Middlebury Interactive Languages announces early open enrollment

first_imgMiddlebury Interactive Languages (MIL), an academic leader in world language instruction, announced today the early open enrollment period’now through Feb. 25’for its prestigious Middlebury-Monterey Language Academy (MMLA) summer program.(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20101119/LA05092LOGO(link is external))MMLA, based on the Middlebury College Language Schools’ nearly 100 years of experience in language immersion methodology, is an intensive four-week, residency summer language program for college-bound students in grades 8-12, available at college campuses across the country. Students who register prior to Feb. 25’using application code MMLA2011’will receive $500 off admission.”As a professor I know the value of language learning and Middlebury-Monterey Language Academy was the perfect choice for my daughter, Kathryn’s, summer program,” said Kathleen L. Lodwick, professor of Chinese history at Penn State University/Lehigh Valley. “Those of us who teach in universities know the academic reputation of Middlebury in language teaching is the very best. I believe that MMLA has given my daughter the necessary tools to assist her with her studies and lays a terrific foundation for her college applications and career choices.”This year, MMLA runs from June 26 to July 23, at select colleges across the country, including:Green Mountain College, Poultney, Vt.Languages offered: Chinese, French, and SpanishRoger Williams University, Bristol, R.I .Languages offered: French, Italian, and SpanishSwarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa.Languages offered: Chinese, French, and SpanishWofford College, Spartanburg, S.C .Languages offered: French, German , and SpanishLewis University, Romeoville, Ill.Languages offered: Chinese, French, and SpanishOberlin College, Oberlin, OhioLanguages offered: Arabic , Chinese, French, and SpanishPomona College, Claremont, Calif.Languages offered: Chinese, French, and SpanishUniversity of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, Calif.Languages offered: Chinese, French, and SpanishMMLA utilizes proprietary, culturally authentic world language materials and curriculum through a collaborative program that helps prepare students for college and future careers in fields such as international relations, business and language. Students can choose from six language tracks’Chinese, Arabic, French, German, Italian or Spanish’and all activities and coursework are taught in their selected language. The unique and effective four-week program provides the experience of living in another culture with the added benefit of experiencing life on a college campus in a safe and education-focused environment.Students who enroll in the course will spend more than 240 hours learning and using the language’the equivalent of more than a year in a regular classroom setting. They will also enjoy a low student-to-teacher ratio of less than 8 to 1; last year, approximately 800 students participated in the program, under the guidance of around 100 faculty and staff members.”In addition to the rigorous academic coursework, MMLA features linguistic and cultural fluency exercises that offer additional opportunities to apply, and bring true innovation, to language learning. By combining our proven methodology with a ‘no English’ language pledge, we are able to connect with students in a fun and interactive way, embodying our core philosophy to ‘live the language,'” said Kevin Conroy, program director of Middlebury-Monterey Language Academy.The immersion course employs a number of out-of-classroom tactics to help students learn, including:Students and staff sign a language pledge to communicate only in their target language at all times during their summer of studyEach Academy will take three field trips over the course of a sessionCultural presentations and special events, including movies, music, guest performances, and student films and playsIncreasingly, world language proficiency is becoming a core skill for 21st Century Readiness. World language education is now a necessary component to better prepare American students to communicate as global citizens. According to language learning experts Bamford & Mizokawa, knowledge of a second language coincides with high academic achievement. Students who participated in three years of world language studies are more likely to earn better grades in college. Additionally, students of world languages tend to score higher on the SAT and ACT, and earn higher scores on the verbal and math portions of the tests.Conroy continued, “Our mission is to offer students the opportunity to gain world language proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking, as well as cultural competency to prepare them for college, give them a competitive edge in the application process, and foster advancement in all areas of learning to prepare them for future careers.”MMLA is the “gold standard” of language immersion experiences and is uniquely poised to assist college-bound students in continuing their language learning process. MMLA provides tools that increase students’ college aptitude, cultural pluralism, self-concept, sense of achievement, cognitive development, and career development. For more information and to register for the 2011 MMLA summer program, please visit http://mmla.middlebury.edu/apply/(link is external).About Middlebury Interactive LanguagesMiddlebury Interactive Languages is poised to become the premier academic leader in world language instruction for K-12 students as part of 21st century readiness. Middlebury Interactive Languages (MIL) was formed in spring 2010 as a joint venture between Middlebury College, a top liberal arts college renowned for languages and international studies, and K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs for K-12 students. All working within rigorous academic teaching methods and ACTFL standards includes Powerspeak, accredited world language online courses for grades 3-12; MiddWorld Online, a virtual academy for high school students offering the most immersive product in the market today; Middlebury-Monterey Language Academy, a full-immersion residency program on college campuses; Avant STAMP assessment; and MIL Professional Development.SOURCE Middlebury Interactive Languages MIDDLEBURY, Vt., Feb. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

