Study finds alcoholic schizophrenics more violent

first_imgSchizophrenics who also abuse alcohol or drugs are four times as likely to commit a violent crime than the average person.In contrast, among those who are clean the risk is only 1.2 times the average.Dr Seena Fazel, researcher from Oxford’s Department of Psychiatry said, “we found that the risk of violent crime committed by people with schizophrenia is a lot lower than people might expect.”The findings suggest that substance abuse treatment may help control the rate of violent crime among schizophrenics. Currently, up to 5% of violent crimes in society are committed by schizophrenics, among whom 30-40% are alcoholics and 10-15% abuse drugs.last_img

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NAMB plans for busy conference schedule

first_imgThe National Association of Master Bakers (NAMB) has a raft of activities planned for its 122nd annual conference, taking place from 8-11 May at The Highcliff Marriott, Bournemouth.On Saturday 9 May, a golf tournament – The Neil Houliston Cup – will be played at the nearby Meyrick Park Golf Club. There is also a sightseeing boat trip around the coast for Association members. A Saturday night cocktail party will be followed by a four-course banquet meal, the presidential speech and music.Sunday morning kicks off with the AGM, followed by a panel of speakers: Kevin Kingsland, chartered psychologist, TSRi; Joe Hale, consultant, Dragon Brands; and David Powell, Master of the Worshipful Company. The afternoon will see the installation of president elect, Neil MacSymons, as well as a church service, presided over by Paul Jones of former 1960s rhythm and blues band Manfred Mann. And an evening cocktail party has The Wurzles as its theme, with music by tribute band The Mangled Wurzles.l For details, contact Karen Dear on 01920 860117.last_img read more

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Indiana Dunes, other state parks to resume collecting entrance fees

first_img Facebook Indiana Dunes, other state parks to resume collecting entrance fees By 95.3 MNC – May 8, 2020 0 457 WhatsApp Twitter Facebook CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews WhatsApp (“Indiana Dunes State Park – August 2014” by sheffieldb, CC BY 2.0) Turkey Run, Shades and Indiana Dunes state parks, and Deam Lake and Starve Hollow state recreation areas will resume collecting entrance fees on Saturday, May 9. All other DNR properties will resume charging entrance fees no later than May 15.Regarding other imminent changes:Equestrian and mountain bike trails will open, for day use only, on Monday, May 11. Day-use restrooms and vault toilets will open at DNR properties by May 15. Until then, guests should come prepared for restroom use to be restricted.Nature Centers and historic facilities in state parks properties will open the week of May 11; however, hours may be reduced, and social distancing may limit the number of guests allowed in the respective facility at one time.Marinas will open the week of May 11, with limited operations.The Fort Golf Course is open, and the golf pro shop at Fort Harrison State Park reopens the week of May 11, with self-service cart rental available with a limit of one person per cart.A complete status list for facilities and services at DNR properties is at on.IN.gov/dnrcovid19.Guests at DNR properties should remember the following when visiting:Practice social distancing at all times, particularly, as you hike, picnic or use boat ramps. Keep a minimum of 6 feet from other individuals you encounter, for your safety and theirs. Keep your group size small – fewer than 25 individuals is ideal.Bring your own drinking water and hand sanitizer.If you picnic, bring and use a covering for your picnic table and take it with you when you leave.If a parking lot is full, move to another location.If you feel sick or are running a temperature, plan a visit for a different day for the safety of other guests.A full breakdown of entrance and other fees is at stateparks.IN.gov/5062.htm. Pinterest Previous articleMichigan government working to make sure everyone behind on bills has water serviceNext articleConcern about keeping Hoosier workforce safe as businesses reopen 95.3 MNCNews/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel is your breaking news and weather station for northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan. Google+ Twitter Google+ Pinterestlast_img read more

