Eric Clapton Announces 3-Night Royal Albert Hall Run

first_imgEric Clapton has announced his first dates of 2019 and only U.K. shows of the upcoming year, with a three-night run at London’s Royal Albert Hall. Taking place May 13th, 15th, and 16th of 2019, Clapton has rounded up longtime collaborators, including guitarist Doyle Bramhall II, keyboardist Chris Stainton, bassist Nathan East, and drummer Sonny Emory.Tickets for Slowhand’s 2019 U.K. run go on sale this Friday, October 26th at 10 a.m. local time. Tickets are limited to 6 per household and are available from the venue box office, by phone and online (no counter sales), BookingsDirect.com and select authorized agents.Earlier this year, Eric Clapton announced that his final North American shows of 2018 would take place at Madison Square Garden in New York City on October 6th and 7th. In discussion with BBC Radio, he also discussed that he is losing his hearing and suffering from tinnitus, a ringing inside the ear that is often caused by prolonged exposure to loud noise.In that same interview, Clapton noted, “I’ve had quite a lot of pain over the last year. It started with lower back pain, and turned into what they call peripheral neuropathy,” he added. “[It’s] hard work to play the guitar and I’ve had to come to terms with the fact that it will not improve.” Clapton went on to tell BBC’s Stephen Wright that he would be limiting the number of plays going forward, explaining, “‘What I’ll allow myself to do, within reason, is carry on recording in the studio. I don’t want to go off the boil to the point where I’m embarrassing myself.”For more information on tickets and the upcoming Royal Albert Hall shows, head to Eric Clapton’s website here.[H/T Jambase]last_img read more

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New program shows young people how to use broadband and serve the community

first_imgComcast and One Economy will be joined by elected officials and community leaders on Friday, June 4 at 2:30 PM at the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington to kick off a major digital learning and service initiative that teaches teens and young adults from diverse, low-income backgrounds how to use broadband technologies and put that knowledge to work to increase digital literacy in the greater community.WHO:  U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy, Governor Jim Douglas, Mary Alice McKenzie, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington, David L. Cohen, Executive Vice President, Comcast Corporation, Doug Guthrie, Senior Vice President, Comcast’s Western New England Region, Pam Mackenzie, Area Vice President, Comcast Vermont, Karla Ballard, Vice President of Social Innovations for One Economy,  20 Burlington-area teens enrolled in Digital Connectors program.WHEN:                       Friday, June 4 at 2:30 PMWHERE:                     Boys & Girls Club of Burlington62 Oak Street, Burlington, VT  05401BACKGROUND:The Comcast Digital Connectors program trains young people on digital literacy skills, such as how to network computer labs, connect wireless access points and create video documentaries.  The students then volunteer their time at various organizations to help improve digital literacy in their larger communities, teaching them leadership skills and the importance of giving back.  Burlington is the fifth city in the nation to launch the Comcast Digital Connectors program and the first in Vermont.  In addition to Burlington, the Comcast Digital Connectors program has launched in Washington, D.C.; Houston, Texas; Springfield, Massachusetts; and Morgantown, West Virginia.  Other sites expected to kick off by the end of 2010 include:  Miami, Florida; Hanford, California; Dearborn, Michigan; Denver, Colorado; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Tallahassee, Florida; West Palm Beach, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Tacoma, Washington; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Chicago, Illinois; Portland, Oregon; and others to be determined.Source: Comcast. 6.2.2010last_img read more

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April 1, 2005 News and Notes

