Junior Raiders Football Sign-Ups

first_imgSign Up for Jr. Raiders Football Football Season is back! The Junior Raiders are registering players for the 2018 season. The Jr. Raiders play in a weighted league and stress safety first for all their players. The teams are divided up in to:Varsity 7th & 8th GradersJunior Varsity 5th and 6th GradersPee Wee 3rd and 4th Graders New this year, the Junior Raiders have a Fall Flag Football team for players in grades K-2. You can register online at www.ocjryf.siplay.com For more information call or text:Carl Wanek at 609-513-5517orKen Wisnefski at 609-802-3415last_img

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Report Food wastage survey: Brits are most likely to waste bread

first_imgA survey carried out for Waitrose has found that the average person in the UK bins around £400-worth of perishables per year, while more than half of those polled (56%) admitted to throwing away bread every week.Other perishables frequently thrown away each week were bananas (32%); bagged salads (30%); cold meats (18%); and milk (17%)Those living in Brighton were found to be the worst offenders when it came to binning uneaten food on a daily basis, with 16.67% admitting to it, compared to 12.87% of those living in London. The survey, taken this month by Onepoll, revealed that Chelmsford in Essex was best, with only 2% of its residents throwing away food daily. Over 14% of Oxford’s residents bin food each day, compared to 13% in Wrexham, 6.94% in Cambridge, and 5.36% in Norwich.Despite the high percentage of food wastage, the survey found that over 60% of Brits take leftovers to work for lunch the next day, and over 92% reuse shopping bags. Over 73% of those questioned also said they felt guilty about throwing away gone-off food.Waitrose announced the results of the survey to raise awareness of HRH The Prince of Wales’ new Start initiative to encourage Brits to live a more sustainable way of life.last_img read more

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Press release: Foreign Secretary travels to the Gulf to push for end to Yemen bloodshed

first_imgIn the Gulf he will meet King Salman of Saudi Arabia, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia, Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan of Abu Dhabi, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir, United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Yemeni Vice President Ali Mohsen and Yemeni Foreign Minister Khaled Al Yamani. The Foreign Secretary is seeking to build support among international, and particularly regional, partners for new action in the UN Security Council to bolster the UN-led peace process, following his meeting with UN Special Envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths at the end of October.The Foreign Secretary will be the first UK Minister to visit Saudi Arabia since the murder of Jamal Khashoggi one month ago. He will use his meetings to make clear the importance of Saudi Arabia cooperating with Turkey to conduct a full and credible investigation into Mr Khashoggi’s death. This will build on talks that the Permanent Under-Secretary at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Simon McDonald, also had this weekend in Saudi Arabia with King Salman of Saudi Arabia and Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir.While in the UAE the Foreign Secretary will also raise the ongoing consular case of Matthew Hedges.Speaking ahead of his visit Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said: For journalists Further information Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn Media enquiries In addition, he will call on the Saudi authorities to do more to deliver justice and accountability for the Khashoggi family: Follow the Foreign Office on Twitter @foreignoffice and Facebook The international community remain united in horror and outrage at the brutal murder of Jamal Khashoggi one month ago. It is clearly unacceptable that the full circumstances behind his murder still remain unclear. We encourage the Saudi authorities to co-operate fully with the Turkish investigation into his death, so that we deliver justice for his family and the watching world. The human cost of war in Yemen is incalculable: with millions displaced, famine and disease rife and years of bloodshed, the only solution is now a political decision to set aside arms and pursue peace. Britain has a unique position, both as pen-holder at the UN Security Council and as a key influencer in the region, so today I am travelling to the Gulf to demand that all sides commit to this process. We are witnessing a man-made humanitarian catastrophe on our watch: now is the window to make a difference, and to get behind both the UN peace process and current UK efforts in the Security Council. Follow the Foreign Secretary on Twitter @Jeremy_Hunt and Facebook Email [email protected]last_img read more

