Southern favorite

first_imgPlant heavy, thin laterRutabagas can be planted in rows 14 to 18 inches apart. Soil should be worked well to form a good seedbed and fertilizer incorporated thoroughly. Seed should be planted half an inch deep with about 4 inches between plants. “Your initial seeding can be closer and then the plants can be thinned to a stand of 4 inches between plants,” Kelley said.Rutabagas require an abundant supply of moisture to insure best yields and highest quality. Most soils will require 1.5 inches of water every 7 to 10 days.Rutabagas are harvested when roots are 4 or 5 inches in diameter. The roots should be topped, washed free of soil and dried quickly. To top, remove the leaves from the fleshy root. As far as good eats go, the rutabaga ranks up there with the collard green and black-eyed pea to most Southerners. If you like the tuberous treat, now is the time to plant it, says a University of Georgia horticulturist.“Similar to turnips, rutabagas are often called table turnips in Northern areas and Canada,” said Terry Kelley, a horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “The roots are often longer than turnips and have a thick, leafy neck.”It can be grown in both spring and fall. But it has its best root growth during cool weather, around the 60 F to 65 F range, he said, but can take temperatures as low as 40 F. Two varieties best for GeorgiaThe most popular varieties grown in Georgia are the American Purple Top and the Laurentian. American Purple Top has a deep purple crown, a globe-shaped root, yellow flesh and is yellow below the crown. The leaves of this variety are blue-green. The root grows 5 to 6 inches in diameter and takes 90 days to mature.Laurentian has a purple crown, a globe-shaped root, yellow flesh and is light yellow below the crown. The leaves of this variety are medium blue-green. The root can grow to 5 and a half inches in diameter and takes 90 days to mature.Plant deep and before frostRutabagas should be seeded 10 to 12 weeks before a heavy frost, he said. North Georgians should set plants by Sept. 15, he said. South Georgians have until Oct. 1 to get their plants set.The root crop grows best in moderately deep, highly fertile, well-drained soil with a pH 6.2 to 6.8. A general recommendation for rutabagas is two to five pounds of 10-10-10 fertilizer per 100 square feet, he said. Lower rates should be used on heavier or sandier soils. “To determine whether you need to fertilize, you should first have your soil tested through your local UGA Cooperative Extension office,” Kelley said. “Fertilizer applications should be based on the soil test’s recommendations.”Once you have determined your fertilizer rate, apply half at planting and half four weeks later, he said.last_img read more

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Ag & Outdoor Expo

first_imgThe Georgia Urban Ag and Outdoor Expo seeks to educate the public on the roles that urban and traditional farming play in supplying food to a continually growing nation. To that end, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension poultry scientist Claudia Dunkley and UGA Extension agent Steve Pettis will be among the host of presenters at the event.The expo is set for Friday and Saturday, May 20-21, from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m., at the Gwinnett County Fairgrounds in Lawrenceville, Georgia. At UGA, Dunkley works closely with the poultry industry and has given workshops and symposia for UGA Extension agents and poultry producers since 2007. With poultry producers, she conducts applied research on greenhouse gas emissions, the industry’s carbon footprint, litter management, dead bird disposal and molting commercial layer flocks. She will present a seminar on laying hens on Friday, May 20, and a session on backyard poultry biosecurity on Saturday, May 21. A former Gwinnett County Extension agent, Pettis earned a bachelor’s degree in ornamental horticulture and a master’s degree in plant protection and pest management at UGA while working with highly esteemed horticulturists Allan Armitage and Mike Dirr. He is currently the UGA Extension agent in Rockdale County.Pettis will lead pesticide applicator training on Friday, May 20. The Upper Ocmulgee River Resource Conservation and Development Council will host the event in collaboration with UGA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Georgia Department of Agriculture, Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Georgia Forestry Commission, Georgia Organics, Global Growers, Athens Land Trust, Gwinnett Technical College and Georgia Grown.Tickets for the expo cost $5 for one day or $8 for both days. To register, visit gaurbanexpo.com.last_img read more