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Another piece of cancer puzzle falls into place

first_imgAn international team of researchers has created a genome-scale map of 26 cancers, revealing more than 100 genomic sites where DNA from tumors is either missing or abnormally duplicated compared to normal tissues. The study, the largest of its kind, finds that most of these genetic abnormalities are not unique to one form of cancer, but are shared across multiple cancers.“Our findings show that many genome alterations are universal across different cancers. Although this has been known for some types of changes, the degree to which so many alterations are shared was pretty surprising to us,” said senior author Matthew Meyerson, a Harvard Medical School professor of pathology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and senior associate member of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. “It suggests that, in the future, a driving force behind cancer treatment will be common genomic alterations, rather than tumors’ tissue of origin.” The work appears in yesterday’s edition of the journal Nature.Cancers now are characterized largely by their symptoms: the organs in the body in which they first arise and the appearance of tumor cells under a microscope. Although this information is valuable, it fails to highlight cancers’ molecular underpinnings, which could be used in laboratories to discover new, more effective cancer therapies and in the clinic to improve diagnosis and treatment. A goal ofmodern biomedical research is to fill this knowledge gap and describe all cancers based on what drives them — that is, the genetic aberrations that initiate and maintain tumor growth.In 2004, a scientific team led by researchers at the Dana-Farber and the Broad Institute launched a project to map systematically the genetic changes across different cancers. They focused on a particular type of DNA change in which segments of a tumor’s genome are present in abnormal copies. Instead of the usual two copies, tumors often carry several copies of one piece of DNA (an “amplification”) or may lack it altogether (a “deletion”). These genetic abnormalities are known as somatic copy-number alterations, or SCNAs.Like other types of DNA mutations that litter the genomes of tumor cells, most SCNAs do not necessarily play a meaningful role in cancer growth. But the ones that do serve as important signposts, pointing to the specific genes contained within them that help to promote and maintain cancers. The challenge lies in distinguishing these so-called drivers from their less influential counterparts.As the foundation for their analysis, the scientists collected more than 2,500 cancer specimens representing more than two dozen cancer types, including lung, prostate, breast, ovarian, colon, esophageal, liver, brain, and blood cancers.“Studies like this require a large and diverse group of tumor specimens,” said first author Rameen Beroukhim, an assistant professor of medical oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a researcher at the Broad Institute. “We are deeply grateful to our collaborators and to their patients, who generously shared samples with us.”Using powerful genomic “chip” technologies, the researchers analyzed DNA from these samples, and combined their data with publicly available data from 600 more tumor samples to assemble a detailed catalogue of the SCNAs present in multiple tumor types. They found that the most common SCNAs tend to come in two sizes: relatively long, about the length of an entire chromosome or a single chromosome arm, and short, with an average size of about 1.8 million genetic letters, or 0.03 percent of the entire human genome.The researchers focused their attention on the short, or focal, SCNAs which, due to their relatively compact size, can ease the task of pinpointing important cancer genes.“Until recently, the analytic methods needed to support this kind of analysis were not available,” said first author Craig Mermel, a physician and Ph.D. student working in Meyerson’s laboratory and at the Broad Institute. “New advances by our group as well as many others have now made it feasible to systematically map genomic changes across thousands of samples and at high resolution.”Of the 150 or so focal SCNAs they identified, Meyerson and his colleagues noticed that the majority did not coincide with genes already known to be amplified or deleted in cancer. Looking more closely at the genes that normally reside in these regions, the researchers found an enrichment of genes with important biological functions in cancer, such as cell death, or “apoptosis.”This analysis helped to shed light on two genes, MCL1 and BCL2L1. Cancer cells with amplifications of these genes appear to rely on the genes’ activity for survival, suggesting important roles in maintaining tumor growth.Perhaps most importantly, looking across the data for the various cancers, it became clear that most focal SCNAs are not unique to just one type of cancer, but are shared among multiple tumor types. In an analysis of 17 cancer types, the researchers found that most amplifications and deletions are present in more than one type. That suggests the genetic mechanisms that underlie these tumors are shared among them, and could someday lead to common strategies for treating them.“These data signify an important resource for cancer gene discovery, but they’re only a first step,” said Meyerson. “With the ongoing revolution in genome technology, it will become possible to decode the genomes of thousands of cancers to reveal every genomic change.”The Nature study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Sarah Thomas Monopoli Lung Cancer Research Fund, the Seaman Corporation Fund for Lung Cancer Research, and the Lucas Foundation.last_img read more

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Champlain College award goes to General Rainville and Vermont National Guard