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Speech: PM’s statement on exiting the European Union: 10 December 2018

first_imgMr Speaker, with permission I would like to make a statement on Exiting the European Union.We have now had three days of debate on the Withdrawal Agreement setting out the terms of our departure from the EU and the Political Declaration setting out our future relationship after we have left.I have listened very carefully to what has been said, in this chamber and out of it, by members from all sides.From listening to those views it is clear that while there is broad support for many of the key aspects of the deal, on one issue – the Northern Ireland backstop – there remains widespread and deep concern.As a result, if we went ahead and held the vote tomorrow the deal would be rejected by a significant margin.We will therefore defer the vote scheduled for tomorrow and not proceed to divide the House at this time.I set out in my speech opening the debate last week the reasons why the backstop is a necessary guarantee to the people of Northern Ireland and why – whatever future relationship you want – there is no deal available that does not include the backstop.Behind all those arguments are some inescapable facts.The fact that Northern Ireland shares a land border with another sovereign state.The fact that the hard-won peace that has been built in Northern Ireland over the last two decades has been built around a seamless border.And the fact that Brexit will create a wholly new situation: on 30 March the Northern Ireland/Ireland border will for the first time become the external frontier of the European Union’s single market and customs union.The challenge this poses must be met not with rhetoric but with real and workable solutions.Businesses operate across that border. People live their lives crossing and re-crossing it every day.I have been there and spoken to some of those people. They do not want their everyday lives to change as a result of the decision we have taken. They do not want a return to a hard border.And if this House cares about preserving our Union, it must listen to those people, because our Union will only endure with their consent.We had hoped that the changes we have secured to the backstop would reassure Members that we could never be trapped in it indefinitely.I hope the House will forgive me if I take a moment to remind it of those changes.The customs element of the backstop is now UK-wide. It no longer splits our country into two customs territories. This also means that the backstop is now an uncomfortable arrangement for the EU, so they won’t want it to come into use, or persist for long if it does.Both sides are now legally committed to using best endeavours to have our new relationship in place before the end of the implementation period, ensuring the backstop is never used.If our new relationship isn’t ready, we can now choose to extend the implementation period, further reducing the likelihood of the backstop coming into use.If the backstop ever does come into use, we now don’t have to get the new relationship in place to get out of it. Alternative arrangements that make use of technology could be put in place instead.The treaty is now clear that the backstop can only ever be temporary.And there is now a termination clause.But I am clear from what I have heard in this place and from my own conversations that these elements do not offer a sufficient number of colleagues the reassurance that they need.I spoke to a number of EU leaders over the weekend, and in advance of the European Council I will go to see my counterparts in other member states and the leadership of the Council and the Commission.I will discuss with them the clear concerns that this House has expressed.We are also looking closely at new ways of empowering the House of Commons to ensure that any provision for a backstop has democratic legitimacy and to enable the House to place its own obligations on the government to ensure that the backstop cannot be in place indefinitely.Mr Speaker, having spent the best part of two years poring over the detail of Brexit, listening to the public’s ambitions, and yes, their fears too, and testing the limits of what the other side is prepared to accept, I am in absolutely no doubt that this deal is the right one.It honours the result of the referendum. It protects jobs, security and our Union. But it also represents the very best deal that