Ulrick & Short

first_imgIngredient solutions developer Ulrick & Short (Pontefract, West Yorkshire) says it has come up with a healthier option for fat replacement in baked goods.”This has to be our most successful launch to date, with amazing feedback already. Delyte5 is competitively priced. It is a low-fat option that doesn’t affect quality. There is no compromise on taste, unlike many low-calorie products. Even healthier option levels of less than 3% can be achieved,” says Adrian Short, director of Ulrick & Short.last_img

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Ginsters’ festive cheer

first_imgGinsters has launched three new festive lines to capitalise on consumer demand for party food and traditional flavours. A new 12-pack of Mini Festive Rolls in Pork and Cranberry and a standard Mini Sausage Roll 12-pack are offered. Ginsters has also brought in a limited-edition Christmas Sandwich, available in seasonal packaging, with a turkey, bacon and cranberry filling. “We’re introducing flavours that consu-mers really associate with this time of year,” said Andy Valentine, head of brand marketing for Ginsters.RRP: Rolls – £2, Christmas Sandwich – £2.99[http://www.ginsters.co.uk]last_img

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NAMB plans for busy conference schedule

first_imgThe National Association of Master Bakers (NAMB) has a raft of activities planned for its 122nd annual conference, taking place from 8-11 May at The Highcliff Marriott, Bournemouth.On Saturday 9 May, a golf tournament – The Neil Houliston Cup – will be played at the nearby Meyrick Park Golf Club. There is also a sightseeing boat trip around the coast for Association members. A Saturday night cocktail party will be followed by a four-course banquet meal, the presidential speech and music.Sunday morning kicks off with the AGM, followed by a panel of speakers: Kevin Kingsland, chartered psychologist, TSRi; Joe Hale, consultant, Dragon Brands; and David Powell, Master of the Worshipful Company. The afternoon will see the installation of president elect, Neil MacSymons, as well as a church service, presided over by Paul Jones of former 1960s rhythm and blues band Manfred Mann. And an evening cocktail party has The Wurzles as its theme, with music by tribute band The Mangled Wurzles.l For details, contact Karen Dear on 01920 860117.last_img read more

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Anti-cupcakes

first_imgAnd if you’ve had your fill of cupcakes, meaty or otherwise, you could always try dieting with these low-cal creations made, appetisingly, of cardboard. These cakes are the work of English artist Patianne Stevenson, based in Seattle – see www.patiannestevenson.comlast_img

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FSA sets out stall for sat fat reduction

first_imgThe Food Standards Agency (FSA) has unveiled the first raft of its recommendations for reducing saturated fat and added sugar in bakery pro-ducts, following its consultation last summer.It is encouraging the baking industry to reduce saturated fat in biscuits, cakes and buns, as well as increase the availability of smaller portion sizes.The Agency has announced specific targets to reduce the saturated fat content in plain sweet and savoury biscuits, and plain cakes by at least 10%; and 5% in non-plain biscuits (those not containing chocolate) by 2012.A revised deadline of 2014 has been given for a 5% reductionin saturated fat in existing biscuits containing chocolate and non-plain cakes; this is designed to take into account the increased technical challenges involved in making these goods.Further recommendations on pastry, savoury snacks, meat products and dairy will follow early in the summer.l The FSA has also published commitments from a number of bakery manufacturers highlighting the progress they’ve made with salt reduction. Marks & Spencer revealed that its bread and sandwiches now meet the 2012 salt reduction targets, while Burton’s Foods said that 95% of its sweet filled biscuits and 98% of sweet unfilled biscuits are already under the 2012 maximum category targets.last_img read more

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Report Food wastage survey: Brits are most likely to waste bread

first_imgA survey carried out for Waitrose has found that the average person in the UK bins around £400-worth of perishables per year, while more than half of those polled (56%) admitted to throwing away bread every week.Other perishables frequently thrown away each week were bananas (32%); bagged salads (30%); cold meats (18%); and milk (17%)Those living in Brighton were found to be the worst offenders when it came to binning uneaten food on a daily basis, with 16.67% admitting to it, compared to 12.87% of those living in London. The survey, taken this month by Onepoll, revealed that Chelmsford in Essex was best, with only 2% of its residents throwing away food daily. Over 14% of Oxford’s residents bin food each day, compared to 13% in Wrexham, 6.94% in Cambridge, and 5.36% in Norwich.Despite the high percentage of food wastage, the survey found that over 60% of Brits take leftovers to work for lunch the next day, and over 92% reuse shopping bags. Over 73% of those questioned also said they felt guilty about throwing away gone-off food.Waitrose announced the results of the survey to raise awareness of HRH The Prince of Wales’ new Start initiative to encourage Brits to live a more sustainable way of life.last_img read more