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Vermont Chamber of Commerce announces Business and Industry EXPO schedule

first_imgJoin the Vermont Chamber of Commerce in celebrating the 27th Vermont Business and Industry EXPO. The May 25 & 26 trade show, held at the Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center in Burlington, features a wide variety of seminars, special events, and award ceremonies. Check the schedule of events below. Register and learn more by going to www.vtexpo.com(link is external) or call Antonia at 802-223-0603.Wednesday, May 258 ‘ 9:45 am ‘ Senator Leahy Business Breakfast: The annual U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy’s Business Breakfast hosts U.S. Department of Treasury Deputy Assistant Secretary Don Graves. Learn about the Treasury Department’s efforts to expand capital to small businesses and have an interactive discussion with one of President Obama’s leading economic policy advisors. Diamond Ballroom, $35 SPONSORED BY VELCO10 am ‘ 5 pm ‘ The Vermont Chamber Business & Industry EXPO : Visit northern New England’s largest business-to-business trade show featuring 200 exhibitors. Stop by the Technology Pavilion on the second floor. Lake Champlain Exhibit Hall (Level 1)Emerald Ballroom & Promenade (Level 2)10 ‘ 10:30 am ‘ Presentation of the Deane C. Davis Outstanding Business of the Year Award: Governor Peter Shumlin will present the award. Sheraton Conference Center Foyer, Free PRESENTED BY VERMONT BUSINESS MAGAZINE AND THE VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.12 noon ‘ 2 pm ‘ Let’s Do Lunch! Invite your current and potential customers to an informal networking luncheon. No presentations at this event, simply a time to network and relax. Diamond Ballroom, $10 advance/$20 door SPONSORED BY EWA GOVERNMENT SYSTEMS, INC2 ‘ 3:30 pm ‘ 7 Experts ‘ 7 Tips ‘ 7 Minutes Adding Value to your Brand and Business: Whether you are a small or large business, working ON your business rather than IN your business will help you begin to build value in your brand. A panel of experts will share tips that any company can implement to add value to their brand and business using social media, new marketing ideas and other brand building techniques. Amphitheatre, $25 MODERATED BY VERMONT FAMILY BUSINESS INITIATIVE5 ‘ 7 pm ‘ EXPO Networking Reception: An EXPO exclusive event that is FREE to all EXPO exhibitors and attendees. Come mingle and relax with your colleagues. G’s Restaurant, Free SPONSORED BY WAITSFIELD AND CHAMPLAIN VALLEY TELECOMThursday, May 269 am ‘ 4 pm ‘ The Vermont Chamber Business & Industry EXPO: Visit northern New England’s largest business-to-business trade show featuring 200 exhibitors. Stop by the Technology Pavilion on the second floor. Lake Champlain Exhibit Hall (Level 1)Emerald Ballroom & Promenade (Level 2)9 ‘ 11:30 am ‘ Building Blocks Seminar Series: Attend one or stay for all four! These short seminars will give you news you can use and get you on your way in 30 minutes. Amphitheatre, $10 per seminar SPONSORED BY TD BANKPower Marketing: Ann-Marie Small, Safeguard Business Systems, will show you how to put your customer at the epicenter of your marketing strategy to boost sales.Search and Social Marketing: Bibi Mukherjee, Curve Trends Marketing, will address why a successful online marketing strategy mean creating a dynamic cycle of social and search interaction.21st Century Competition: Ken Cowman, Green Mountain ERP, will pinpoint three primary tools your company can implement to grow your customer base.Effective Ethics and Compliance:Dr. Michael Palmer, Ethics By Design, will explain how an effective ethics program builds trust, prevents fraud and contributes to the success of every company.12 noon ‘ 2 pm ‘Business Luncheon: Transforming Customer Engagement: Race to this lunch featuring Steve Phelps, Vice President of Marketing at NASCAR. Phelps will share lessons learned at NASCAR, which are applicable to any size company. He will focus on three key components to transform customer engagement to build relationships and drive your business. Diamond Ballroom, $40 SPONSORED BY COMCAST BUSINESS CLASS2’ 3:30 pm ‘ Power Pitches: Business Plans Meet the Experts: Six students have three minutes each to prove why their business plan is a viable investment and how their idea excels above the rest. A panel of experts will offer advice and determine if the plan should go back to the drawing board or is bound for success. Amphitheatre, FreeThe Vermont Chamber of CommerceThe Vermont Chamber of Commerce, the largest statewide, private, not-for-profit business organization, represents nearly every sector of the state’s corporate/hospitality community. Our mission is to create an economic climate conducive to business growth and the preservation of the Vermont quality of life.Source: Vermont Chamber of Commercelast_img read more