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4-H Week

first_imgGeorgia 4-H inspires kids to do — to do community service, go to new places and to learn new skills. Georgians across the state are celebrating everything 4-H’ers do during National 4-H Week on Oct. 7-13. What started as a club for farm kids has grown into the nation’s largest youth leadership organization — a place where school-aged children learn to become successful and confident adults.Georgia is home to one of the largest state programs in the country, with about 170,000 active 4-H members. Georgia 4-H began in 1904 when Newton County school superintendent, G.C. Adams organized a corn club for boys. Today, Georgia 4-H attracts students from all areas of the state, not just those who live on farms. Only 3.1 percent of Georgia 4-H members now live on a farm.Active 4-H members become successful adults, like Grammy-award winning singer and songwriter Jennifer Nettles of Coffee County, Georgia. She says Georgia 4-H gave her a platform to share her voice and her passion.Award-winning country singer Trisha Yearwood, a native of Jasper County, Georgia, credits 4-H for teaching her that her talents would take her far, but her heart would make her a star.TV and radio host and legal commentator Nancy Grace, a native of Bibb County, Georgia, says 4-H taught her that leaders follow their dreams, but working hard makes dreams a reality.Georgia 4-H is available to children in all of Georgia’s 159 counties.The four ‘H’s stand for head, heart, hands and health and are represented by the four-leaf clover. Participating youths develop life skills through hands-on projects involving volunteer work, health, science, engineering, technology, leadership, agriculture and communication.Georgia 4-H programs, under the umbrella of UGA Extension, are based on research from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and other UGA colleges. Georgia 4-H agents supplement teachers’ efforts by creating materials based on after-school lessons and in-school curricula designed to meet Georgia Performance Standards.“The idea of bringing UGA research and resources to Georgia students through the use of county agents throughout the state was a cutting-edge idea in 1904 and remains so even today,” said Arch Smith, state 4-H leader. “The most important work of 4-H is to help young people become better citizens and enable them to grow into responsible, active adults.”Georgia 4-H youth perform community service, conduct research, compile portfolios of their accomplishments and learn public speaking skills through oral presentations at 4-H Project Achievement. During the 2016-17 school year, 43,067 Georgia 4-H members participated in Project Achievement on the local level.Georgia 4-H members also learn responsibility through livestock projects, programs and judging. Georgia 4-H partners with Georgia FFA and the UGA Department of Animal and Dairy Science to provide these programs. Every year, close to 2,500 students complete a year-long process to prepare more than 4,500 animals for exhibition at the Georgia Junior National Livestock Show and other competitions.To learn more about Georgia 4-H, go to georgia4h.org. To find out more about Georgia 4-H in your county, contact your local UGA Extension office at 1800-ASK-UGA1 or visit extension.uga.edu.last_img read more

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New center at Champlain College named for S.D. Ireland Family

