Surrounded by nature & reflected in it

first_img 17The “Fishbowl” at Currier offers a place to watch television, and, for Mara and friend, it is a place to perch. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 12One of the youngest residents of Currier is Mara Cavallaro. Her parents, Nadejda Marques (right) and Jim Cavallaro, are Currier’s House Masters. Her friend Autumn Galindo (left) holds the other end of the jump rope. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 2In 1972, full coeducational dormitories were instituted at Harvard — pictured here are the men and women of Currier House in a yearbook from the 1970s. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 6Because of the difficulty of pronouncing his first name, security guard Yohannes Tewolde is often called “Your Highness.” Here he shares a laugh with students Peter Davis ’12 (center) and Alexander Ramek ’12. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerStaff Photo Rose Lincoln/Harvard University News Office 4Yohannes Tewolde, the current and beloved night security guard at Currier, walks past the house entrance. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Audrey Bruce Currier House opened in 1970, named after a Radcliffe alumna who had died in a plane crash. The architects, Harrison and Abramovitz, surveyed students about their desires for housing, and so pioneered small clusters of dorm units, each with upstairs bedrooms and a downstairs living room. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Residents post ideas for a greener Currier on a board in the dining hall. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 25Currier House revelers are easily identified at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 26Currier’s finest and wettest, Alyssa Devlin ’11 (left) and Allan Bradley ’11, approach a dorm in the Yard to welcome new House members at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 7Says Yohannes Tewolde, “I hope I’m making a difference in their lives, encouraging them if they’re down. I tell them they’re doing a good job, and I pray for them. Sometimes I tell them to take a nap and get some rest. They tell me I’m like a mom or a dad.” He is pictured here with Suzanna Bobadilla ’13 (right), who waits for the bus. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 29Currier resident Tiffany Fereydouni is congratulated with a hug. Katherine C. Cohen/Harvard Staff Photographer 19Two days a week Mara gets a bike ride to ballet by Currier resident Lindsey Brinton ’12. Mara usually reads a book to and from the studio. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Devon Newhouse ’13, the “Eco Rep” for Currier House, proves that trash can indeed be treasure: She hosts a swap for clothing — and whatever else — in the House’s laundry room. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 21Living in the only undergraduate House at Harvard named solely for a woman are block mates Rachel Bervell (from left), Nadia Farjood, Jeanette Schnierle, Jordan Ashwood, Sarah Mumanachit, Karina Herrera, and Melissa Naidoo. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 22Students wait in the foyer for the shuttle as snow falls at Currier House. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 28Diplomas are awarded at Currier House. Katherine C. Cohen/Harvard Staff Photographercenter_img 14Autumn Galindo (left) waits for her ride after visiting her friend, Currier resident Mara Cavallaro, who is holding the door for a student. Mara’s mother, House Master Nadejda Marques (center), looks on. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 15Mara (left) and friend Autumn play air hockey while Currier students play ping-pong in the lower level lounge. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 23A Currier resident displays more than the conventional poster at Housing Day. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 11As part of an effort to make the House “greener,” Building Manager Manny Casillas replaced all incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent in all custodial, mechanical, and storage closets. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 20Lindsey Brinton ’12 teaches Mara to play the piano during their babysitting sessions at Currier House, where both reside. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Yohannes Tewolde goofs around with Currier resident Richard Maopolski (right). Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Some days, Mara’s bedroom is her gymnasium. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 5Patricia Machado (right) works in Dining Services at Currier House and is welcomed to work by Yohannes Tewolde. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer From the oversize windows in the room called “the Fishbowl” at Currier House, you can see lush green grass and blossoming trees on alternate sloping hillsides. Students who live in Currier, on Radcliffe Quad, have a longer walk to classes than their River House classmates but live more quietly, surrounded by nature. Since 1970, when Currier opened, the great outdoors have been invited inside. More recently, following the lead of the original architects, current Currier residents have “greened” the way they live, introducing environmental initiatives. Low-flow toilets and dishware drives are part of life in this House they call home. Living in a place nicknamed the “Tree House” comes with responsibility, which Currier’s staff and residents have embraced. 24When the various Houses extend invitations for living assignments to freshmen, Mark Piana ’11 (center, bare chest), and Kevin Chen ’12 (right) whoop it up for Currier House. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 3This black and white photograph of the Master’s living room at Currier House was published in a booklet distributed at the House dedication in 1971. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 27Currier resident Danielle Gram co-founded the nonprofit Kids for Peace, an organization that “works with children ages 3 to 10 to empower them to lead the way to a more tolerant, nonviolent society.” She was featured in Harvard’s special Commencement issue. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 16Mara plays the piano in the dance studio at Currier. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Young Currier resident Mara Cavallaro, on the school bus, is unhappy because her father, House Master Jim Cavallaro, is leaving on a work-related trip. He signs “I love you” to her. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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Unhidden figures