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FEMA’s 160 workers fill temporary employment gap

first_imgSome Vermonters saw their homes and cars swamped by this spring’s heavy rains and floods, while others saw their jobs or businesses swept away. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is helping put the state’s economy back on track, not only by providing financial assistance to families and businesses, but also by hiring residents in Vermont to help with the recovery efforts and spending money in the local economy.The agency has hired 10 Vermonters in various positions around the state, according to FEMA’s Federal Coordinating Officer Craig Gilbert, who noted that the roughly 150 workers at the agency’s Joint Field Office in Burlington are the equivalent of a large business locating there. “The positions are short-term temporary jobs working in numerous areas of the recovery operation, but they are critical to our efforts and to helping the state get back on its feet,” Gilbert said. “We take our responsibility to hire local people very seriously, and we’re delighted with the quality of workers we’ve found.”Vermonters have been hired to perform tasks ranging from inspecting damaged homes to performing administrative duties to reaching out to and signing up residents for assistance. “We really want to put local people to work, not only to help Vermont’s economy but to take advantage of their knowledge of the communities in which we are operating,” said Vermont Emergency Management Director Mike O’Neil.Bristol’s Kate Ash, hired as a Voluntary Agency Liaison Specialist, has been employing her local knowledge to assist community organizations, faith-based groups and voluntary agencies in communities affected by the flooding.  Ash, a 22-year-old graduate of the University of Vermont in 2010, was an intern in U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy’s office before coming to FEMA. In the senator’s office, she worked with the Vermont Council on Rural Development among other groups.Now she is working with other nonprofit and voluntary groups, including the Vermont Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, AmeriCorps, American Red Cross, Vermont 211, United Methodists, and Southern Baptists to help with the recovery efforts statewide.”Our primary goal is to help establish community-led groups who will be able to assist survivors with any disaster-related unmet needs long after federal teams have left the state,” she said. “I’m very grateful for the opportunity to use my local contacts and for the experience to promote the work of both local and national recovery groups throughout Vermont.”The Burlington Joint Field Office is expected to pump roughly $3.7 million into the local economy, which according to many standard economic models that use an $8 multiplier for every dollar spent, will result in nearly $30 million of local economic impact.”We not only purchase supplies and services, but our staff rent cars; stay in hotels; shop in stores and eat in local restaurants. They have their families come to visit them,” said Gilbert. “That adds up to a tremendous economic impact.”FEMA personnel have been in Vermont since late June, and are expected to remain in the state until late September or through October, though the number of people will be declining as work is completed.last_img read more

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Trade war with China to cost American coal producers

first_imgTrade war with China to cost American coal producers FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:At least four cargoes of U.S. coal worth $30 million are headed to China as Beijing prepares to hit imports with hefty 25-percent tariffs, threatening a niche supply of the fuel even as China’s appetite for foreign coal shows no sign of abating.The vessels, carrying a combined 335,000 tonnes of coal, are the only confirmed cargoes in transit from the United States to China, and are scheduled to land in time to avoid the new duties.On Wednesday night, the Ministry of Commerce published its final list of U.S. items worth $16 billion in imports that will incur an additional 25-percent tariff, including coal.The penalties will come into effect on Aug. 23 after Washington plans to start collecting duties on Chinese products of the same value. Coal was also in the draft list issued in June.The new duties are likely to curb exports from the United States, which ramped up shipments in 2017 as its beleaguered coal mining sector has undergone a resurgence under U.S. President Donald Trump.The United States shipped 3.2 million tonnes of coal to China last year, up from less than 700 tonnes in 2016, making it China’s seventh largest supplier, although well behind top supplier Australia with nearly 80 million tonnes.But it takes six weeks for a cargo to travel from the United States – compared with several weeks for Indonesia and Australia – costs more to ship and U.S. coal is of a lower quality than Australian coal.That means replacing U.S. shipments with coal from other places may not be difficult, sources said.“In all aspects, U.S. coal does not have any advantages,” said Zhang Min, coal analyst at China Sublime Information Group.“According to our calculation, after the 25-percent tariff, U.S. coal will cost at least $30 per tonne more, which basically rules it out of the Chinese market.”More: U.S. coal cargoes heading for China as Beijing takes aim with new tariffslast_img read more