is actually negotiable with the EU.I believe in it – as do many Members of this House. And I still believe there is a majority to be won in this House in support of it, if I can secure additional reassurance on the question of the backstop.And that is what my focus will be in the days ahead.But Mr Speaker, if you take a step back, it is clear that this House faces a much more fundamental question.Does this House want to deliver Brexit? And if it does, does it want to do so through reaching an agreement with the EU?If the answer is yes, and I believe that is the answer of the majority of this House, then we all have to ask ourselves whether we are prepared to make a compromise.Because there will be no enduring and successful Brexit without some compromise on both sides of the debate.Many of the most controversial aspects of this deal – including the backstop – are simply inescapable facts of having a negotiated Brexit.Those members who continue to disagree need to shoulder the responsibility of advocating an alternative solution that can be delivered.And do so without ducking its implications.So if you want a second referendum to overturn the result of the first, be honest that this risks dividing the country again, when as a House we should be striving to bring it back together.If you want to remain part of the Single Market and the Customs Union, be open that this would require free movement, rule-taking across the economy, and ongoing financial contributions – none of which are in my view compatible with the result of the referendum.If you want to leave without a deal, be upfront that in the short term, this would cause significant economic damage to parts of our country who can least afford to bear the burden.I do not believe that any of those courses of action command a majority in this House.But notwithstanding that fact, for as long as we fail to agree a deal, the risk of an accidental no deal increases.So the government will step up its work in preparation for that potential outcome and the Cabinet will hold further discussions on it this week.The vast majority of us, Mr Speaker, accept the result of the referendum, and want to leave with a deal. We have a responsibility to discharge.If we will the ends, we must also will the means.I know that members across the House appreciate how important that responsibility is.And I am very grateful to all members – on this side of the House and a few on the other side too – who have backed this deal and spoken up for it.Many others, I know, have been wrestling with their consciences, particularly over the question of the backstop: seized of the need to face-up to the challenge posed by the Irish border, but genuinely concerned about the consequences.I have listened. I have heard those concerns and I will now do everything I possibly can to secure further assurances.If I may conclude on a personal note, Mr Speaker.On the morning after the referendum two and a half years ago, I knew that we had witnessed a defining moment for our democracy.Places that didn’t get a lot of attention at elections and which did not get much coverage on the news were making their voices heard and saying that they wanted things to change.I knew in that moment that Parliament had to deliver for them.But of course that does not just mean delivering Brexit. It means working across all areas – building a stronger economy, improving public services, tackling social injustices – to make this a country that truly works for everyone, a country where nowhere and nobody is left behind.And these matters are too important to be afterthoughts in our politics – they deserve to be at the centre of our thinking.But that can only happen if we get Brexit done and get it done right.And even though I voted Remain, from the moment I took up the responsibility of being Prime Minister of this great country I have known that my duty is to honour the result of that vote.And I have been just as determined to protect the jobs that put food on the tables of working families and the security partnerships that keep each one of us safe.And that is what this deal does. It gives us control of our borders, our money and our laws. It protects jobs, security and our Union. It is the right deal for Britain.I am determined to do all I can to secure the reassurances this House requires, to get this deal over the line and deliver for the British people.And I commend this statement to the House.last_img read more