first_imgApril 1, 2005 News and Notes April 1, 2005 News & Notes News and Notes Jonathan R. Friedland of Jonathan R. Friedland, P.A., in Miami was inducted as president of the Dade County Trial Lawyers Association. Michael Andrew Haggard of Haggard, Parks, Haggard & Lewis in Coral Gables served as guest speaker at a Dade County Bar Association seminar and spoke on the topic of, “Damages in Record Verdicts — Compensatory Damages and Punitive Damages.” Additionally, Haggard served as guest speaker at the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers’ fall convention on advanced trial skills where he spoke on the topic of closing arguments. Thomas A. Dye of Carlton Fields in Tampa spoke at the American Intellectual Property Law Association Mid-Winter Institute in Lake Buena Vista. Eric A. Gordon of Arnstein & Lehr in Boca Raton has published an article in the South Palm Beach County Bar Association’s winter issue of The South County Advocate. The article is titled, “How to Get Sued in Business Without Really Trying: Avoiding the Common Pitfalls Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.” Additionally, Gordon presented a seminar titled, “You’re Hired! How to Legally and Artfully Find and Qualify Applicants and Grow Your Company in 2005.” Jack A. Weiss of Fowler White Boggs Banker in St. Petersburg was elected to the board of directors of The Suncoast Tiger Bay Club. R. Terry Rigsby of Carlton Fields in Tampa was named vice chair of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. Bruce C. Crawford of Crawford, Owen & Hines in St. Petersburg was named chair of the Pinellas Association for Retarded Children. Paul Steven Singerman and Thomas O. Wells of Berger Singerman in Miami were featured speakers at the Northern Trust Annual Bankers’ Sales Conference. Their topic was, “Asset Planning for Physicians and the Defensive Rabbi Trust Loan.” William W. Corry of Tallahassee received the 2004 Trial Lawyer of the Year Award from the Tallahassee Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates.Legal Services of Greater Miami honored John Little, Barbara Lanshe, and Lashan Fagan. Little was honored for 20 years of service. Lanshe was honored for 15 years of service. Fagan received the Alfred Feinberg Memorial Award for her aggressive advocacy on behalf of the low income community. Toni L. Wortherly of Jacksonville started a publishing company, Artistic Esquire Publishing, LLC and published her first book, Pray While You’re Prey. Steven Jaffe of Aronovitz Trial Lawyers in Miami was named to the executive board of the Broward County Trial Lawyers. Cynthia Crofoot Rignanese was recognized by the ABA for “Outstanding Community Service During National Health Care Decisions Week.” Christina McKinnon of the Law Office of Christina A. McKinnon was named the “Newcomer of the Year” by the Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr., Bar Association in Miami. Morrie I. Levine of Hollywood was elected chair of the recently formed Gold Coast Region B’nai B’rith Youth Organization Adult Commission. Levine was also installed as vice-president of membership for B’nai B’rith Justice Unit #5207. Richard M. Benrubi of Liggio, Benrubi & Williams was elected treasurer of the 2005 Palm Beach County Trial Lawyers Association. Michael G. Whelan of Ogletree Deakins presented, “The Dark Side v. The Force” at the Florida Public Employer Labor Relations Association’s 31st Annual Training Conference. Julie A. Horstkamp of Kirk-Pinkerton was appointed chair for the Sarasota Realtor Attorney Joint Committee of the Sarasota Association of Realtors/Sarasota County Bar Association for a term of one year. Richard Doran of Ausley & McMullen P.A. in Tallahassee co-presented about the unique ethical obligations and challenges faced by a state attorney general at the winter meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General in Ft. Lauderdale. J.B. Harris of Motley Rice addressed the Trial Lawyers Marketing Roundtable in Palm Springs, CA, about marketing opportunities in emerging areas of liability, including tax resolution fraud, port crane accidents, vehicle defects, and Vioxx litigation. H. Steven Vogel was the featured speaker at a continuing education program for the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountant’s and also at Florida International University, the lecture was titled, “Selected Topics in Accounting Malpractice.” Kevin E. Packman of Nelson & Levine in North Miami Beach spoke at the Aventura Roundtable Luncheon hosted by Northern Trust Bank. Packman spoke on, “The Florida Homestead Exemption.” A. Brian Phillips of Ruden McClosky in Orlando presented at the annual Louisiana State Bar Association Retreat. Phillips presentation was titled, “The Rigors of the Interdisciplinary Practice.” Karen Plunkett of Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed in Orlando was elected to the board of directors for the Southeast Legal Marketing Association. Pamela Beckham of Beckham & Beckham in Miami was elected to serve a three-year term on the Council of ABA Trial, Tort, and Insurance Practice section. Jason Gonzalez of Ausley & McMullen in Tallahassee was appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush to a four- year term on the First District Court of Appeal Judicial Nominating Commission. David C. Prather of Lytal, Reiter, Clark, Fountain & Williams in West Palm Beach was elected president of the Palm Beach County Trial Lawyers Association for 2005. Michael S. Bender of Robert Kaye & Associates in Ft. Lauderdale was elected president of the Southeast Florida Chapter of Community Association Institute. Coralee G. Penabad of Meland, Russin, Hellinger & Budwick in Miami will speak at a one day Lorman seminar on the subject of bankruptcy in Florida.last_img read more

