Ocean City Tabernacle Opens for 136th Summer on Sunday

first_imgNews release from the Ocean City Tabernacle:The Ocean City Tabernacle, a tradition since 1879, will kick off its 136th summer in Ocean City on Sunday (May 24, 2015).This year the Tabernacle will unveil a new organizational look and continue its focus on serving as a trusted resource center for the community.“Dating back to Ocean City’s earliest beginnings, the Ocean City Tabernacle has served as a gathering place for members of the community,” interim President and CEO Paula Bender said.  “For decades, residents would turn to the Tabernacle to find help with life’s everyday challenges. As the needs of Ocean City have grown, the Tabernacle has grown right along with them.”Today’s Ocean City Tabernacle offers dozens of programs and events designed to support, strengthen and inspire those who visit Ocean City and call it home. All programs are nondenominational and open to all.Services include: rental facilities for youth weekend retreats; pre-school and nursery programs; the Son Club after-school program; family-friendly entertainment at the Moorlyn Family Theater; summer programs for kids of all ages and Sunday worship services with live music and inspirational speakers.These programs are evidence of the new top-to-bottom focus on making the Tabernacle and its services more accessible to families, individuals, visitors and residents. Leaders say they will even be launching an all-new user friendly website within the next few weeks.“We are chock full of programs and resources that cross the generations,” Bender said. “We can’t wait to open the doors to our membership and we are encouraging folks who have never been here to stop in and see what the Tabernacle is all about.”Jonathan EvansThe public is invited to the Tabernacle’s grand opening festivities on Sunday, which include old-fashioned hymn sings followed by Sunday morning worship services at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.The featured speaker is Jonathan Evans, a former NFL fullback and current chaplain for the Dallas Cowboys, who seeks to impact audiences through faith. Evans is the co-author of “Get in the Game,” a practical guidebook filled with sports analogies and spiritual truths aimed at encouraging readers to live victoriously.last_img read more

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Bizerba kit is a cut above

first_imgA new precision bread-cutting machine from Bizerba cuts hygienically without the need for oil, helping to prevent mould build-up and the spread of germs.The BS 38 cuts any type of bread with a diameter of up to 30cm, in half, quarter or into individual slices, at up to 100 slices per minute. It processes both warm and soft bread, as well as particularly hard and chunky coarse rye bread and wholemeal bread. Three save buttons enable rapid change-over between the standard cutting thicknesses.Its circular blade has an easy-to-clean protective hood.last_img

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23-month-old child dead after apparent drowning in Elkhart

first_imgIndianaLocalNews By Jon Zimney – July 25, 2020 0 515 Twitter 23-month-old child dead after apparent drowning in Elkhart Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest (Jon Zimney/95.3 MNC) A 23-month-old child died in an apparent drowning.Elkhart County Sheriff’s Deputies were called around 9:30 p.m. on Friday, July 24, to the 25000 block of Snyder Street where they found the toddler.The child was transported to Elkhart General Hospital and later pronounced dead, according to the Elkhart County Sheriff’s Office.The Elkhart County Homicide Unit is investigating.This is a developing story. Check back for updates. Google+ Previous articleCass County woman, 79, killed after being struck by golf cartNext articleMishawaka Police investigating shooting on Lincoln Way East Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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Phil Lesh Plays ‘Light’ Themed Set With Neal Casal, Jackie Greene & More [Full Audio]