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Stop the Week: online

first_imgWe look at deep-fried cake, baking with alcohol and why the fish finger sandwich will never die in our tongue-in-cheek Stop the Week. Embrace the delights of youthYou’re never too good for a fish finger sandwich. While not the pinnacle of culinary genius, they are rather tasty, and revered Masterchef judge Greg Wallace has announced himself a true fish finger sandwich advocate.Despite having eaten some of the finest foods ever cooked, the chef told BANG Showbiz that he loves both fish finger sandwiches and McDonald’s Big Macs “just as much” as the meals he eats as a food critic.He told the title: “What’s wrong with a Big Mac? Of course it’s delicious, otherwise there wouldn’t be hundreds of thousands of McDonald’s all over the world. Of course it’s delicious. It’s people who don’t know their food and say, ‘Oh I wouldn’t expect to see you in there’.“It’s nonsense snobbery. A fish finger sandwich is a completely delicious thing. Everyone knows it. You can enjoy a roast quail and still enjoy a Big Mac and fish finger sandwich. You can really enjoy a £150 bottle of wine, and still like lager. I’ve never really understood.”We wonder if any dish is beneath his notice – a chip butty or deep-fried Mars Bar perhaps?Banging bakesOf course, music is inspiring in general, but we’re not clear on how specific tracks translate to food. Somebody has figured it out, though, because Bake in Black is a rock music-inspired baking book, featuring an eclectic collection of 58 rock music-inspired cake and dessert recipes to make at home.It began life as a blog in authors’ Eve and Dave O’Sullivan’s East London flat. The couple, funnily enough, hail from backgrounds of journalism and food styling (Eve) and music (Dave) – so why not write a book on food and music?Both hard rock and heavy metal fans, as well as being into baking, the pair wanted to show the “natural partnership” between food and music. Bake in Black (a pun on the classic AC/DC song ‘Back in Black’) is divided into six musical chapters, each featuring a different type of bake, each inspired by songs of classic rock and heavy metal brands.Look out for signature bakes, including ‘Battenburg out of hell’ (Meatloaf), ‘God Save the Cream’ (Sex Pistols) and ‘Rock the Cake Bars’ (The Clash).Could this be the start of a whole series, each dedicated to a different genre of music or style of cooking? There could be mileage in this.Bake is Black is published by The Flood Gallery and distributed by Omnibus Press and available to purchase now from The Flood Gallery Publishing website and Amazon priced £14.99 (RRP).Fry awayTrendy Shoreditch’s trendy Boxpark area has welcomed a new wacky pop-up by the equally trendy hashtagged name of #FryHard. Chef Jim Thomlinson seems to like a bit of deep-fried food and there is no end to what he’ll pop in his fryer. The tried-and-tested include Cadbury Creme Eggs, cakes, pizza and cheese strings.If that were not enough of a health scare, Thomlinson will also be selling something called the ‘Fully Fried Easter’. You’d be right to quiver in fear – it consists of a whole fried lamb joint, roast potatoes, rosemary, carrots and sprouts. It can serve up to six people and needs to be booked in advance.The menu isn’t set and is on offer from 2 to 5 April. Customers can suggest items they’d like to see fried via Facebook and Twitter. Suggestions have included Gummy Bears, Jaffa Cakes and even haggis.I think this is a case of ‘each to their own’.Bake your shot of alcoholWe all know the negative health impact of alcohol, so The Daily Meal suggests baking with it instead of drinking it – get your hit of alcohol with less damaging consequences. While the logic may be flawed, the products are delicious.Alcohol-soaked foods such as pickles, whipped cream and cupcakes are already in existence and means bakers can make things like ice cream sandwiches and alcoholic Oreos. The benefits of alcohol in bakery include lengthening the life of the cake and bringing out flavours. For example, coffee liqueur will being out the cocoa of chocolate cake.It has been popular since the 19th century and they do say ‘listen to your elders’.Bakers are encouraged to stay out of the kitchen while intoxicated, however.last_img read more

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Southern favorite

first_imgPlant heavy, thin laterRutabagas can be planted in rows 14 to 18 inches apart. Soil should be worked well to form a good seedbed and fertilizer incorporated thoroughly. Seed should be planted half an inch deep with about 4 inches between plants. “Your initial seeding can be closer and then the plants can be thinned to a stand of 4 inches between plants,” Kelley said.Rutabagas require an abundant supply of moisture to insure best yields and highest quality. Most soils will require 1.5 inches of water every 7 to 10 days.Rutabagas are harvested when roots are 4 or 5 inches in diameter. The roots should be topped, washed free of soil and dried quickly. To top, remove the leaves from the fleshy root. As far as good eats go, the rutabaga ranks up there with the collard green and black-eyed pea to most Southerners. If you like the tuberous treat, now is the time to plant it, says a University of Georgia horticulturist.“Similar to turnips, rutabagas are often called table turnips in Northern areas and Canada,” said Terry Kelley, a horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “The roots are often longer than turnips and have a thick, leafy neck.”It can be grown in both spring and fall. But it has its best root growth during cool weather, around the 60 F to 65 F range, he said, but can take temperatures as low as 40 F. Two varieties best for GeorgiaThe most popular varieties grown in Georgia are the American Purple Top and the Laurentian. American Purple Top has a deep purple crown, a globe-shaped root, yellow flesh and is yellow below the crown. The leaves of this variety are blue-green. The root grows 5 to 6 inches in diameter and takes 90 days to mature.Laurentian has a purple crown, a globe-shaped root, yellow flesh and is light yellow below the crown. The leaves of this variety are medium blue-green. The root can grow to 5 and a half inches in diameter and takes 90 days to mature.Plant deep and before frostRutabagas should be seeded 10 to 12 weeks before a heavy frost, he said. North Georgians should set plants by Sept. 15, he said. South Georgians have until Oct. 1 to get their plants set.The root crop grows best in moderately deep, highly fertile, well-drained soil with a pH 6.2 to 6.8. A general recommendation for rutabagas is two to five pounds of 10-10-10 fertilizer per 100 square feet, he said. Lower rates should be used on heavier or sandier soils. “To determine whether you need to fertilize, you should first have your soil tested through your local UGA Cooperative Extension office,” Kelley said. “Fertilizer applications should be based on the soil test’s recommendations.”Once you have determined your fertilizer rate, apply half at planting and half four weeks later, he said.last_img read more

