yards and a pair of touchdowns since assuming the starting role.Starting opposite Hogan will be Wisconsin’s Curt Phillips, who took over the starting role in place of the injured Joel Stave Nov. 10, the same day Hogan made his first career start.The Badgers’ fifth-year senior has not been called upon to lead the offense through the air, never crossing the 200-yard mark in a single game and throwing for 457 yards total in those four games. When he does elect to throw downfield, he will have to keep a watchful eye on the Cardinal’s freshman phenom in cornerback Alex Carter.A four-star recruit out of Ashburn, Va., Carter has started the last seven games for Stanford, forcing three fumbles and logging 39 tackles on the year.“They go through the initial testing, and he had combine numbers for a 17-year-old freshman, NFL combine numbers – 40-inch vertical, 10-foot-4-inch broad jump, he’s running in the 4.4 range,” Shaw said. “Just an explosive, physical athlete, very strong.”Carter will likely defend Wisconsin’s top receiving threat in Jared Abbrederis, a critical test for a cornerback preparing to step onto the biggest stage of his young career.Shaw praises ‘The Godfather’The Wisconsin football team has a new nickname for Barry Alvarez, and it’s fair to say Shaw is a vocal supporter of it. Players have now taken to calling the Badgers’ interim head coach – who will be looking to improve his Rose Bowl record to 4-0 New Year’s Day – “The Godfather.”Shaw worked alongside Bill Callahan, Wisconsin’s offensive line coach under Alvarez from 1990-94, for five years with the NFL’s Oakland Raiders and Philadelphia Eagles.“I think it’s awesome,” Shaw said of Alvarez’s latest nickname. “I think that’s a huge sign of respect, I have that respect for him. I have for years since the first time I heard his name since he took over the Wisconsin program, since [I] went to the Philadelphia Eagles and met Bill Callahan.“Bill Callahan told me I can’t tell you how many stories about Barry Alvarez, and building character in that program, building toughness in that program, how they recruited, how they played.”last_img read more

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