first_imgAt a dedication event held on campus on September 17, Champlain College announced its newest academic facility will be named after the S.D. Ireland family, owner of S.D. Ireland Concrete Construction Corp. of Burlington, Vt. The $10 million, state-of-the-art building will be called The S.D. Ireland Family Center for Global Business and Technology.At the center of a major gift to the College are Shelburne, Vt., residents Scott D. Ireland and his wife Kimberly (Wilson) Ireland, who is a 1985 graduate of Champlain College. They were joined by their three children S. Dylan, Shea and Sophie, parents Margaret and Stuart D. Ireland, and brother Stephen D. Ireland at the dedication of the new facility.With three young children, we have a strong interest in education, said Scott D. Ireland. We also like to be associated with cutting-edge initiatives-thats why we wanted to support Champlain College.The Irelands gift of an undisclosed amount, per the wishes of the family, helps fund an academic center that enhances Champlains ability to put students to work on real business and technology projects. The facility includes a market research and strategy room, international business resource center and focus group room, as well as multimedia suites, faculty offices, computer classrooms, and conference rooms.We are so pleased with the Ireland familys generous gift, said Champlain President Dr. Roger H. Perry. Its vitally important to have local support, and were grateful that the Irelands have invested in the future of our institution, which is linked so tightly to Vermont businesses and families.The two organizations share a common goal of creating strong foundations. While Champlain provides solid educational and career footing for many Vermonters, the Irelands have been creating the foundations upon which thousands of family homes and businesses are built, Perry said.This gift brings Champlains Power of Three capital campaign to within $500,000 of its $12 million goal. The campaign supports the construction of three new buildings totaling $31 million: the Center for Global Business and Technology, the Student Life Complex, and the Main Street Suites and Conference Center.We like to support local endeavors, said Kimberly Ireland. Ive seen a wonderful transformation at Champlain College, and I value the professional education I received at the College. The Ireland family has also been supporting cancer research at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. In 1999, they made a $2 million donation to create an endowed professorship at the college. Theyve also created the S.D. Ireland Cancer Research Fund to directly fund the work of UVM cancer researcher Dr. David Krag. Scott D. Ireland has been fighting skin cancer since 1990.S.D. Ireland Concrete Construction is a true family business, encompassing several members of the Ireland family over the years. The company was founded by Stuart D. Ireland in 1972, and his wife Margaret has worked as the treasurer for the business. Their sons Scott D. and Stephen D. Ireland now run the company as president and vice president, respectively, and their daughter Sherrill has also worked in the business. Scotts wife Kimberly has performed human resources and accounting functions in the office, as well, and their three young children are regular visitors to the Grove Street headquarters in Burlington.Stuart D. and Margaret Ireland moved from Rhode Island to Stowe, Vt., in the mid-1960s, where they built and operated the Town & Country Motor Lodge. Stuart developed a residential building company, bought property in Burlington from a defunct concrete company, and set up new concrete batch mixing equipment.S.D. Irelands commercial building business increased as the two sons grew up working in the family business. In fact, the foundation of Champlains Center for Global Business and Technology is made of S.D. Ireland concrete.The company earned a Bronze Award for Best Commercial Development in 2003 from the Home Builders and Remodelers Association of Northern Vermont (HBRA) for their work on the Interstate 89 rest stops in Williston, Vt. In addition, Stuart D. Ireland was honored with the 2000 HBRA Lifetime Achievement Award for a lifetime of dedication to the building profession.last_img read more

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Champlain College award goes to General Rainville and Vermont National Guard

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–At Champlain College’s Commencement Ceremony on May 7, the College presented its Distinguished Citizen Award to Major General Martha T. Rainville –the Adjutant General of the State of Vermont–and the members of the Vermont National Guard.The ceremony was presided over by the chair of the Champlains Board of Trustees, William G. Post, Jr., and President Dr. Roger H. Perry, who delivered the Commencement Address and will retire at the end of June. Post said the awardees have collectively demonstrated tremendous leadership skills and community service, both in and outside of the Guard.When Champlains trustees met to discuss this years recipients, these were some of the words that were shared: Dignity, service and caring, Post said.Champlain College Trustee Bill Cody recently retired from the Army National Guard and he said, The Vermont Guard has served our country and our state above and beyond the call of duty. And Marthas care and concern for the welfare of the soldiers, air men and women, and their families are unsurpassed.Post said General Rainville has handled an important and sensitive job with grace and dignity in a very difficult timea time when soldiers have been deployed for active duty in the Middle East and other parts of the world. The efforts of the Guard and the General have been noticed across the state and on the national level. U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy said, Adjutant General Martha Rainville has been a superb leader during an especially difficult time for members of the Vermont National Guard and their families. He has said the Guard embodies the spirit of service that has always been a hallmark of Vermonters.Members of the Guard stand ready to assist Vermonters in times of need, Post said. They also make their mark as distinguished citizens by being involved in many civilian and community organizations, and General Rainville exemplifies that trait. Rainville has been involved in St. Albans town government, the Northwestern Medical Center, the American Heart Association, District 6 Environmental Commission, Vermont Veterans Home, and in her church.General Rainville oversees 4,000 members of the Vermont Army and Air National Guard and she manages a budget of $115 million.last_img read more

