Governor Wolf Orders the Commonwealth Flag at Half-Staff to Honor Central City Mayor Woodrow W. Clapper Jr.

first_img Flag Order,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf has ordered the Commonwealth flag at the Capitol Complex and at all public buildings and grounds throughout Central City to fly at half-staff to honor Mayor Woodrow “Woody” W. Clapper Jr.Mayor Woodrow W. Clapper Jr., 81, passed unexpectedly on July 10, 2018. He held the position of mayor of Central City for over 21 years and served our nation in the United States Army and the United States Air Force during the Korean War, earning a Purple Heart.The Commonwealth flag shall be lowered immediately, Thursday, July 12, 2018, and lowered until sunset on the day of interment. All Pennsylvanians are invited to participate in this tribute.The United States flag shall remain at full staff during this tribute. July 12, 2018 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Governor Wolf Orders the Commonwealth Flag at Half-Staff to Honor Central City Mayor Woodrow W. Clapper Jr.last_img read more

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ESG roundup: Another investor culls tobacco firms

first_imgSwedish pension and insurance company Länsförsäkringar has divested from all tobacco producers, citing negative health, social and environmental impacts.The company said that tobacco firms had become an increasingly poor investment choice over recent years, but also often disregarded workers’ rights and impacted the environment negatively.Christina Kusoffsky, head of sustainability at Länsförsäkringar, said: “Many may think more about the health problems, but tobacco producers also threaten the environment and biodiversity.“Two thirds of the world’s tobacco is grown in emerging markets. An estimated 200,000 hectares of forest, primarily rainforest, are harvested every year for the benefit of tobacco cultivation and for drying the leaves.” The tobacco cull applies to Länsförsäkringar’s direct investments and its own funds, and includes companies such as Imperial Tobacco Group, Swedish Match and Philip Morris International.The company has also excluded mining company Vale from its investment universe, in the wake of a fatal Brazilian dam collapse in January.Länsförsäkringar said Vale was considered to be among the top 100 greenhouse gas emitters in the world, and also claimed that it had violated human rights conventions.In addition, questions about the condition of other dams controlled by Vale remained unanswered by the company, the Swedish group said.Energy firms review climate lobbying after investor pressure Credit: RWEA coal-fired power plant run by RWE in Westfalen, GermanyAP7 has hailed a “big success” for collaborative efforts with other shareholders in two German companies after they pledged to address concerns about industry lobby groups and climate change.German energy company RWE and German chemicals firm BASF have pledged to put higher demands on the industry groups to which they belong.AP7 – one of Sweden’s largest pension funds – said: “An important key to achieving this success was that several European institutional owners collaborated, not least the German firm Union Investment, which pushed the issue during the general meetings of RWE and BASF.”The pension fund said it had moved its focus to Europe, after driving demand for greater transparency around lobbying in the US for a number of years.AP7 said it had also received an agreement from Germany’s HeidelbergCement, stating that it would review its climate lobbying.Other companies now working to increase the transparency of their lobbying activities include mining companies BHP, Anglo American and Rio Tinto, and oil giant Shell, the fund said.AP7 acknowledged that it would be easier for an institutional investor to avoid such companies by simply selling shares, but emphasised that it was more important to influence them in the right direction instead.last_img read more

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HIV Response Unit: By 2030, No One Should Die of AIDS

first_img Share Share Share Sharing is caring! 46 Views   no discussionscenter_img LifestyleLocalNews HIV Response Unit: By 2030, No One Should Die of AIDS by: – December 20, 2019 Tweet                                 Lester Guye, National HIV/AIDS Response UnitThe HIV/AIDS Response Unit says it is taking very seriously its mandate to eliminate HIV/AIDS by 2030.The United Nations 2016 Political Declaration calls on the world to achieve specific goals in support of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.Those goals are to reduce new HIV infections to fewer than 500 000 globally; to reduce AIDS-related deaths to fewer than 500 000 globally and to eliminate HIV-related stigma and discrimination- all by the year, 2020.Acting Coordinator of the HIV/AIDS Response Unit, Lester Guye details, “By 2020, the world should be at the 90/90/90 level.”He explained that, “90% of people in the country who are HIV positive should know their status. Out of that percentage, 90% of them should be on anti-retroviral medication and out of that group, 90% of them should be virally-supressed.“That is also a prevention method. It means that once you are in care and virally-supressed, even if you are sexually-active and a condom should break or you decide to take a chance with your partner, the possibility of transmitting the disease is extremely low.’Guye hopes that “by 2030, which is a decade from now, no one should be dying of AIDS.”He says in 2030, if the goals are met, the virus may still exist but no death should result.last_img read more