first_imgIf there’s one thing LaNell Williams wants women of color interested in studying physics at top institutions to know, it’s this: You can do this.Williams is a Ph.D. student in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences working in the lab of Wagner Family Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Physics Vinothan Manoharan, and just the third African American woman to pursue a doctorate in physics at Harvard. When she graduates she will join a cohort of fewer than 100 African American women who have received doctorates in the field since 1973.“When I tried to apply to Harvard, despite everything I had — a 3.93 GPA and a National Science Foundation fellowship — I was told I was reaching too high. And if you asked any black woman in this field, especially those of us who are at places like Harvard, they’ll tell you similar stories,” Williams said. “The biggest thing Harvard and places like it miss when it comes to recruiting is that they’re not encouraging those of us who are qualified, those of us who are ready, those of us who are able, to come to these places.”To help change the situation, Williams co-founded the Women+ of Color Project as a student at Wesleyan University to support women of color in STEM fields. The group ran a three-day workshop at Harvard recently for 20 African American, Latinx, and Native American women interested in pursuing a career in physics, astronomy, and related fields. Attendees were selected from a pool of candidates who had applied or been nominated, and the goal of the event was to help them access the resources they need to apply to and succeed in graduate school.“I’m bringing these students here now, because I want to tell them, ‘You are good enough,’” she said. “They have the grades; they have the scores; they have the pedigree. What’s keeping them from applying — and this is what I’m focused on — is the conversations and the resources.”In her keynote speech, Nia Imara, a John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, urged the women to bring their unique perspectives to the fields they study.,“I don’t love the fact that women and minorities are underrepresented in science, because I know we have knowledge to contribute just like everyone else,” said Imara, who studies how stars are born in the Milky Way and other galaxies. “When I go to a conference and I look out in the audience, I can’t help but notice who is missing, and I can’t help but think this is a loss for the scientific community.“Most of you are forging a new path, and that takes courage,” she continued. “I know it hasn’t been easy. As a female student and a female student of color, you have had to face obstacles others haven’t. You may have been discouraged or excluded, and I know that often you’ve never been properly acknowledged or apologized to. But not in spite of, but because of your experiences, you have a unique way of seeing the world. You have a unique set of qualities that will make you an asset whether you decide to go to grad school or otherwise.”As part of a session designed to walk students through the process of applying to graduate school, Director of Graduate Studies for FAS Science and Co-Director of Graduate Studies for Physics Jacob Barandes shared tips on what admissions committees look for in students.,“If you’re here, it’s probably because you love learning,” he said. “So apply. Please don’t count yourself out. You may have heard from people that you’re not strong enough. Forget about that. You are much stronger than you think you are, so please apply, and let the admission committees decide.”Other workshop events included deep dives into how to write a graduate school essay, feedback from Harvard physics faculty and postdocs, lab tours, information on fee waivers, and helping students work on their applications to Harvard. The workshop was generously funded by the Heising Simons Foundation.The students also had the chance to attend events with faculty and get to know other women in the program during dinner and a movie.For students like Tracy Edwards, who came to the workshop from Hampton University in Virginia, the realization that she was part of a community of like-minded women who wanted to study physics was invaluable.“It’s like a drink of water,” she said of seeing the other women attending the conference. “When you’re really parched, you’re in a desert and have no water and are just desperate. And I come here and I can say, ‘You look like me. You have the same experience as me.’ It’s like a drink of water.”,Like many of the students who attended the workshop, Edwards had repeatedly been told she didn’t belong.“I saw an ad for this program on Facebook. It was 10 p.m., and I’d spent eight hours working on the application,” she said. “I thought there was no way I would get invited, but I just needed something to hope for, because I felt like no matter what I did I wasn’t going to get anywhere.”That belief, she said, stemmed from a long history of dispiriting conversations with faculty that “destroyed” her confidence.“This past summer, I took a math class, and the professor told me that the only reason I would get into grad school was because I’m black — that I was just a racial quota,” she said. “After one test that I didn’t do very well on, I emailed him to ask what I could do to improve, and he emailed me back and said, ‘You’re not worth my time.’ And that hurts, having a teacher who is supposed to help you and teach you and guide you say you’re not worth their time. What do you say to that?” “When you’re really parched, you’re in a desert and have no water and are just desperate. And I come here and I can say, ‘You look like me. You have the same experience as me.’ It’s like a drink of water.” — Tracy Edwards, Hampton University Related Percentages of women and minorities who are tenured and tenure-track reach record highs Learning to talk about race in the workplace Faculty diversity continues to grow For many of the other women attending the conference, stories like Edwards’ are maddeningly familiar.“The level of discrimination I felt in my first year of physics was horrible,” said Sideena Grace, a junior at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn. “I was working three jobs, so I did terrible in my physics class, and one of my professors told me last week that they expect me to have the lowest grade in the class because I struggled in [it].“I just broke down because I’m just tired of explaining myself,” she continued. “The expectation for me is lower, so now I have to work three times harder to prove them wrong.”And though last week’s conference is a critical step forward in encouraging women of color to follow their passion for physics and apply to programs like Harvard’s, Edwards emphasized institutional change is also necessary.“As a minority woman, it’s not my job to correct your bad behavior,” she said. “Yes, it’s great for us to be here and break the mold or break the pattern, but it’s also the job of professors and people who are in admissions to acknowledge their own biases and fix them. I shouldn’t be expected to.” Author Allison Manswell examines importance of open dialogue An update on Harvard’s diversity, inclusion efforts In Q&A session, John Wilson says mission of ‘inclusive excellence’ is underway last_img read more