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NSA Documents Suggest a Close Working Relationship Between NSA, U.S. Companies

first_imgNewly disclosed National Security Agency documents suggest a closer relationship between American companies and the spy agency than has been previously disclosed.The documents, published last week by The Intercept, describe “contractual relationships” between the NSA and U.S. companies, as well as the fact that the NSA has “under cover” spies working at or with some U.S. companies.While not conclusive, the material includes some clear suggestions that at least some American companies are quite willing to help the agency conduct its massive surveillance programs.The precise role of U.S. companies in the NSA’s global surveillance operations remains unclear. Documents obtained by Edward Snowden and published by various news organizations show that companies have turned over their customers’ email, phone calling records and other data under court orders. But the level of cooperation beyond those court orders has been an open question, with several leading companies, such as Apple, Google, Microsoft and Facebook, asserting that they only turn over customer information that is “targeted and specific” in response to legal demands.The documents do not identify any specific companies as collaborating with the NSA. The references are part of an inventory of operations, of which the very “fact that” they exist is classified information. These include the:“SIGINT” in NSA jargon is signals intelligence, the intercepting of data and voice communications. According to the document, “contractual relationships” can mean that U.S. companies deliberately insert “backdoors” or other vulnerabilities that the NSA then uses to access communications. The existence of deals to build these backdoors is secret:The NSA’s efforts to break encryption and establish backdoors were disclosed last year, but left open the possibility that the companies didn’t know about the activities. This new disclosure makes clear that some of those relationships are cooperative.The documents also describe a program codenamed Whipgenie. Its purpose is to safeguard one of the NSA’s most important secrets, the “relationships” between “U.S. Corporate partners” and the agency division that taps fiber optic cables. It refers to the dealings with U.S. companies as ECI 2014 exceptionally controlled information: It says:The Whipgenie document details one company’s involvement in “domestic wire access collection” 2013 an apparent reference to eavesdropping inside the United States. Under current law, such surveillance is only allowed after the government obtains a court order. But the document said that at least one “Corporate Partner” was involved in a “cooperative effort” to break into U.S. communications. This information, it says, is itself classified and should be closely guarded:The Whipgenie document makes clear that the program being shielded from public view involves data that moves through the United States. (Emails and other information from one foreign address to another frequently hopscotch across international borders as companies use the cheapest routing for traffic.) The document tells NSA officials that they should protect:In 2008, Congress authorized the agency to collect information that traveled through the United States. But the agency is supposed to discard entirely domestic communications that it picks up “incidentally.”A draft document indicates that the NSA targets U.S. manufacturers of commercial equipment used for communications. The document obliquely refers to covert operations by NSA agents aimed at what is termed “specific commercial entities.” Those companies are identified in the document only by the letters: A, B, and C.Sentry Owl, the program that protects this particular bit of spying, is among the most closely guarded secrets in the intelligence community. Documents describe it as “Exceptionally Controlled Information” that can only be disclosed to “a very few select” people in government.Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Mike Rogers, who head the congressional intelligence oversight committees, did not respond to requests for comment on whether they had been briefed on the program. Sen. Ron Wyden, an outspoken critic of NSA activities that impact U.S. residents, also declined to comment.In a statement, NSA spokeswoman Vanee Vines said NSA surveillance is authorized by law and subject to multiple layers of oversight. She added: “It should come as no surprise that NSA conducts targeted operations to counter increasingly agile adversaries.”For more coverage, read ProPublica’s previous reporting on the NSA’s efforts to break encryption, our NSA Programs Chart and the agency’s spying operations on cell phone apps.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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FDA clears single test for 12 respiratory viruses