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Mount Snow Completes Sale of Haystack

first_imgMount Snow Completes Sale of HaystackMOUNT SNOW, VERMONT – June 30, 2005 – Mount Snow Ltd. has announced thatit has completed the sale of Haystack Ski Resort in Wilmington, Vermont toagroup of local businesspersons known collectively as Tyringham Ridge.This is great news for community residents and businesses, said StanHansen, President and Managing Director of Mount Snow Ltd. Were hopingthat this investment triggers further investment within our Valley.Entered into on March 30, the Purchase and Sale Agreement provided for a$5,000,000 purchase price and included a two year right of first refusaloncertain non-operational lands owned by Mount Snow.This transaction allows us to fully concentrate our efforts on MountSnow,while encouraging Haystack to realize its full potential, commentedHansen.The synergy were working towards achieving is exciting.Under the terms of the agreement, Mount Snow Ltd. will continue to drawwater from sources at Haystack.Proceeds to Mount Snow Ltd. and American Skiing Company from the sale ofHaystack are expected to be used for additional liquidity, to fundcapitalexpenditures and reduce senior debt, each as permitted under AmericanSkiingCompanys senior credit facilities.###last_img read more

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Pioneer Environmetal hires Perry, Prasch

first_imgPioneer Environmental Associates, LLC. (Pioneer) of Vergennes, Vermont is pleased to announce the following additions to the staff of the firm. Mr. Ameddia Meddie Perry has joined the firm as Senior Hydrogeologist. With a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science & Biology from St. Lawrence University, in Canton New York, Mr. Perrys Vermont-based expertise is in water supply development, wastewater management, environmental investigations, and surface water investigations. As Senior Hydrogeologist at Pioneer, Mr. Perry will manage projects focusing on the development, testing, and management of public and private drinking water systems; hydrogeologic evaluation of wastewater disposal systems and surface water assessments involving studies of water flow and water quality.In addition, Mr. Daniel J. Prasch has joined Pioneer as Wetland Scientist. With a Bachelor of Science degree in Biological Aspects of Conservation from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Systems, Mr. Praschs expertise is related to the ecology and management of wetlands and other aquatic systems, and he has extensive professional experience conducting wetland/stream delineations, GPS surveying, and reporting and preparation of permit applications. Mr. Praschs responsibilities at Pioneer include management of projects involving wetland delineations, functional evaluations, botanical surveys; assessment of cumulative impacts to wetlands/surface waters; the delineation/assessment of atypical wetlands that have been converted or disturbed; the development and implementation of wetland restoration plans; GIS analyses, and Natural Resource Inventories.The expertise of both Mr. Perry and Mr. Prasch will enable the continued excellence and advancement in the environmental consulting work done at Pioneer.last_img read more

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Green Mountain Coffee Roasters declares three-for-two stock split