first_imgGrateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh recently brought a unique concept to Terrapin Crossroads. Dubbed “From Darkness To Light,” the first night of the run featured songs that referenced “darkness,” including some “moon” themed tunes like “Mountains Of The Moon” and “Bad Moon Rising.”Night two saw Lesh return with a similar lineup for the “light” performance, which opened up with The Beatles’ fan-favorite, “Here Comes The Sun.” The full band included Neal Casal and Jackie Greene on guitars, Lesh on bass, Adam MacDougall on keys, Mark Levy on drums, and Nicki Bluhm on vocals. Together the band worked through a number of Grateful Dead originals and classic covers, including segues like “Dreams” into “Eyes Of The World” into “Within You Without You.”The show also featured an acoustic backyard encore, where the band treated fans to a handful of selections like “Ripple” and the finale, “Not Fade Away.” Love is real, not fade away.Listen to the full show streaming below, as well as the full light-themed setlist.Setlist: Phil Lesh & Friends at Terrapin Crossroads, San Rafael, CA – 7/6/16Jam > Here Comes the Sun nc, Mr. Tambourine Man jgr, Down to the River to Pray nb, Dreams jgr nb > Jam (w/Mountain Jam riffs) > Eyes of the World pl > Within You Without You nc > Scarlet Begonias jgr nb > Beautiful Day jgr, Somebody to Love nb, Broken Arrow pl, Both Sides Now nb >  Franklin’s Tower jgr nb nc pl (Scarlet coda ending), Comes a Time nc > Dark Star v2 jgr nc nb > The Wheel pl jgr nb nc Encore: You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away pl jgr nc nb, Angel Band jgr pl nb, Down to the River to Pray nb, Ripple pl jgr nb, Not Fade Away pl jgr nb Set list compiled by Rob Scalcione via Philzone.As an added bonus, you can watch the full video for the “darkness” 7/5/16 show below.last_img read more

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Dead & Company Debuts “High Time” In Celebratory Seasonal Show At Hollywood Bowl [Videos]