first_imgEditor’s note: This story was revised Jan 8 to correct information about the location of the test’s manufacturer. Jan 7, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A single test that can identify up to 12 different respiratory viruses, including three kinds of influenza, from one sample has won the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) approval.The test, called the xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel (RVP), is the first that can detect and distinguish influenza A subtypes H1 and H3 and also detect influenza B, the FDA said in announcing the approval on Jan 3. Influenza A is the most severe type of flu in humans and has been the cause of pandemics, the agency noted.The new test panel is also the first test for human metapneumovirus (hMPV), which was first identified in 2001, the FDA said.The test is made by Toronto-based Luminex Molecular Diagnostics, part of Luminex Corp, headquartered in Austin, Tex. In a news release, the company called the xTAG RVP “a ground breaking test that, with a single patient sample, can assess the presence or absence of 12 viral targets and provide qualitative results in a few hours.”Conventional testing for the same viruses requires a number of separate tests and can take several days, the company said. The new product will help physicians provide appropriate treatment and prevent inappropriate antibiotic use that has helped spawn resistant microbes, the statement said.The FDA said, “The xTAG panel is the first FDA-cleared test for infectious respiratory disease viruses that uses a multiplex platform, allowing several tests to be processed using the same sample.”The test uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify viral genetic material in samples from patients, according to Jeremy Bridge-Cook, vice president of Luminex Molecular Diagnostics. The FDA said the test uses secretions from the back of the throat.The test uses tiny color-coded beads, or microspheres, that are coated with reagents specific to material from particular viruses, according to information on the Luminex Web site.”There’s a different color-coded bead for each virus in the test,” Bridge-Cook told CIDRAP News. “The Luminex instrument can identify the different color-coded beads and whether the viral target was amplified. If any of the beads is positive, that indicates whether the viral target was present in the sample.”The use of PCR to reproduce viral material “speeds up the usual process of detecting and identifying respiratory viruses, which can take up to a week,” Daniel D. Schultz, MD, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in the news release.The FDA said viruses identified by the xTAG RVP, in addition to the three forms of influenza and human metapneumovirus, include:Respiratory syncytial virus subtypes A and B, both of which are leading causes of infant pneumonia and bronchiolitis and often contribute to the development of long-term lung diseaseParainfluenza 1, 2, and 3—all leading factors in croup and the common coldRhinovirus, the most common viral infective agent in humans and another cause of the common coldAdenovirus, a cause of respiratory tract infections often similar to strep throat or tonsillitisThe 12 viruses covered by the test account for more than 85% of respiratory viral infections, the Luminex statement said.The company said the test’s ability to identify influenza subtypes H1 and H3 will be important in efforts to detect quickly any emerging pandemic flu virus. The test will make it possible to sort H1 and H3 viruses, which make up the vast majority of influenza A subtypes, from rare forms of influenza A. “This way, the few samples that do test positive for influenza A but cannot be identified as H1 or H3 subtypes can be flagged for further investigation by the CDC or local public health labs,” the company said.Bridge-Cook said the time needed to run the test will vary, but “I’d say maybe 6 hours might be a typical time.”As for the cost, he said he couldn’t give a specific figure, but added, “From a ballpark standpoint, basically the number is in the low hundreds [of dollars], as opposed to thousands of dollars, with respect to what it costs the healthcare system as a whole when the test is run.”Bridge-Cook said the test requires specially trained personnel, so it’s likely to be used mainly in hospital laboratories. But he said many hospital labs take samples from outpatient clinics, so the test would not be limited to use on inpatients.The FDA said that because the test is specific to the 12 viruses listed, it should be used with other diagnostic information, such as patient data, bacterial or viral cultures, and x-rays.See also: Jan 3 FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2008/NEW01770.htmlJan 3 Luminex news releasehttp://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=79403&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1091216&highlight=last_img read more

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Dotcoms lead Soho revival

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OSV crew detained in Angola for months under ‘false charges’

first_imgTwo Croatian offshore workers have reportedly been held captive by the Angolan authorities, under what they claim to be false charges for  ship fuel theft.According to Croatian media, the two seafarers Vanja Maričić i Duško Jelača, have been unable to leave Angola for almost three months.The pair sailed on the Sutton Tide platform supply vessel owned by Sonatide, a joint venture between Tidewater and Sonangol, when they were arrested in late March 2017.Novi List has written that the shipowner reported the crew, including the two men, of stealing fuel from the vessel, leading to their arrest in the Soyo port of Angola on March 24.Describing the arrest, one of the people in question told to Novi List: “More than forty policemen were waiting for us at the dock, together with the company representatives. They then started searching the command bridge, they dismantled and turned everything upside down.“The seafarer said that after an hour of search the company representative asked him what was going on.“I replied that I did not know and that I assumed that it was a police exercise because at that point I couldn’t have imagined that something like this could happen.“He said that while the raid found no irregularities, the police seized the seafarer’s passports, and took the crew to a local police station for interrogation.It was only then that the crew found out what the charges were – a theft of 104 cubic meters of ship fuel.“One of the crew members had reported to the company that on March 1, between 3 and 6 am in the territorial waters of the Congo, we unloaded the fuel from the ship to another vessel,“ the captain of the ship.The company then, based on that report, informed the police, leading to the detainment of the crew, which has denied the fuel theft allegations.The captain further said that all the information on the charges were given in an unofficial manner „because they did not give us any official documents, even though they took our passports and put us to a hotel.“He also said that a police inspector then came to the hotel, asking from the crew to sign some documents in Portuguese – which they do not speak. The crew, also including two Ukrainians and one Russian, refused and, according to the captain, it would later turn out the documents were an admission of guilt for all the criminal offenses they had been charged with.The Croatian Sailors UnionIn a statement on Tuesday, the Croatian Sailors’ Union said it was doing everything in its power to make life easier for the two sailors in custody. The union has also reached out to the ITF seeking support.“It is an accusation without arguments. This is a strange story started by the company (shipowner) to prevent or deter, workers from doing similar acts. We believe they chose Angola as a place known for corruption to be able to perform the move, but they chose the wrong crew.”The union further said, “the evidence clearly shows that there was no shortage of fuel on the ship, nor that there was a surplus of 104 cubic meters which could have been sold.”The two Croatian sailors along with other crew members, reportedly from the Philippines, Ukraine, and Russia, are not allowed to leave the country for the duration of the investigation. Angolan crew members have been released.Sonatide did not respond to Offshore Energy Today’s request for comment on the case.As for the vessel itself, the Sutton Tide’s latest AIS data show it is an operation, having recently left Total’s Pazflor field, offshore Angola.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Brisk walks fight prostate cancer