first_imgGreen Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc (NASDAQ: GMCR) today announced that its Board of Directors has approved a three-for-two stock split to be effected in the form of a stock dividend. The Company will distribute one additional share of its common stock to all shareholders of record at the close of business on May 29, 2009 for every two shares of common stock held on that date. The shares will be distributed on June 8, 2009 by the Company’s transfer agent, Continental Stock Transfer so that the new shares issued will equal 1.5 times the pre-split number (rounded down as necessary) with fractional shares paid in cash. The Company’s common stock will begin trading on a split-adjusted basis on June 9, 2009 at the June 8th closing price divided by 1.5.“This stock dividend allows us to share our success with our loyal stockholders to the extent of our authorized stock and underscores our confidence in the strength of our Company and its prospects for the future,” said Larry Blanford, GMCR’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “We remain committed to building stockholder value by providing consumers with an extraordinary coffee experience while helping to make a positive difference in the world.”About Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.As a leader in the specialty coffee industry, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR) is recognized for its award-winning coffees, innovative brewing technology, and socially responsible business practices. GMCR’s operations are managed through two business units. The Specialty Coffee business unit produces coffee, tea and hot cocoa from its family of brands, including Tully’s Coffee®, Green Mountain Coffee® and Newman’s Own® Organics coffee. The Keurig business unit is a pioneer and leading manufacturer of gourmet single-cup brewing systems. K-Cup® portion packs for Keurig® Single-Cup Brewers are produced by a variety of licensed brands, including Green Mountain Coffee and Tully’s Coffee. GMCR supports local and global communities by offsetting 100% of its direct greenhouse gas emissions, investing in Fair Trade Certified™ coffee, and donating at least five percent of its pre-tax profits to social and environmental projects. Visit www.GreenMountainCoffee.com(link is external) and www.Keurig.com(link is external) for more information.Forward-Looking StatementsCertain statements contained herein are not based on historical fact and are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the applicable securities laws and regulations. Owing to the uncertainties inherent in forward-looking statements, actual results could differ materially from those stated here. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the impact on sales and profitability of consumer sentiment in this difficult economic environment, the Company’s success in efficiently expanding operations and capacity to meet growth, the Company’s success in efficiently and effectively integrating Tully’s wholesale operations and capacity into its Specialty Coffee business unit, the ability of our lenders to honor their commitments under our credit facility, competition and other business conditions in the coffee industry and food industry in general, fluctuations in availability and cost of high-quality green coffee, any other increases in costs including fuel, Keurig’s ability to continue to grow and build profits with its roaster partners in the office and at home businesses, the impact of the loss of major customers for the Company or reduction in the volume of purchases by major customers, delays in the timing of adding new locations with existing customers, the Company’s level of success in continuing to attract new customers, sales mix variances, weather and special or unusual events, as well as other risks described more fully in the Company’s filings with the SEC. Forward-looking statements reflect management’s analysis as of the date of this press release. The Company does not undertake to revise these statements to reflect subsequent developments, other than in its regular, quarterly earnings releases. WATERBURY, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–last_img read more

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New program shows young people how to use broadband and serve the community

first_imgComcast and One Economy will be joined by elected officials and community leaders on Friday, June 4 at 2:30 PM at the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington to kick off a major digital learning and service initiative that teaches teens and young adults from diverse, low-income backgrounds how to use broadband technologies and put that knowledge to work to increase digital literacy in the greater community.WHO:  U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy, Governor Jim Douglas, Mary Alice McKenzie, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington, David L. Cohen, Executive Vice President, Comcast Corporation, Doug Guthrie, Senior Vice President, Comcast’s Western New England Region, Pam Mackenzie, Area Vice President, Comcast Vermont, Karla Ballard, Vice President of Social Innovations for One Economy,  20 Burlington-area teens enrolled in Digital Connectors program.WHEN:                       Friday, June 4 at 2:30 PMWHERE:                     Boys & Girls Club of Burlington62 Oak Street, Burlington, VT  05401BACKGROUND:The Comcast Digital Connectors program trains young people on digital literacy skills, such as how to network computer labs, connect wireless access points and create video documentaries.  The students then volunteer their time at various organizations to help improve digital literacy in their larger communities, teaching them leadership skills and the importance of giving back.  Burlington is the fifth city in the nation to launch the Comcast Digital Connectors program and the first in Vermont.  In addition to Burlington, the Comcast Digital Connectors program has launched in Washington, D.C.; Houston, Texas; Springfield, Massachusetts; and Morgantown, West Virginia.  Other sites expected to kick off by the end of 2010 include:  Miami, Florida; Hanford, California; Dearborn, Michigan; Denver, Colorado; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Tallahassee, Florida; West Palm Beach, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Tacoma, Washington; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Chicago, Illinois; Portland, Oregon; and others to be determined.Source: Comcast. 6.2.2010last_img read more