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The heat is on

first_imgWhat is the difference between a toasted sandwich sold by Subway and one sold by Quiznos? Answer: 17.5% VAT, soon to go up to 20%. Why? because HMRC treats one as hot food and not the other.It is all to do with the legal definition of hot food for the purposes of VAT. The law makes suppliers of hot food subject to VAT. But to be classed as hot food, the food must have been heated for the dominant purposes of hot consumption. In other words, if the food was heated for some other purpose, it may be zero-rated for VAT. The trouble lies in establishing the purpose.In the case of Quiznos, a tax tribunal found that the dominant application of heat was to toast the sandwich, but for Subway, the tribunal found that the same process had a dominant purpose of making the food hot for consumption and the toasting was not the dominant element.In the past, the VAT tribunal has found that the dominant purpose in applying heat to hot meat pies (Pimblett) and Cornish pasties is to finish the baking process, the same is true of hot ciabatta melts (Ainsleys) and panini (Warren), to name but a few zero-rated items. On the other hand, freshly baked pizza is taxed.So how do you go about deciding which rate of tax is correct for your product? By checking the temperature. Did you know that the law regards something as hot if it is above ambient air temperature? This means that, on a cold day, lots of things could be regarded as hot even if your customer would regard them as cold. Subway’s toasted sandwiches were found by the tribunal to be lukewarm, but this made them above ambient air temperature.The other feature is that, if any part of a product is above ambient air temperature, the whole of the product is treated as hot. So lukewarm toast containing cold salad may be classed as hot.Once you have a temperature reading that is anything over ambient air temperature, you must then ask yourself your purpose in heating it. Is your purpose to complete a baking or similar process, or is it so that an item can be intentionally eaten hot by your customer? This bit sounds simple, but in practice, it is a difficult question. Recently, the tribunal has set about analysing intention in evermore complex ways for instance wishing to see franchise agreements of food outlets, operational manuals and advertising materials. The tribunal may attach great significance to a picture of a product showing steam rising from it, for example.The HMRC viewHMRC does offer guidance in its public notices, which are available online and you may wish to speak to them about this. But remember, HMRC is a tax collector and the number of tribunal cases it has lost shows that it is in the habit of ruling that hot food should be subject to VAT where it should not have done. So bakers need to think very carefully about a product before taking the matter to HMRC.Also, be prepared for HMRC to come to you and find products currently free of VAT to be reconsidered. In such cases, it is normal for HMRC to issue a back-dated assessment and charge interest, even where the tax was not collected. Sometimes, reconsidering the dominant purpose for heating may lead to a back-claim to HMRC for overpaid VAT, where VAT has been charged by mistake.But where agreement cannot be reached, appeals against HMRC decisions are taken to the first-tier tribunal tax chamber, a specialist court designated to deal with tax issues. HMRC has solicitors to deal with these issues, who normally instruct a specialist tax barrister to represent them. Although this sounds daunting, with careful preparation, a tribunal appeal can run smoothly. Even if the taxpayer loses the appeal, HMRC will not seek to recover its legal costs unless the appeal was frivolous or vexatious or there had been an agreement on costs at the onset. Each case must be looked at on its own merits.l Dipak Jotangia is an expert in tax, fraud and regulatory work at Dass Solicitorslast_img read more

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Premier set to close site in Hampshire

first_imgPremier Foods is to close its Hovis distribution centre in Chandler’s Ford, Hampshire, due to a reduction in volumes of supermarket own-brand bread.The company has entered into consultation with staff and their representatives at the site, which employs around 60 people. A spokesman for Premier told British Baker that the proposed closure was due to a drop in sales of own-label bread.”As well as making the Hovis brand, we also manufacture a range of retailer-branded bread and other bakery products. During 2010, we continued to grow sales of Hovis. But we saw a decline in these other areas. The impact of this has been a reduction in volume, which has prompted a review of our distribution arrangements.”Value sales of own-label products in Hovis’ bakery division fell 22.1% (year ended 31 December 2010). Branded sales rose 1.7%.>>Hovis profits increase as wheat cost pressure riseslast_img read more

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Bizerba kit is a cut above

first_imgA new precision bread-cutting machine from Bizerba cuts hygienically without the need for oil, helping to prevent mould build-up and the spread of germs.The BS 38 cuts any type of bread with a diameter of up to 30cm, in half, quarter or into individual slices, at up to 100 slices per minute. It processes both warm and soft bread, as well as particularly hard and chunky coarse rye bread and wholemeal bread. Three save buttons enable rapid change-over between the standard cutting thicknesses.Its circular blade has an easy-to-clean protective hood.last_img

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RedBlack targets ordering

first_imgRedBlack Software has released a new Automated Orders function for its CyBake Touch shop management solution, which claims to take the guesswork out of predicting shop sales.Standalone product Cybake Touch runs on EPoS tills to provide a link between head office and retail outlets via the internet. The new Automated Orders function generates its own suggested orders, for a retail baker, for the following week. “The suggested orders are created from an algorithm agreed with each customer,” said the firm. “For example, on short shelf-life products, the Automated Orders software may use an average of the last week’s actual sales plus a percentage uplift to suggest what should be ordered for the following week.”Shop managers are still required to review and confirm the suggested orders, which allows them to moderate the results for changes to the usual routine, such as school holidays.last_img read more

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