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Louis van Gaal claims 2015 was “a very good year” and targets title in 2016

first_imgLouis van Gaal believes 2015 should largely be regarded as “a very good year” for Manchester United despite their current woes. United are out of the Champions League and in the middle of their worst run for 26 seasons, but the United manager thinks it would be wrong to judge the year based on their displays in December. After a dour 0-0 draw against PSV and a stalemate against Leicester, United began the month with a goalless encounter against West Ham. Press Association Defeats against Bournemouth, Norwich, Stoke and Wolfsburg followed – as well as another goalless draw against Chelsea – and all of a sudden United were nine points behind leaders Arsenal in sixth position. United may be ending the year on a low point, but after guiding the club to fourth last season and adding more “balance” to the squad in the summer, Van Gaal believes the team has moved forward over the last 12 months. “When you don’t assess December it was a very good year, 2015,” said the United manager, who has spent more than £250million since taking over 18 months ago. “But you cannot do that because a year has 12 months. “I think we have fulfilled the wish and our aim in the first season and after that we have managed to give balance to the team and that resulted in November we were first. “Then we are out of the Champions League and that gives us a big blow.” Those comments may not go down well with the United fans who voiced their concerns about Van Gaal and his style of play long before December. Some United supporters have booed their team off and implored them to attack during matches after becoming annoyed at the ponderous, possession-based style often on display at Old Trafford. Despite United’s poor form, Van Gaal still has his eyes on the title. “We need to win because at the end of the season I want to be top, not middle,” Van Gaal said. Although United failed to beat Chelsea on Monday, the team’s performance in the goalless stalemate was encouraging enough to prevent a fan revolt and save the manager. Van Gaal admits the pressure is still on him, however, as he cannot afford for the likes of Arsenal, Leicester, Manchester City and Tottenham to break away. Van Gaal added: “We have to get points otherwise the gap is too big and that is why we have to do what we have to do. “We have to work, prepare the game, perform and then evaluate the game again. That is of course much more difficult when you don’t win than when you win.” The pressure on Van Gaal will increase if United fail to beat Swansea at Old Trafford on Saturday. “You have to show it for 90 minutes against the resistance of the opponent and also under the pressure of the environment and the pressure you put yourself under,” said Van Gaal, who has lost all three games against Swansea since becoming United manager. “And you have to cope with that. “I was three times lost against Swansea, and then you have to evaluate why you lost. It is always like that, then you continue with the same vicious circle of working. “There is no magic, it is looking at what has happened and what can improve, as a team but also as an individual player.” Jesse Lingard remains a doubt for the game on Saturday. last_img read more

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