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Program helps veterans adapt to life in college

first_imgIt was November 20, 2010, the last football game of the season at Harvard Stadium. The outside linebacker for Yale University, Jesse Reising, was about to leave college with his life planned out — following graduation, Reising was slated to enter the Marine Corps. In a matter of seconds, his plans would be derailed.With just 10 minutes left in the final quarter, Reising saw the Harvard running back head toward him. He distinctly remembers that his shoulder pads were too low. Before he knew it, he was lying on the 27-yard line, barely conscious. The impact had detached two nerves in his neck, and paralyzed his right arm above the elbow, shattering his hopes of joining the Marines.Reising soon found another way to serve his country, through helping veterans assimilate into college. He connected with veteran and fellow Yale graduate Christopher Howell to create the Warrior-Scholar Project, which came to USC last summer.Partnering with 11 top-tier colleges such as Yale and Vassar College, the Warrior-Scholar Project was established as a skill bridge between enlisted service to college.Even though the government provides monetary support for veterans in the G.I. Bill, it is not clear how many of them graduate from college. The Warrior-Scholar Project recognizes that receiving a degree requires not only the opportunity, but also  the ability to adjust to academia. For veterans that enlisted out of high school, the gap between institutions makes it difficult for them to transition back into school, especially college.“Over 40 percent of post-GI dollars are finding their way to private, for-profit college industries,” said Sid Ellington, the executive director for the Warrior-Scholar Project. “Most of these people are really smart, very capable. They just aren’t prepared to take full advantage of the opportunities of higher education.”The program works like an academic boot camp every summer, lasting from one to two weeks. It focuses on two types of skills: tactical and strategic.Tactical skills include things like breaking apart a syllabus, time management and taking notes efficiently. Strategic skills, also known by the scholars as “engi-reading,” are taught by professors at the University.The professors teach about liberty and democracy from the perspectives of their own disciplines, such as international relations, political science, law, philosophy or English, making analytical reading and writing easier for veterans to identity with. Veterans of all different demographics are selected.“There were some people still going through medical treatment. There were veterans that were retired 15 or more years. The ones that were enrolled in college were from both four-year and community college,” said Tina Fleming, a tutor at the USC Warrior-Scholar partnership.The program director of the Warrior-Scholar Project at USC is Jesse Ramirez, a junior majoring in political science. Originally from Chicago, Ramirez moved to Los Angeles to be closer to his brother, who was stationed in San Diego with the Marines. He attended Santa Monica College for two years before transferring to USC. At the University, he started working for the Veterans Resource Center and was invited by his supervisor to attend a veteran issues meeting, where the opportunity for the Warrior-Scholar presented itself“A veteran myself, I’ve always worked with other veterans. so it’s a very close community,” Ramirez said. “I resonate with all of their struggles — I was in a position where I needed help and that help wasn’t available.”The program at USC was carried out for the first time last summer with 14 students and lasted for about a week. In the morning they were taught by USC faculty, then spent the rest of the day in critical thinking and critical writing courses interspersed with talks about the college application process, visits to the library, and other aspects of university life. According to Fleming, with this rigor came some difficulties.“The material that they read is really heavy, and the immersion process for students definitely isn’t easy,” Fleming said. “There are moments when people break down or feel like they just want to walk away because it’s really intense, and they might not get too much sleep. But in the end, the majority of people are satisfied, and the program really promoted USC by having the students come to campus and learn through USC professors.”The idea for the program coming to campus was first proposed by the chairman of the Board of Trustees, John Mork, who heard about it from a veteran who works for him. Mork asked Provost Michael Quick to consider supporting it, and eventually USC became the first West Coast school to join the program. Mark Todd, vice provost and manager of the WSP branch at USC, said that he finds the most rewarding part of the program to be the reciprocation for the service veterans have provided us through education.“What is most rewarding to me, [is]that we offer the best of what USC has, to help those who have sacrificed so much to serve us,” Todd said. “They come away believing that they can really succeed at a university like USC. It is powerful.”last_img read more

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