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AEP to close two units at Conesville coal plant on May 31

first_imgAEP to close two units at Conesville coal plant on May 31 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):American Electric Power Co. Inc. will shut down units 5 and 6 at its 1,530-MW Conesville coal plant in Coshocton County, Ohio, on May 31, a company spokeswoman confirmed.The units represent 750MW of generating capacity in the PJM Interconnection market.In October 2018, AEP said it notified employees of plans to shut down the plant by May 31, 2020. “There are market conditions that could result in two of the generating units at Conesville (Units 5 and 6) closing as soon as May 2019,” AEP spokeswoman Melissa McHenry said at the time. On May 13, she said the company had decided to close the units this month. AEP had previously announced that it would close the two units in 2022.McHenry said the company expects the other operating unit at the plant, unit 4, to remain in service until May 2020. This unit has 780 MW of capacity, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence data.The plant’s primary sources of coal, according to Market Intelligence data, are the CCU Barb Coal Tipple mine in Coshocton County, Ohio, and Buckingham Mine No. 6 in Perry County, Ohio. CCU Coal and Construction LLC took the mines over from Westmoreland Coal Co. earlier this year.More ($): AEP to retire 750 MW of coal capacity at Conesville plantlast_img read more

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Easy does it

first_imgTwo steps forward, one step back. This old saying has much merit in a well-thought training plan for a race. How one achieves the two steps forward progress is predicated upon making sure you have recovery runs built into your weekly running regimen.Recovery runs become even more important if you run high mileage (6-7 days a week), do one or two speed workouts a week and have one long run per week. Most training plans incorporate some or all of these components. Perhaps, what can often be overlooked are the recovery runs, which for me is really an extension of all the harder efforts. The need for some recovery runs usually start 10-12 weeks out from a goal race. The timing of the mileage ramp up, addition of speed and the long run is also determined by your current fitness level and skill level. To get stronger and faster one must do some tearing down (one step back) through the speed work and long runs. Building in recovery runs or cross training days is how you achieve the two steps forward, so you are ready for the next hard effort. Recovery running is not to be confused with rest days. Sometimes you do need to build in a day or two off of no exercise but recovery running is a way to keep your mileage up, while prepping for the next hard effort.I’m speaking about this through my own trial and error and having been coached to understand the importance of recovery running. I have often learned the hard way that each day of running has its own purpose. Recovery runs are just as important as the speed workouts and long runs. Unfortunately they are over looked because they are usually boring and not as glamorous. A recovery run does not make great water cooler talk or Facebook posts. Much too often runners run by feel. If they feel good even the day after running hard, they then push the pace on the next day’s recovery run because everything seems great. This can come back to bite you rather quickly usually though an injury. Once you have incorporated all the necessary core run elements in your training plan, you are walking a balance beam. Once you fall off, it is hard to get back on that beam. Bottom line don’t get suckered into someone else’s pace or think faster recovery runs equals getting in bonus shape.   1 2last_img read more