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–At Champlain College’s Commencement Ceremony on May 7, the College presented its Distinguished Citizen Award to Major General Martha T. Rainville –the Adjutant General of the State of Vermont–and the members of the Vermont National Guard.The ceremony was presided over by the chair of the Champlains Board of Trustees, William G. Post, Jr., and President Dr. Roger H. Perry, who delivered the Commencement Address and will retire at the end of June. Post said the awardees have collectively demonstrated tremendous leadership skills and community service, both in and outside of the Guard.When Champlains trustees met to discuss this years recipients, these were some of the words that were shared: Dignity, service and caring, Post said.Champlain College Trustee Bill Cody recently retired from the Army National Guard and he said, The Vermont Guard has served our country and our state above and beyond the call of duty. And Marthas care and concern for the welfare of the soldiers, air men and women, and their families are unsurpassed.Post said General Rainville has handled an important and sensitive job with grace and dignity in a very difficult timea time when soldiers have been deployed for active duty in the Middle East and other parts of the world. The efforts of the Guard and the General have been noticed across the state and on the national level. U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy said, Adjutant General Martha Rainville has been a superb leader during an especially difficult time for members of the Vermont National Guard and their families. He has said the Guard embodies the spirit of service that has always been a hallmark of Vermonters.Members of the Guard stand ready to assist Vermonters in times of need, Post said. They also make their mark as distinguished citizens by being involved in many civilian and community organizations, and General Rainville exemplifies that trait. Rainville has been involved in St. Albans town government, the Northwestern Medical Center, the American Heart Association, District 6 Environmental Commission, Vermont Veterans Home, and in her church.General Rainville oversees 4,000 members of the Vermont Army and Air National Guard and she manages a budget of $115 million.last_img read more

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Deer Park Man Charged With Manslaughter

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A suspect was arrested for stabbing a 25-year-old Brentwood man to death near the suspect’s Deer Park home this week, Suffolk County police said.Christopher Chavez, 21, was charged with first-degree manslaughter.Homicide Squad detectives said Chavez fatally stabbed Marlon Velasquez on Old Country Road in Deer Park on Thursday.The victim was pronounced dead at the scene. Investigators believe he was killed several hours before his body was found.Chavez will be arraigned Saturday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img

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Freddie Ljungberg explains why Nicolas Pepe was axed for Arsenal’s draw against Norwich City

first_imgFreddie Ljungberg explains why Nicolas Pepe was axed for Arsenal’s draw against Norwich City Nicolas Pepe was left on the bench against Norwich City (AP Photo)‘I’ve looked, of course. I’ve been here [in the first team] for three months, last year I was the manager of the Under-23s, so I saw every game of the first team.‘So of course, I have an opinion about how we can play and players.‘But I try to see it just like that, everybody has a fair chance.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘What I see in training and games, that’s what I’m going to judge it on.When asked directly about Pepe’s omission against Norwich, Ljungberg replied: ‘Pepe’s a very good player.‘But like I said, I try to look at what’s being done in training and what I see every day, and that’s how I judge it.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Comment Advertisement Freddie Ljungberg took charge of his first game as Arsenal drew with Norwich City (PA Wire)Freddie Ljungberg insists Nicolas Pepe will be given a ‘fair chance’ to win back his place in Arsenal’s side after he was benched for the 2-2 draw against Norwich City on Sunday.Ljungberg took charge of his first game after replacing Unai Emery as Arsenal’s interim manager earlier this week.The Gunners went behind on two occasions at Carrow Road but Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang netted twice to salvage a draw.Meanwhile, Pepe was left on the bench as Ljungberg opted to bring on Bukayo Saka and Gabriel Martinelli as his attacking substitutions in the second half.ADVERTISEMENTBut Ljungberg says Arsenal’s £72 million summer signing will get his chance following Emery’s departure.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘I haven’t had that word with them but for me that’s how it works,’ Ljungberg said after Arsenal’s draw against Norwich. Metro Sport ReporterSunday 1 Dec 2019 6:17 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.6kShares Advertisementlast_img read more