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Shumlin ‘humbled and grateful’ wins governor’s race

first_imgRELATED:  Dubie concedes governor’s race to Shumlin Shumlin Interview http://vermontbiz.com/video/october-2010-interview-peter-shumlin-part-ihttp://vermontbiz.com/video/october-2010-interview-peter-shumlin-part-ii Senate President Peter Shumlin, a Democrat from Putney, was elected governor by a narrow margin after a long, expensive and occasionally contentious race against the Republican Lieutenant Governor Brian Dubie of Essex.‘I am extraordinarily humbled and grateful,’ Shumlin told supporters at a rally just after noon in Burlington. ‘We have hard work to do.’Dubie called Shumlin around 9:30 this morning to concede the race.‘I am so grateful to the thousands of Vermonters who supported this campaign,’ Dubie said in a statement this morning. ‘We had a tremendous outpouring of support in every corner of this state and hundreds of volunteers who worked tirelessly to share my vision of creating more opportunities for Vermonters. I want to encourage all of them to continue to be active participants in our democracy and work toward making this great state of ours an even better state. This was an extremely close race. Voters have made their choice, and it is now time for all of us to unite as Vermonters and work together to move forward.’Shumlin said, ‘I want to thank Brian Dubie for his graciousness, for his extraordinary service to this state as lieutenant governor, and for his commitment to Vermonters. I was his friend before this campaign, we’ll be friends going forward, and I thank Brian for his service to the state.’He also thanked his ‘home grown’ campaign manager Alexandra MacLean, who outside the candidate himself received the loudest cheers, and also thanked Vermont’s congressional delegation, Senators Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders, and Representative Peter Welch who campaigned with him in the final weeks of the race.‘But mostly I want to thank the people of this great state,’ Shumlin said, ‘who invited us into their living rooms, who talked to us on Main Street, who met us across this state and talked about their dreams and their vision for a better future. Those are the folks that I promise I will work for every single day. We do not care if you are a Democrat, a Republican, an Independent, a Progressive or any of the above. I have worked hard all my life to get tough things done. We have tough things to do and today we begin that for every single Vermonter, every single day to make your future better. That struggle starts today. ‘That challenge will begin almost immediately as Shumlin must present a balanced budget to the Legislature in January. Economists project that the state budget is facing a $100 million shortfall in revenues.In a campaign in which the term ‘ethically challenged’ became a catch phrase and $3.5 million was spent, Shumlin edged Dubie by less than 4,000 votes with nearly all the votes counted. Shumlin had survived a five-way primary last summer that was so close that runner-up state Senator Doug Racine called for a recount.WCAX-TV is reporting on its Web site (www.wcax.com(link is external)) that with 97.5 percent of the vote tallied, its unofficial total had Shumlin with 116,568 (49 percent) and Dubie at 112,787 (48 percent). The Secretary of State’s office must ratify the totals and will present the official results by next Tuesday. The five other minor party candidates in the race had a total of 6,333 votes.If no candidate gets 50 percent of the vote, the Vermont constitution essentially considers that no election has taken place and the race then goes to the Legislature with each member, House and Senate, casting his vote by secret ballot. Dubie said before the election that regardless of the outcome he would stand by the voter totals if they favored Shumlin and concede even if there were no majority. By tradition, that has been the case and it was the stance that then Lieutenant Governor Doug Racine took when he lost to Jim Douglas in 2002. In any case, the Legislature, based on the Tuesday results, will remain heavily Democratic in both chambers.Source: WCAX. Vermont Business Magazine. 11.3.2010PHOTOS: Top, Peter Shumlin campaigns in Williston Tuesday afternoon. Bottom, Lieutenant Governor Brian Dubie. Q&A: Peter Shumlin Peter Shumlin wins Democratic primary | Vermont Business Magazinelast_img read more

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