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Sam Lewis Opens Up

first_imgSoulful Sam Lewis is a rising Nashville songwriting force.A few months back, a good friend of mine in Nashville told me that I really needed to hear her roommate sing.  Really.  I did.  Knowing her to be a fantastic judge of music, I did check him out.  And she was right.  I really needed to hear him.  Her roommate turned out to be Sam Lewis, one of the brightest new voices on the Music City’s singer/songwriter circuit.  Sam writes tunes that are both deeply soulful and startlingly honest.  BRO recently caught up with Sam to chat music and his debut record, which released on March 13th.BRO – I’ve always thought that if you stood in the middle of a street in Nashville and tossed a ball in any direction, it would probably be caught by a songwriter. How does a young songwriter like yourself go about getting your voice heard in a place where there are already so many voices?SL –I kind of crept in here through Murfreesboro.  I took a timeout when I moved from Knoxville – I’d been playing a lot and got distracted and took an eight month hiatus in Murfreesboro.  I ended up writing a bunch of stuff and, since I was only 25 minutes from Nashville, I would pop up from time to time to network and play some songwriter rounds.  I learned quickly that those kinds of things were not for me.  I like writing on my own.  I like to sing the tunes.  I am selfish with my crowd.  I am not afraid to share what I do with people, but I really like to build a connection with listeners and I am very leery of who I am passing my songs over to.  With Nashville, you just have to find where you belong.  The whole reason I moved here was because my biggest heroes live and work here.  Maybe I could get to meet them, hear them, play with them, or even record with them.  And when you hang out with people who are better than you, you are going to get better.  That was in the back of my mind. BRO – It’s got to be a nice shot in the arm when one of the best pickers in Nashville – Kenny Vaughan – says he wants to play with you.SL – Yeah.  It is.  Right now, I could call him.  And he might not answer, because it is dinner time, but he’d call me back.  That alone is crazy.   I didn’t meet Kenny until he walked into the studio with his guitars.  I introduced myself and thanked him for coming in – to me it was a huge deal.  To him, it was probably just another day.  He’d probably already done it three times that week.  My producer told me he was going to try to get him and I just laughed.  But he did it.  So we played the tunes and did them all live.  After the session, Kenny stuck around for a bit.  And then he stayed longer.  After the fact, some folks told me that he didn’t usually do that.  But he got involved with what was going on, listening to what was going on at the board.  We ended up chatting about playing some shows and he was interested.  It was truly like meeting someone who was going to become your best friend or someone you were going to know for a really long time.  It made total sense to me.  And it’s humbling.  I don’t know half of the shit he does on the guitar.  But I know I like it a lot.  And I don’t think there are many people who can make a song sound the way he does.BRO – In your songwriting, is there a hesitancy that comes with writing a tune like “A Southern Greek Tragedy,” which is so overtly personal?SL – Oh, yeah.  Definitely.  When I wrote that it was a complete exercise.  I had no intention of sharing it with anyone.  But I worked on it and worked on it.  It was one of the hardest songs I have ever had to write.  I was dealing with some things and trying to sort things out in my brain – that’s why I write songs.  I can only think about things for so long before it has to come out.  While writing it, I didn’t care who heard it, because it wasn’t meant to be shared.  But then I realized, during the writing, that I was sharing these experiences through my mother’s eyes.  That made it easier to test out, so I played it a few times and the feedback was instant.  I even played it for my parents and my sisters – they were totally supportive.  And I can’t imagine being them and hearing that song for the first time – or the hundredth time.  It’s all there.  I had to take this chance to write this song.  I might not write an autobiography, but this song stands for something.BRO – “Equal Love” is another tune that gets pretty personal.SL – That’s another one I wrote in Murfreesboro.  I got to messing around on the piano.  That is probably the first or second tune I figured out on the keyboard.  My dad married my mom when I was about five.  He was happy to have me and it was super cool.  It’s like he has always been there. There are a lot of people out there that have stepparents that actually forget that fact – that they are stepparents.  And that’s awesome.BRO – You mentioned early your musical heroes.  Who are they?SL – Man, I have tons.  I can remember getting into my dad’s records when I was five and finding Little Richard.  And I flipped out over Elvis.  In the early 90s, Michael Jackson.  What an entertainer.  But none of that really stuck with me.  One dude that did stick with me was Roy Orbison.  I can remember being seven and getting my hair cut and singing along to Roy Orbison tunes.  Bob Dylan turned me on when I was eighteen.  I didn’t know what he was talking about, but it was cool.  And Willie Nelson with his crafting of songs.  I still can’t get over Ray Charles – he had a soul you could taste.  I learned a lot from Van Morrison.  Van’s voice let him say whatever he wanted to say.  I got to open for Fred Eaglesmith, a songwriter from Canada.  I bought everything he had ever done.  John Prine – to be able to say things unlike anybody.  He just says what he thinks.  Just being honest.  You’re going to say stupid stuff from time to time, but sometimes you’ll say something profound.  The universe throws you a bone.  I can’t live without these artists.  They are like my books.Sam’s debut record released earlier this month, and he’d love to give one to you to check out, so we are going to do a little trivia contest and give a copy of the record to someone who answers the question below correctly.  Send your answer to dave@blueridgeoutdoors.com by 11:00 A.M. on Thursday, March 22nd.  Good Luck!!Question – Kenny Vaughan is the regular lead guitar player for what fabulous country star?last_img read more