first_imgIt’s that time of year again: the Golden State Warriors are in the NBA Finals, and Dead & Company is performing at the Hollywood Bowl.It’s a fitting overlap given the Grateful Dead’s deep connections to basketball in the band’s native Bay Area and beyond. The Dead first formed in 1965, the same year the Warriors drafted the legendary Rick Barry. The Marin, California outfit came back from a nearly year-long hiatus in 1975, mere months after Barry led the Warriors to their first championship in Golden State.Over the years, the Dead’s hooks to hoops have been more than incidental. The band sponsored the Lithuanian men’s national basketball team, tie-dye shirts and all, during its run to the bronze medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. Nowadays, Bob Weir and Mickey Hart can often be seen at NBA playoff games—this year, in Portland and Oakland—sitting with Bill Walton, an avowed Deadhead since the Basketball Hall of Famer was a high school hoops star in San Diego.Related: Bob Weir, Jackie Greene Sing National Anthem Ahead Of Golden State Warriors NBA Playoff Game [Watch]Dead & Company bears its own parallels to the basketball world. This Dead iteration, featuring John Mayer on guitar and vocals and Oteil Burbridge (formerly of the Allman Brothers Band) on bass first formed in 2015, after the Dead played their “Fare Thee Well” shows with Phil Lesh, Phish’s Trey Anastasio and Bruce Hornsby in Santa Clara and Chicago—after the Warriors’ recent run of five straight Finals appearances first began. In 2017, Dead & Company played its first shows at the Hollywood Bowl, while Kevin Durant was en route to Finals MVP honors at the start of Golden State’s current push for a three-peat.Dead & Company know a thing or two about adding all-time talent like KD to their team. While Bobby, Mickey and Bill Kreutzmann will always be the OGs—the Dead’s equivalent of Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green—there’s no denying how gifted and fitting an addition John Mayer has been to this lineup.The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter, guitarist and producer (and youngest Dead man, by far, at 41) continued to invigorate the 54-year-old band with his soothing vocals and wailing guitar throughout a winding three-plus hour stroll down Shakedown Street in front of a packed house of 17,500. His axe work and his voice were particularly poignant during a stirring rendition of “Sugaree”, featuring a guitar solo that had the audience howling into the smoggy Los Angeles night.But John, of course, isn’t the only addition to the Dead who shined. Oteil Burbridge was once again brilliant on the bass, and showed off his smooth voice while singing the Dead & Company debut of “High Time”. Jeff Chimenti is far from a newcomer; he’s been playing with Bobby since RatDog in 1997 and has manned the keyboard with several other iterations of the Dead—including the Other Ones, Phil Leah and Friends and Furthur, and Fare Thee Well—over his two-plus decades in the GD universe. Still, he played with a quiet fire on the keys all across the setlist, with some standout ivory tickling on “Iko Iko” and “Not Fade Away”.All the while, the Dead’s OGs were every bit as reliable (if not spectacular in their own right) as their Golden State counterparts have been in these playoffs.Bobby sounded just as rejuvenated at the Bowl as he did during his last appearance in Southern California when he led the Wolf Bros in a headlining set at the inaugural BeachLife Festival in Redondo Beach. Mickey and Bill did their part to keep the beat and splash around during “Drums” and “Space” in the second set.Through it all, Bill Walton stood tall in the pit, and got supersized on the screens during “Franklin’s Tower” and an encore of “Terrapin Station”. Odds are, he will be back at the Bowl on Tuesday, as any dedicated Deadhead would be.Nor would it be all that surprising to see “Big Red” with the Dead on Wednesday, though it won’t be at a show that day. Instead, keep an eye out for Bobby, Mickey, and Walton at Game 3 of the 2019 Finals in Oakland before the band plays on through a three-night stint at the Gorge in Washington starting Thursday.Check out a few videos from the show below:Dead & Company – “Cold Rain and Snow” [Pro-Shot][Video: Dead & Company]Dead & Company – “High Time”[Video: Still Dead]Dead & Company – “Iko Iko” [Pro-Shot][Video: Dead & Company]Dead & Company – “Sugaree”[Video: Still Dead]Dead & Company – “Stella Blue”[Video: Still Dead]Dead & Company – “Lady With A Fan”/”Terrapin Station”[Video: Still Dead]For a full list of Dead & Company’s upcoming tour dates, head to their website here.Setlist: Dead & Company | Hollywood Bowl | Los Angeles, CA | 6/3/19Set One: Cold Rain And Snow, Hell In A Bucket, Easy Wind, Mississippi Half-Step, High Time, Jack Straw, Bird Song, Don’t Ease Me InSet Two: Iko Iko, New Speedway Boogie, Sugaree, Help On The Way > Slipknot! > Franklin’s Tower > Drums/Space > Stella Blue, Not Fade AwayEncore: Lady With A Fan > Terrapin Stationlast_img read more