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New center at Champlain College named for S.D. Ireland Family

first_imgAt a dedication event held on campus on September 17, Champlain College announced its newest academic facility will be named after the S.D. Ireland family, owner of S.D. Ireland Concrete Construction Corp. of Burlington, Vt. The $10 million, state-of-the-art building will be called The S.D. Ireland Family Center for Global Business and Technology.At the center of a major gift to the College are Shelburne, Vt., residents Scott D. Ireland and his wife Kimberly (Wilson) Ireland, who is a 1985 graduate of Champlain College. They were joined by their three children S. Dylan, Shea and Sophie, parents Margaret and Stuart D. Ireland, and brother Stephen D. Ireland at the dedication of the new facility.With three young children, we have a strong interest in education, said Scott D. Ireland. We also like to be associated with cutting-edge initiatives-thats why we wanted to support Champlain College.The Irelands gift of an undisclosed amount, per the wishes of the family, helps fund an academic center that enhances Champlains ability to put students to work on real business and technology projects. The facility includes a market research and strategy room, international business resource center and focus group room, as well as multimedia suites, faculty offices, computer classrooms, and conference rooms.We are so pleased with the Ireland familys generous gift, said Champlain President Dr. Roger H. Perry. Its vitally important to have local support, and were grateful that the Irelands have invested in the future of our institution, which is linked so tightly to Vermont businesses and families.The two organizations share a common goal of creating strong foundations. While Champlain provides solid educational and career footing for many Vermonters, the Irelands have been creating the foundations upon which thousands of family homes and businesses are built, Perry said.This gift brings Champlains Power of Three capital campaign to within $500,000 of its $12 million goal. The campaign supports the construction of three new buildings totaling $31 million: the Center for Global Business and Technology, the Student Life Complex, and the Main Street Suites and Conference Center.We like to support local endeavors, said Kimberly Ireland. Ive seen a wonderful transformation at Champlain College, and I value the professional education I received at the College. The Ireland family has also been supporting cancer research at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. In 1999, they made a $2 million donation to create an endowed professorship at the college. Theyve also created the S.D. Ireland Cancer Research Fund to directly fund the work of UVM cancer researcher Dr. David Krag. Scott D. Ireland has been fighting skin cancer since 1990.S.D. Ireland Concrete Construction is a true family business, encompassing several members of the Ireland family over the years. The company was founded by Stuart D. Ireland in 1972, and his wife Margaret has worked as the treasurer for the business. Their sons Scott D. and Stephen D. Ireland now run the company as president and vice president, respectively, and their daughter Sherrill has also worked in the business. Scotts wife Kimberly has performed human resources and accounting functions in the office, as well, and their three young children are regular visitors to the Grove Street headquarters in Burlington.Stuart D. and Margaret Ireland moved from Rhode Island to Stowe, Vt., in the mid-1960s, where they built and operated the Town & Country Motor Lodge. Stuart developed a residential building company, bought property in Burlington from a defunct concrete company, and set up new concrete batch mixing equipment.S.D. Irelands commercial building business increased as the two sons grew up working in the family business. In fact, the foundation of Champlains Center for Global Business and Technology is made of S.D. Ireland concrete.The company earned a Bronze Award for Best Commercial Development in 2003 from the Home Builders and Remodelers Association of Northern Vermont (HBRA) for their work on the Interstate 89 rest stops in Williston, Vt. In addition, Stuart D. Ireland was honored with the 2000 HBRA Lifetime Achievement Award for a lifetime of dedication to the building profession.last_img read more