first_img Share Walks must be brisk to have an effect, the experts believeBy Michelle RobertsHealth reporter, BBC NewsMen who have been recently diagnosed with prostate cancer can help keep their disease at bay by taking brisk walks, claim researchers.Based on their observations, men who power walk for at least three hours a week can halve how much their cancer will grow and spread over the next couple of years.Strolling does not have the same effect, Cancer Research journal warns.Experts say it shows that keeping active can improve health.But they say the findings should be interpreted with caution because the men who did more walking also tended to be younger, leaner, and non-smokers, which could also explain some of the differences seen.Leg workThe University of California San Francisco study looked at the outcomes of 1,455 men, mostly in their 60s, who were diagnosed with “localised” prostate cancer, meaning it had not yet started to spread.The men were asked to say how much exercise and of what type they took in the average week. During the 31 months of follow up, the US researchers recorded 117 events, including disease recurrence, bone tumours and deaths specifically caused by prostate cancer.And they found that men who walked briskly for at least three hours a week were far less likely to have one of these events.The brisk walkers had a 57% rate of progression of disease than men who walked at an easy pace for less than three hours a week.Lead researcher Erin Richman said: “It appears that men who walk briskly after their diagnosis may delay or even prevent progression of their disease.“The benefit from walking truly depended on how quickly you walked. Walking at an easy pace did not seem to have any benefit.“Walking is something everyone can and should do to improve their health.”The scientists believe power walking might affect prostate cancer progression by changing blood levels of certain proteins that have been shown in the lab to encourage cancer growth.Dr. Helen Rippon, head of research management at The Prostate Cancer Charity, said: “Although this research will need to be repeated to make sure the results can be applied to all men with prostate cancer, we would certainly advise men diagnosed with prostate cancer to ensure that their lifestyle includes a good amount of physical activity – and walking is often the easiest way of achieving this.”Liz Woolf of Cancer Research UK said: “We know there are many benefits to exercise and that it can help people to recover more quickly after cancer treatment but it’s difficult to set specific levels of exercise as everyone’s needs and abilities are different.“Just to be safe, it is important that people with cancer check with their doctor before taking up any new form of exercise.” Sharing is caring! Share Sharecenter_img 18 Views   no discussions HealthLifestyle Brisk walks fight prostate cancer by: – May 24, 2011 Tweetlast_img read more

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Another hike in UK’s Air Passenger Duty

first_img Sharing is caring! Share St. John’s Antigua- Britain’s controversial Air Passenger Duty is being increased again, leaving industry bodies in the UK furious over the decision by chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne.The tax is one that continues to be heavily criticised by Antigua & Barbuda and the rest of the Caribbean, because of its alleged discriminatory nature and its negative impact on tourist destinations in the region.While the annual increase was widely expected, the government in London has been heavily criticised following an announcement during the Autumn Statement earlier on Wednesday.The Caribbean is continuing to lobby against a tax that some industry officials insist is also hurting the UK economy.Dale Keller, chief executive, Board of Airline Representatives in the UK, said the pre-Budget levels of APD could not be justified.He also argued that the latest increase takes Britain dangerously beyond the tipping point where the impact can only be negative to the economy.According to Keller, the announcement comes as unsurprising from a government that is not listening to the wider industry, or international opinion, and is self-destructive to its own objectives of attracting foreign investment and tourism.Osborne confirmed earlier that the tax on all long-haul flights and in premium cabins including those to the Caribbean will rise by £2 (EC$9) per passenger from April 2013.The levy on short-haul economy flights will remain at £13 (EC$56).The government has also introduced a new tax rate for private jets, which were previously exempt from APD.Passengers on flights with fewer than 19 seats will have to pay £52 or EC$225 to £376 or a little over EC$1,600, depending on the length of flight, again from April 2013.Antigua Observer LifestyleTravel Another hike in UK’s Air Passenger Duty by: – December 6, 2012 Sharecenter_img 51 Views   one comment Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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