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Muting the Mozart effect

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqSY3INIxAs” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/oqSY3INIxAs/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Children get plenty of benefits from music lessons. Learning to play instruments can fuel their creativity, and practicing can teach much-needed focus and discipline. And the payoff, whether in learning a new song or just mastering a chord, often boosts self-esteem.But Harvard researchers now say that one oft-cited benefit — that studying music improves intelligence — is a myth.Though it has been embraced by everyone from advocates for arts education to parents hoping to encourage their kids to stick with piano lessons, a pair of studies conducted by Samuel Mehr, a Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) doctoral student working in the lab of Elizabeth Spelke, the Marshall L. Berkman Professor of Psychology, found that music training had no effect on the cognitive abilities of young children. The studies are described in a Dec. 11 paper published in the open-access journal PLoS One.“More than 80 percent of American adults think that music improves children’s grades or intelligence,” Mehr said. “Even in the scientific community, there’s a general belief that music is important for these extrinsic reasons. But there is very little evidence supporting the idea that music classes enhance children’s cognitive development.”The notion that music training can make someone smarter, Mehr said, can largely be traced to a single study published in Nature. In it, researchers identified what they called the “Mozart effect.” After listening to music, test subjects performed better on spatial tasks.Though the study was later debunked, the notion that simply listening to music could make someone smarter became firmly embedded in the public imagination, and spurred a host of follow-up studies, including several that focused on the cognitive benefits of music lessons.Though dozens of studies have explored whether and how music and cognitive skills might be connected, when Mehr and colleagues reviewed the literature they found only five studies that used randomized trials, the gold standard for determining causal effects of educational interventions on child development. Of the five, only one showed an unambiguously positive effect, and it was so small — just a 2.7 point increase in IQ after a year of music lessons — that it was barely enough to be statistically significant.“The experimental work on this question is very much in its infancy, but the few published studies on the topic show little evidence for ‘music makes you smarter,’” Mehr said.To explore the connection between music and cognition, Mehr and his colleagues recruited 29 parents and 4-year-old children from the Cambridge area. After initial vocabulary tests for the children and music aptitude tests for the parents, each was randomly assigned to one of two classes, one that had music training, or another that focused on visual arts.“We wanted to test the effects of the type of music education that actually happens in the real world, and we wanted to study the effect in young children, so we implemented a parent-child music enrichment program with preschoolers,” Mehr said. “The goal is to encourage musical play between parents and children in a classroom environment, which gives parents a strong repertoire of musical activities they can continue to use at home with their kids.”Harvard study on music and cognition Children and parents take part in a music training class as part of a Harvard study that explored whether studying music improved cognition among young children.Among the key changes Mehr and his colleagues made from earlier studies were controlling for the effect of different teachers — Mehr taught both the music and visual arts classes — and using assessment tools designed to test areas of cognition, vocabulary, mathematics, and two spatial tasks.“Instead of using something general, like an IQ test, we tested four specific domains of cognition,” Mehr said. “If there really is an effect of music training on children’s cognition, we should be able to better detect it here than in previous studies, because these tests are more sensitive than tests of general intelligence.”The study’s results, however, showed no evidence for cognitive benefits of music training.While the groups performed comparably on vocabulary and number-estimation tasks, the assessments showed that children who received music training performed slightly better at one spatial task, while those who received visual arts training performed better at the other.“Study One was very small. We only had 15 children in the music group, and 14 in the visual arts,” Mehr said. “The effects were tiny, and their statistical significance was marginal at best. So we attempted to replicate the study, something that hasn’t been done in any of the previous work.”To replicate the effect, Mehr and colleagues designed a second study that recruited 45 parents and children, half of whom received music training, and half of whom received no training.Just as in the first study, Mehr said, there was no evidence that music training offered any cognitive benefit. Even when the results of both studies were pooled to allow researchers to compare the effect of music training, visual arts training, and no training, there was no sign that any group outperformed the others.“There were slight differences in performance between the groups, but none were large enough to be statistically significant,” Mehr said. “Even when we used the finest-grained statistical analyses available to us, the effects just weren’t there.”While the results suggest studying music may not be a shortcut to educational success, Mehr said there is still substantial value in music education.“There’s a compelling case to be made for teaching music that has nothing to do with extrinsic benefits,” he said. “We don’t teach kids Shakespeare because we think it will help them do better on the SATs. We do it because we believe Shakespeare is important.“Music is an ancient, uniquely human activity. The oldest flutes that have been dug up are 40,000 years old, and human song long preceded that,” he said. “Every single culture in the world has music, including music for children. Music says something about what it means to be human, and it would be crazy not to teach this to our children.”The study was supported by funding from the Dana Foundation, and inspired by the work of William Safire.last_img read more

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Future of theater? Not exactly sure, but Diane Paulus is working on it