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Mount Snow Completes Sale of Haystack

first_imgMount Snow Completes Sale of HaystackMOUNT SNOW, VERMONT – June 30, 2005 – Mount Snow Ltd. has announced thatit has completed the sale of Haystack Ski Resort in Wilmington, Vermont toagroup of local businesspersons known collectively as Tyringham Ridge.This is great news for community residents and businesses, said StanHansen, President and Managing Director of Mount Snow Ltd. Were hopingthat this investment triggers further investment within our Valley.Entered into on March 30, the Purchase and Sale Agreement provided for a$5,000,000 purchase price and included a two year right of first refusaloncertain non-operational lands owned by Mount Snow.This transaction allows us to fully concentrate our efforts on MountSnow,while encouraging Haystack to realize its full potential, commentedHansen.The synergy were working towards achieving is exciting.Under the terms of the agreement, Mount Snow Ltd. will continue to drawwater from sources at Haystack.Proceeds to Mount Snow Ltd. and American Skiing Company from the sale ofHaystack are expected to be used for additional liquidity, to fundcapitalexpenditures and reduce senior debt, each as permitted under AmericanSkiingCompanys senior credit facilities.###last_img read more

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5 Favorite Trailheads Accessible Without a Vehicle

first_imgIn the age of Uber, it’s easier than ever to get around without your own set of wheels, but reaching some far-flung outdoor destinations still presents a challenge for carless adventurers. With a little research and creativity, however, you can still get out and about. Check out these options for a few regional public lands you can visit without a car.WEST VIRGINIA  |  Harpers Ferry National Historical ParkIt’s no coincidence that this town at the intersection of two rivers also serves as a crossroads of transportation, which makes it super simple to access. Each day, Amtrak’s Capitol Limited route stops at the Harpers Ferry station en route from Washington, D.C. and Chicago, and the train offers walk-on bike service as well as educational opportunities about the region’s natural and cultural heritage through the National Park Service’s Trails & Rails program. On weekdays, the MARC Train’s Brunswick Line stops in Harpers Ferry as it travels between D.C and Martinsburg, West Virginia. A park shuttle bus connects the Lower Town with the park’s Visitor Center. A short walk from these access points will connect you to multiple trails (including the Appalachian Trail) as well as adventure guide companies that offer rafting, tubing, kayaking, zip lining, and mountain biking.MARYLAND  |  Assateague State Park and Assateague Island National SeashoreGreyhound offers bus service to Ocean City, Maryland, and a short Uber or taxi ride from there gets you to either Assateague State Park or Assateague Island National Seashore. Both sections of the island offer campsites, swimming beaches, crabbing and fishing sites, nature trails, and feral horses meander throughout. Consider renting a bike in Ocean City (they’re an expensive hassle to transport by Greyhound) so you can explore more of the island.VIRGINIA  |  The Blue Ridge Parkway and Roanoke’s Mill Mountain Park and Explore ParkRoanoke’s greenways and its placement along the Blue Ridge Parkway make the city an ideal starting point for a variety of outdoor adventures, and since both Amtrak and Greyhound offer bus service to Roanoke, it’s a great option for a weekend getaway from urban centers throughout the region. Several bike shops in town offer rentals, and walkers and bikers alike can take the Mill Mountain Greenway from downtown Roanoke to Mill Mountain Park, which features the city’s iconic star. This 568-acre regional park also offers 10 miles of multiuse trails, a zoo, a wildflower garden, a playground, picnic sites, a discovery center, two overlooks that provide spectacular views of the city.The Roanoke River Greenway hugs the river on the south side of the city and terminates before it reaches Explore Park, but by continuing along neighborhood streets in the city’s Rosewood Park neighborhood, visitors can access Explore Park’s 1,100 acres, 14 miles of trails, and Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor’s Center. The park is located at milepost 115 on the Blue Ridge Parkway, which dedicated cyclists can also access from downtown Roanoke via virtually any major road heading east or south out of the city.SOUTH CAROLINA  |  Sesquicentennial State ParkAmtrak serves downtown Columbia, and citybound nature seekers can then walk a few short blocks to catch the city’s Comet 55x bus toward Sesquicentennial State Park. The bus stops at Wal-Mart on Columbia’s Two Notch Road, and parkgoers can then walk or catch a taxi/Uber for the last two miles into the heart of the park. Sesquicentennial sprawls for more than 1,400 acres under the canopy of a pine forest and features 84 campsites, 12 miles of hiking trails, a six-mile bike loop, a dog park (although dogs are not permitted on Columbia city buses), a sand volleyball court, a softball field, two playgrounds, geocaches, and picnic shelters. Additionally, the park offers kayaks, canoes, fishing boats, pedal boats and stand-up paddleboards for rent.GEORGIA  |  Chattahoochee River National Recreation AreaThe Chattahoochee River meanders just a few miles north and west of downtown Atlanta, creating plenty of access points, but watercraft rentals and shuttles take a bit more planning. Greyhound and Amtrak both have stations in downtown Atlanta, and once there, river runners can take the MARTA’s Red Line train to North Springs, then transfer to Bus 85 and get off at the first stop (Dunwoody Place). From there, a 20-minute walk will get you to Shoot the Hooch, an outfitter and guiding company that offers half- and full-day rentals and guided trips to get you rafting, tubing, kayaking, canoeing, or stand-up paddleboarding on the Chattahoochee.last_img read more