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Best Mountain Towns Reader Poll 2013

first_imgVoting has WRAPPED for the 2013 Best Mountain Towns poll!Thanks to wall who voted! Winners will be announced in our November issue. The second annual Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine Best Mountain Towns poll is back, but this year we added a twist. We want to know your favorite town in four categories: Best River Town, Best Trail Town, Best Music Town, and Best Beer Town.You can check out the winners from last year’s Best Mountain Towns reader poll here. Is your town tops in the Appalachians? Vote to find out!Best Trail Town[poll id=”42″]Best River Town[poll id=”41″]Best Beer Town[poll id=”43″]Best Music Town[poll id=”44″]last_img

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Beer Blog: Shower Beers

first_imgMy wife thinks I’m a little weird because I like to drink beer in the shower. It’s not like I head to the shower every time I crack open a beer—that would be weird bordering on compulsive. But every once in a while, after a bike ride or a long run, I like to spend an inordinate amount of time in the shower drinking a beer. If it’s winter, and I’m fresh off the slopes, it’s a hot shower. If it’s summer, it’s a cool shower. She doesn’t understand why I can’t just wait until I’m done with the shower to open the beer. I tell her I’ll never understand someone who can’t fathom the joy of drinking a beer, a whole beer, while taking a shower. It’s luxurious. It’s decadent. It’s about as close as I’ll ever get to having a spa day. The only thing better than drinking a beer in the shower after a big ride, is drinking a beer in the middle of a cold river after a big ride. Or hot springs after a powder session. I was at the beach recently and went for a long run in the sand and on the way back to the hotel I found this interesting looking English style IPA, which basically means the malt hits you heavy up front before the hops can sucker punch you on the backend. I believe that’s what beer critics call “balanced.” The beer is called FCA, which is short for F&*ck Corporate America. It’s what the two founders of Railhouse Brewery (Aberdeen, N.C.) decided to name their flagship beer after leaving their corporate gigs to start a brewery. Cue Mel Gibson screaming “freedom” in face paint. It was like 90 degrees that day at the beach. I had sand all over me and a fresh IPA. Naturally, I hit the shower. The beer itself was a force to be reckoned with—7.5% ABV and 74 IBUs—that’s nearing Imperial IPA status, but the beer critics were right—this thing was balanced, all sweet upfront with a big, full mouthfeel. It’s about as far from a West Coast IPA you can find while still staying within the IPA style guidelines, and that’s okay with me. I love variety. So I had two of them there with the water washing away my run. The shower was glorious too, but I’ll spare you those details.last_img read more

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Weekend Pick: Asheville Hot Chocolate 10K

first_imgThere are very few things that beat warming up with some good hot chocolate on a cold day. Combine that with one of the best 10Ks in the Blue Ridge region? Now that’s a real winner. See for yourself this Saturday at the Asheville Hot Chocolate 10K.The reviews of the Hot Chocolate 10K are simply shining: “The Hot Chocolate 10k in Asheville is a tasty mid-winter treat for runners at a time when good races are few and far between,” says running blogger Richard Hefner. “A great way to start the new year!” another racer claims.Here’s some more good incentive, for those of you who might be a little nervous to take on the 10K challenge: the Hot Chocolate 10K race is widely known as the “flattest 10K” in the Asheville area. No hills, no problem. The course follows a gentle path through the city, perfect for beginner runners or a great chance for more experienced racers to focus on speed and form. The race will begin at 8:55 AM Saturday morning, with a hot chocolate celebration and awards ceremony to follow. In addition to all that delicious cocoa, racers will receive a commemorative long-sleeve shirt at the finish. The race is capped at 750 participants, but there’s still room for more! Online registration has closed, so interested runners should register on-site the morning of the race. Registration costs just $40, and benefits the local Isaac Dickson Elementary School Parent Teacher OrganizationHot Chocolate 10K.Hot chocolate + fun miles + good people = one great event. Get in on the action at the Asheville Hot Chocolate 10K!last_img read more

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