first_img A.R.T. opens up with virtual programming GAZETTE:  How else is the upcoming family show changing?PAULUS:  “Jack and the Beanstalk” is being written by two Harvard undergraduates [Julie Riew ’21 and Ian Chan ’22] as a 45-minute Zoom musical. Much of the engagement is planned around that kind of Zoom experience for kids — or, as we like to say, kids and their grownups, because on the other end of the Zoom there is a family sitting in the living room.GAZETTE:  Is moving into the virtual world pushing other creative boundaries?PAULUS:  We’re partnering on a new play with four theaters in December. There are coproductions all the time, but you’re going to see these more and more as a way to pool resources, creative teams, and budgets. And this is a project that was created by the playwrights specifically for this moment. This is not a play that is being put onto Zoom just because that’s how we have to do it. This is an artistic creation born to be delivered in this moment through the medium of the virtual space, marrying content and form.GAZETTE:  What else are you wrestling with going forward?PAULUS:  How are we pivoting to survive artistically, emotionally, spiritually, financially? How are we going to survive this moment? And what can we learn that might impact our work when we come back? Whenever that is.The Office of the Vice Provost for Advances in Learning will host a joint conversation with Diane Paulus and Joe Allen, Roadmap for Recovery and Resilience, on Oct. 29.Interview was lightly edited for clarity and length. A.R.T.’s Diane Paulus nominated for Best Direction of a Musical ‘Jagged Little Pill’ snags record 15 Tony nominations Relatedcenter_img The American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.), which just received a near-record 15 Tony nominations for the musical “Jagged Little Pill,” is looking ahead even as its Loeb Drama Center home remains dark. Diane Paulus, the Terrie and Bradley Bloom Artistic Director, recently spoke to the Gazette about the Tony recognition, A.R.T.’s wide-ranging fall schedule, and the very survival of theater itself.Q&ADiane PaulusGAZETTE:  Congratulations on the Tony nominations! Only “Hamilton,” which had 16, got more.PAULUS: Thank you. I think you’d have to factor in that this was an abbreviated season. What 15 nomination means to me is that there’s recognition of a breadth of contribution, which makes me the happiest of all, as the director. My colleagues, my team, the actors — that breadth of effort is recognized.GAZETTE:  It’s great recognition of what you have referred to as “the transformative potential of shared space and shared experience” — an experience that is currently on hold. What is the state of theater right now?PAULUS: Theater is about collective presence, the shared space, and the transformational energy. That’s something we just can’t have right now. But there are ways in which innovation can happen, and theaters, including the A.R.T., are looking at how to do it — how to reach for that connection in a digital space. We have artists to support. We have audiences to stay engaged with. We have our survival as a sector. So institutions like the A.R.T., while we might not be delivering theater as we know it, we are doing what we can to support artists at this moment, to stay engaged with audiences.GAZETTE:  How do you do that when you can’t have live in-person performance?PAULUS:  What we have to look at is how do we maintain our creativity and artistry? How do we keep the pilot light going? An artist practices and trains and goes to class. And that’s how they keep their creativity going. It’s just working those muscles, participating in creative development. “This is an opportunity for a larger, broader audience to have access to theater. You can see it on your telephone.” Virtually Oberon, an all-ages musical, and world premiere fill the fall GAZETTE:  And live streaming, like the new Virtually Oberon series or the upcoming “Jack and the Beanstalk: A Musical Adventure.”PAULUS:  Yes, you’re not getting real live response, but, you know, playing your guitar and putting it out on the internet is a creative expression. Letting what’s inside out. There’s no replacing live performance, even with live streams, right? You can get as close to live with a live stream, but you still are not in the same space. But we all get it. We’re in a global pandemic; we understand why we need to follow these paths.GAZETTE:  Tell us about hosting local artists, like poet-rapper-educator Oompa, with your Virtually Oberon series.PAULUS:  We’ve seen so many artists broadcast from their kitchens and their living rooms. And we thought, we have this amazing venue. How can we, with all the health and safety protocols, open it and offer our space as a studio for artists? How can we partner with artists to amplify their work, give them production support, put them on a platform, and get them out through our institutional muscle?GAZETTE:  The fall season also features three free discussion series — Civically Speaking, Behind the Scenes, and the weekly Tuesday Lunch Room — which cover a range of topics from creativity to the A.R.T.’s ongoing commitment to cultural transformation.PAULUS: This disruption has made us think about how else we can be an engine inside the University. Being able to create a series like Civically Speaking and inviting faculty to conversations around issues of history and politics and democracy, or when an artist like Claudia Rankine can be in conversation with Orlando Patterson, John Cowles Professor of Sociology, to talk about racial reckoning and whiteness in this moment [Thursday at 7 p.m.] … It’s not theater like you knew it, but what has always been exciting to the art is how do we catalyze conversations? How do we make space — albeit virtual — in this moment to be together in conversation? How do we find a deepening of compassion and empathy and learning? How do we do that with artists, thinkers, faculty at Harvard? We’re still flexing all those muscles.GAZETTE:  Are there any upsides to the current constraints?PAULUS:  One defining feature of live theater is the fact that we can only have a certain number of people, defined by our capacity in our auditorium or our studio or wherever we’re performing. But the virtual sphere is infinite in comparison. This is an opportunity for a larger, broader audience to have access to theater. You can see it on your telephone. You don’t have to be at the theater necessarily. And so that’s an opportunity. [A.R.T. is also offering pay-what-you-can options for ticketed events.]GAZETTE:  Are there other benefits to not staging shows in the traditional way?PAULUS:  We always do a family show every year. It usually takes place at the Loeb Drama Center in the winter holiday period. We’re pivoting because we realized, well, we don’t have to wait. We’re not bound by a calendar: When is the stage free so we can put on our family show in rep with another show? We can develop this and put it out earlier. We can record an album in advance and get that out. There’s creativity that is unleashed when you realize that there are certain constraints of the old model that you don’t have to follow.last_img read more