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Betrayal and Strategy Enabled FARC Leader’s Death in Colombia

first_img Betrayal by some of his trusted men, attracted by millions in reward money, and intelligence work with high-tech equipment were decisive in the success of the operation in which the military chief of the Colombian FARC guerrilla group died. Colombian defense minister Rodrigo Rivera said on 24 September that the death of Jorge Briceño Suárez, better known as “El Mono Jojoy,” demonstrates that the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) are crumbling from within. “Jojoy was handed over by his people,” affirmed Rivera, who insisted that the guerrilla group is suffering a process of disintegration due to its fighters’ weariness in the face of pressure from the armed forces and their poor living conditions in the middle of the jungle, including ill-treatment by their commanders. The death of “El Mono Jojoy” during “Operation Sodom,” as it was named, is considered by President Juan Manuel Santos’s administration to be the heaviest blow struck against the FARC in their entire history. Around four hundred military personnel supported by 25 helicopters and 30 airplanes participated in the operation, which began Wednesday with a bombardment of the guerrilla leader’s camp in the middle of the jungle, in a rural area of the municipality of La Macarena, in the department of El Meta, around 250 kilometers southeast of Bogotá. The Colombian government was offering a reward of 2.7 million dollars for information that would enable the location of the rebel leader, considered by the armed forces to be the bloodiest guerrilla and the one most feared by peasants in a wide region of the country. LENGTHY POLICE RECORD The guerrilla commander, fifty-nine years old and known for wearing a black beret and a camouflage uniform and always carrying a rifle, was accused of directing attacks on towns and military barracks and of murders, massacres, and kidnappings during the long internal conflict. He controlled the FARC areas in the east and south of the country. There were 60 arrest warrants pending against him, 12 measures freezing his assets, 5 convictions, 25 investigations for the crimes of rebellion, homicide, kidnapping, and terrorism, and at least 2 extradition requests. The defense minister announced that there will be new operations against other FARC leaders, whom he invited to turn themselves in so that they do not end up like Jojoy. “The FARC are arriving at a kind of turning point; we’ve struck them in their strategic heart, and by doing this, we’ve sent them very clear messages. Faced with violence, faced with terrorism and drug trafficking, we will be implacable,” he affirmed. “But for with the violent individual or the terrorist who repents, who resolves to change his life, who resolves to seek a second chance, there will be mercy, there will be compassion. We invite them to demobilize, to turn themselves in,” Rivera reiterated. Military commanders and analysts expect that after the FARC leader’s death, fighters for the group could scatter, and the continent’s oldest active rebel group, which is accused of obtaining millions through drug trafficking, could even be forced to seek peace negotiations with the government. During the military operation, around 20 computers and more than 60 USB drives were confiscated. In the view of the director of the National Police, Gen. Oscar Naranjo, they should contain information on the activities and connections of the rebel group, considered a terrorist organization by the United States and the European Union. By Dialogo September 29, 2010last_img read more

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