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Lancashire, London pension funds get go-ahead for partnership

first_imgThe Lancashire County Pension Fund (LCPF) and the London Pensions Fund Authority (LPFA) will push ahead with their partnership after both boards approved the plans.The local government pension schemes (LGPS), situated some 230 miles apart, will now create a so-called asset liability management partnership, to be known as the Lancashire and London Pensions Partnership (LLPP).With combined assets of £10.5bn (€14.8bn), the pair will maintain separate governance structures, with oversight boards in both London and Preston, but merge investments, liability management and administration.Negotiation with asset managers on fee reduction will begin as the pair merge mandates and look to save £32m within five years. The pair said its structure was set up to allow other schemes to join.They will also aim to set up an asset pool, authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), by April 2016.Susan Martin, chief executive at the £4.8bn LPFA, said the partnership was another step to towards reducing LGPS costs, in addition to other measures such as the London funds’ collective investment vehicle – which is also looking to merge mandates.Cost has been an increasing focus within the local government sector as schemes await central government plans on whether to force passive investments-only for listed assets.The £32m in savings would come from renegotiations with asset managers, moving some asset management in-house, direct investments and merging the back office.Lancashire has just over half of its assets with 12 external managers, while the LPFA uses 38 managers for a significant majority of its assets.The London scheme paid £32.8m in investment manager fees, with £495,000 for its in-house team, in 2013-14. Lancashire spent £11.3m.LLPP said the location of investment and administration functions would remain split between London and Preston but over time would shift between the two.The chief executive and CIO positions will be decided on once a non-executive board is in place and the partnership wins FCA authorisation.George Graham, director of the £5.7bn Lancashire scheme, said it would depend on the business model as the venture develops.He added that the efficiencies envisaged did not necessarily entail job losses.“The people who will suffer in terms of [the partnership] are not necessarily our staff but our fund managers through the renegotiating of fees,” he said. “We have sound figures we are confident of.”Martin said both schemes were keen to provide a better value-for-money proposition for its members and sponsoring employers – and that the scale would make this easier.“If an organisation wants to reduce costs, it is about ensuring efficient processes,” she said.“This means doing it in-house when you have the scale and expertise and [merging] back-office processes.”Both schemes currently have in-house asset management teams, with the LPFA known for its focus on equities and Lancashire for its focus on infrastructure.The LLPP said it expected investment teams at both schemes to grow as a result of the partnership, given their complementary nature.It also has no intention of bringing all of its assets in-house.“The partnership is between Lancashire and London, but also about collaboration between our suppliers like external fund managers,” Martin added. “We are not saying we’re going to do everything in-house, and we are looking to continue relationships with a partnership approach.”last_img read more

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Gold Coast beach house on Hedges Ave hits market with almost $10 million price tag

first_imgThe Mermaid Beach property at 111 Hedges Ave has hit the market with an almost $10 million asking price.A BEACHFRONT home on the Gold Coast’s illustrious Millionaires’ Row has hit the market with a jaw-dropping price tag.The six-bedroom house at 111 Hedges Ave belongs to Queensland shop-fitting industry figure Scott Headland, who wants $9.95 million for the property.Known as ‘Little Dune’, Mr Headland said the house offered an incredible lifestyle.“I think you just can’t beat waking up to the sound and the sight of the waves crashing onto the beach, it is just fantastic,” he said.It belongs to Queensland shop-fitting industry figure Scott Headland.A bar is one of its highlights.The two-storey home, which is on a 769sq m block with 19m of beach frontage, features an 18m lap pool, spa, gym, home office, kids’ retreat and a bar.John Henderson Professionals Mermaid Beach partner Luke Henderson said the rare beachfront offering would attract well-heeled buyers and wasn’t likely to last long on the market.MORE NEWS: New top sale notched for CoastMORE NEWS: More Coast properties selling at a profit“Properties like Little Dune come onto the market infrequently and there are always savvy buyers siting on the sidelines waiting to snap up beachfront homes like this one,’’ he said.“With real estate, the truism is that it is all about location, location, location and being able to buy a large property on the absolute beachfront at Mermaid Beach … is as good as it gets.”Check out that view!Mr Headland has owned it for the past 17 years.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoMr Henderson said it was ideal for a large family who wanted to enjoy beachfront living at its best.“The home offers uninterrupted ocean views, it has indoor-outdoor entertaining areasupstairs and downstairs, there is a lap pool and the beach is at your back door,’’ he said.“It would also be a haven for car enthusiasts because there is a four-car garage and plentyof room for more vehicles to be securely stored on the property.”Property records show Mr Headland bought the house in 2002 for $6 million.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:27Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:27 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy Spring 2019 is a good time to sell01:27last_img read more

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