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Irrigate Yard Wisely

first_img“Night is best,” he said. “From 9 p.m. to 9 a.m., you get the best water pressure andwater supply. And you don’t extend the wet period on the leaves.” No matter what system you choose, you have to manage it right. Trying to keep their lawn and garden beautiful under the hot summer sun, manyGeorgians are hauling out the hoses. But some get tired of constantly movingsprinklers. “Get a plan,” said Kerry Harrison, an engineer with the University of GeorgiaExtension Service. “Don’t just go out there and start pointing and putting in sprinklers.And don’t buy a system based completely on the cost.” “Of course as it heats up, lawns in full sun may need more than that,” he said. Thinking about installing permanent irrigation? Consider four points: design, quality ofmaterial, installation and management. Without any one of the four, Harrison said, thesystem can’t be its most efficient. “Excess water can cause disease and insect problems,” Harrison said. “Too much isalmost worse than not enough.” Grass leaves that stay wet invite disease organisms to invade and cause problems.center_img Harrison said a well-designed irrigation system will be expensive. “It’s going to bemore than you think it’ll be,” he said. “But that’s what it takes to get an efficient,quality system that’s installed correctly.” Evelyn Sturgis, a Tift County homeowner, based her decision on expense and is sorryfor it now. “Cost was a factor,” she said, “and I think if we had it to do over, wewouldn’t let that be top priority.” Irrigation systems with timers offer solutions to many watering woes. But prepare for abigger bill than you think. Georgia lawns require an inch to an inch-and-a-half of water every week. Harrison saidwatering half that amount twice a week provides the perfect amount of water for mostlawns and gardens. It also allows nature to provide some water. Rainfall could save youboth water and trouble. Harrison said the time when he sees the most sprinklers running — daytime — isactually the worst time to water. Permanent irrigation systems allow easy, complete watering any time you choose. Butthere is more to installing a good system than just hiring it done.last_img read more

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Trade war with China to cost American coal producers

first_imgTrade war with China to cost American coal producers FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:At least four cargoes of U.S. coal worth $30 million are headed to China as Beijing prepares to hit imports with hefty 25-percent tariffs, threatening a niche supply of the fuel even as China’s appetite for foreign coal shows no sign of abating.The vessels, carrying a combined 335,000 tonnes of coal, are the only confirmed cargoes in transit from the United States to China, and are scheduled to land in time to avoid the new duties.On Wednesday night, the Ministry of Commerce published its final list of U.S. items worth $16 billion in imports that will incur an additional 25-percent tariff, including coal.The penalties will come into effect on Aug. 23 after Washington plans to start collecting duties on Chinese products of the same value. Coal was also in the draft list issued in June.The new duties are likely to curb exports from the United States, which ramped up shipments in 2017 as its beleaguered coal mining sector has undergone a resurgence under U.S. President Donald Trump.The United States shipped 3.2 million tonnes of coal to China last year, up from less than 700 tonnes in 2016, making it China’s seventh largest supplier, although well behind top supplier Australia with nearly 80 million tonnes.But it takes six weeks for a cargo to travel from the United States – compared with several weeks for Indonesia and Australia – costs more to ship and U.S. coal is of a lower quality than Australian coal.That means replacing U.S. shipments with coal from other places may not be difficult, sources said.“In all aspects, U.S. coal does not have any advantages,” said Zhang Min, coal analyst at China Sublime Information Group.“According to our calculation, after the 25-percent tariff, U.S. coal will cost at least $30 per tonne more, which basically rules it out of the Chinese market.”More: U.S. coal cargoes heading for China as Beijing takes aim with new tariffslast_img read more

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Trail Mix – Davina & The Vagabonds

first_imgHer praise was well deserved. BRO – We are featuring “Devil Horns” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song? Pipes for days. Lozier’s voice is transcendent, one of those rare generational voices, and she regularly draws comparison with icons like Etta James and Amy Winehouse. Her band of Vagabonds conjures forth a musical gumbo of New Orleans and Memphis soul to back her up, providing her to opportunity reach crescendos that leave one’s heart pounding. BRO – I want to up my vagabond game. Got any advice for me? DL – I was watching a documentary in bed about the history of why the devil superficially looks like our typical red faced horned devil and my husband was in the basement banging on his drums. I shut the iPad off and started writing the song to his beat while lying in bed. “How did the devil get his horns? He got them under my bed.” That was my first thought the very first time I heard Davina Lozier, of Davina & The Vagabonds, sing. A good friend of mine had booked them to play on Music City Roots in Nashville and raved about her voice and the band’s performance. DL – Pack light, have an open heart, a full tank of gas, and a killer outfit. DL – I drink as much water as I can and get as much sleep as I can. That’s about it. Some people tell me to not talk as much between shows. Not sure if that’s because they want me to keep my voice, though. I do talk a lot. BRO – Speaking of being on tour, how do you take care of your voice while you’re on the road? I recently caught up with Davina Lozier to chat about her band’s upcoming trip to Europe, the new record, and my own vagabond spirit. DL – There so many first time cities for me on this run. I’m excited for Budapest, so I can hear some of that harmonic minor gypsy music. I’ve never been to the Czech Republic either, and I’m looking forward to all of that historic architecture. And Paris, because I want to eat a million Nutella crepes, 6,000 macaroons, and a handful of baguettes with french cheese. BRO – I see you guys are heading to Europe next month. Got a particular city you can’t wait to visit? BRO – Vintage soul has experienced a comeback in recent years. What’s behind the resurgence? Davina & The Vagabonds will be live tonight in Chattanooga before heading across the pond for a big international tour that includes, among other exotic locales, stops in Jerusalem, Budapest, Paris, and Vienna. Davina & The Vagabonds recently released their latest record, Sugar Drops, on the Compass Records label. DL – I’m not really up on my new music, but I can say that I understand if there has been a resurgence. It’s honest, from the heart music with a killer feel. And soul is sexy. How can you beat sexy? For more information about Davina & The Vagabonds, how you can grab a copy of the new record, or when the band will hit the stage near you, surf on over to their website. And be sure to take a listen to “Devil Horns,” along with tunes from Chris & Adam Carroll, Nocturnal Blonde, Humbird, and many more on this month’s Trail Mix.last_img read more

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