LGBTQ Latino voters ‘show up and show out’ for 2020 election

first_img– Advertisement – According to the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law, 21% of LGBTQ people are not registered to vote, 22% of registered LGBTQ voters are Latino, and 13% are Black. Familia TQLM says these numbers indicate there is a lot of work to be done when it comes to reaching trans and queer Latino communities.Familia TQLM Campaign and Organizing Director Úmi Vera told Prism that the work the organization is doing is “unique.” Familia TQLM uses direct action tactics in advocating for the abolition of ICE. As state violence ramped up under the Trump administration, Vera said the organization decided to launch Vota Jota instead of standing on the sidelines for the 2020 presidential election.- Advertisement – “I’m the state director for a civic engagement organization, but I’m also a drag performer so everything I do is with this queer lens. For me, drag has always been political and drag is another organizing tool that I can successfully use to reach young voters,” Arevalo said. “I can’t vote, but that doesn’t mean I don’t have a role to play in this election.” Of increasing concern to organizers is the voter suppression that LGBTQ people of color may face at the polls this year—especially if their identification doesn’t match their gender identity. In this election, there are 35 states that have laws requesting or requiring voters to show some form of identification at the polls. Arizona has one of the strictest laws in the nation. This is why Poder Latinx has focused heavily on know-your-rights trainings.“There are layers to being a LGBTQ voter. It’s not always as simple as showing up at your polling place. This is why we want to make sure that LGBTQ people understand how to navigate this very unjust system,” Arevalo said. This is also a concern for Siembra NC. The organization is best known for its advocacy on behalf of Latino immigrants in North Carolina and for its organizing against anti-immigrant sheriffs, but the group’s new Queer Caucus aims to turn North Carolina into a place of power for queer Latino community members. Cris Batista is a member of Siembra NC’s Queer Caucus and as part of the Vota Jota campaign, she and other members have focused on voter registration and voter education, especially as it relates to the intimidation Spanish speakers may face at the polls. North Carolina is a purple state where 28% of the region’s 890,000 Latino residents are eligible to vote. Batista told Prism there is little outreach in these communities and in rural areas like Alamance County, there is an “outright anti-Latine atmosphere.” Voting as a Latino person in a hostile area gets more complicated if a person presents as queer, Batista said.“We are working hard to make people feel safe if they are speaking Spanish at the polls and are queer presenting,” Batista said. “The other goal is to really support our undocumented queer community and to let them know that we understand voting is a privilege they don’t have, and we are going to use this privilege to vote with them in mind as we fight for a better future.” QLatinx Executive Director Christopher Cuevas told Prism that in the rare instances that campaigns seek to engage Latino voters, a “blanket identity gets wrapped around the community,” one that erases LGBTQ people, Afro-Latino populations, and other groups. “We’re not a monolith. We’re very diverse—that includes our cultural practices, ethnicities, the languages we speak, and the issues that matter to us,” Cuevas said. “Latinx voters are the largest voting minority in the U.S. We have a lot of untapped power, and trying to hispander to us isn’t going to work. It’s going to take more than talking about immigration. Health care, housing, basic income, the lack of these things is killing our communities.” In Florida, QLatinx has focused on engaging Latino communities through literature drops, door-knocking campaigns, phonebanks, and text message campaigns. It’s “painstaking work,” the executive director told Prism, and so are the inroads the organization is trying to build with national organizations that focus on civic engagement. The goal, Cuevas said, is to get these organizations to go beyond “rainbow narratives” and begin to advocate more widely for criminal justice reform, access to reproductive health care, and to shift their understanding of immigration as a fundamental LGBTQ issue.The Vota Jota organizers who spoke to Prism all reported feeling uneasy headed into the presidential election, especially in light of the Supreme Court being stacked with President Donald Trump’s appointees and swirling concerns about a potential coup. Even if former Vice President Joe Biden wins the election, Cuevas said the work cannot stop. “I’m thinking a lot about where all of this momentum will go after the election. Like AOC said, there’s no going back to brunch if Biden is elected. We can maybe get some takeout, but there is no going back to ‘normal,’” Cuevas said. “Biden and Harris are not going to be our saviors. They may stop the bleeding, but this country has a lot to fix and we have to continue mobilizing our communities. We need to show up and show out—not just on Election Day, but every day.”  Tina Vasquez is a senior reporter for Prism. She covers gender justice, workers’ rights, and immigration. Follow her on Twitter @TheTinaVasquez. Prism is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet that centers the people, places and issues currently underreported by our national media. Through our original reporting, analysis, and commentary, we challenge dominant, toxic narratives perpetuated by the mainstream press and work to build a full and accurate record of what’s happening in our democracy. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. This includes the Arizona chapter of Poder Latinx, North Carolina’s Siembra NC, and Florida’s QLatinx, which formed after the Pulse Nightclub massacre that took the lives of 49 people, most of whom were members of the queer Latino community. The strategies for engaging voters have varied significantly in each of these battleground states, but all seek to speak directly to LGBTQ communities. Poder Latinx has historically focused on civic engagement, but this year the organization partnered with ArizonaDrag.com as part of the Vota Jota campaign. What emerged was the Drag Voter Squad, a group of Arizona-based drag performers working in coalition to produce voter education materials. As part of these efforts, Poder Latinx has also organized webinars, know-your-rights toolkits, streaming debate parties, and phonebanking events the organization called “drag-a-thons.” The Arizona state director for Poder Latinx Adonias Arevalo is a queer and undocumented drag performer. In fact, Arevalo was the first Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient to compete in the Miss Gay America drag pageant. – Advertisement – “Our ultimate goal is to empower trans and queer immigrant folks. We want them to know how to register to vote and how to have conversations about the importance of voting with their loved ones who are able to vote,” Vera said. “The way I see it, we are integrating electoral strategy into our radical abolitionist politics.” The Vota Jota campaign does come with a list of demands: universal basic income; universal health care for all; housing; abolishing Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the police; and ending the criminalization of trans-queer workers, including sex workers, drag performers, day laborers, and service and retail industry workers, among others. “An incredible amount of people are not eligible to vote in the Latinx community because they have been disenfranchised through the criminal justice system, and our people are disenfranchised because of their immigration status, which leaves millions of our parents, family members, and beloved queer and trans siblings unable to vote,” Vera said. “Organizing around this election is just another strategy in our toolbox, and it is allowing us to strengthen our movement by building this campaign with queer and trans organizations and organizations that do civic engagement work.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Outbreak strain of Salmonella found in jalapeno

first_img David Acheson, MD, associate commissioner for foods at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), said at a media briefing today that the jalapeno sample was obtained from Agricola Zaragoza, Inc., a small company based in McAllen, Tex., that received jalapeno peppers from a farm in Mexico. However, he said investigators haven’t yet determined where the peppers were contaminated with Salmonella enterica serotype Saintpaul and that an FDA team is at the farm now. Jul 21, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Federal authorities announced today that investigators working at a Texas produce facility found Salmonella that genetically matches the nationwide outbreak strain on a jalapeno pepper. FDA officials said they could not reveal where Agricola Zaragosa sent its peppers after receiving them from Mexico, because the investigation is ongoing. However, they said investigators focused on the company on the basis of information that came from some of the large case clusters that emerged later in the outbreak. He said the CDC is still getting reports of new cases and that the outbreak is considered ongoing, though the numbers reported each day are declining. They released little information about other produce items Agricola Zaragoza handles. However, Steve Solomon, deputy director of the FDA’s office of regional operations, told reporters that another item the company receives from Mexico is tomatillos, which are similar to tomatoes but are green and have husks. He said officials didn’t know yet if any Salmonella Oranienburg infections have been reported recently in North Carolina, the AP report said. Texas officials have not received any reports of illnesses related to the strain. “We need to look at distribution records, and that’s happening as we speak,” Acheson said. “We need to push the investigation hard to answer those types of questions.” Based on what the FDA is calling a “significant break” in the investigation, federal officials are now warning all consumers to avoid eating fresh jalapeno peppers and products that contain them. The FDA isn’t limiting its warning to jalapeno peppers from specific sources, Acheson said, because officials aren’t sure they if tainted peppers had an opportunity to cross-contaminate jalapenos from other sources at points along the production and distribution chain. The warning does not include processed, cooked, or pickled jalapeno peppers. Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH, deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Division of Foodborne, Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, said despite the new findings and the change in the consumer advisory, officials still have not exonerated tomatoes of a possible role earlier in the outbreak. He said investigators are conducting more detailed case-control studies, particularly in the southwestern states that reported many Salmonella infections. Tauxe said the outbreak has expanded to 1,251 cases in 43 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. So far, 229 patients have been hospitalized, and the latest illness onset remains at Jul 4. Two deaths are possibly linked to the outbreak; both were older men from Texas who had chronic illnesses.center_img Jul 18 CDC update on Salmonella outbreak “One sample doesn’t give us the whole story, but it allows us to focus on the production chain,” Acheson said, adding that Agricola Zaragoza is recalling all of its jalapeno peppers. Jul 18 CIDRAP News story “Salmonella found in peppers, but no outbreak link so far” See also: Acheson said the warning about Serrano peppers remains in place for high-risk groups, including infants, those with impaired immune systems, and elderly people. Joe Reardon, director of the department’s food and drug protection division, told the AP the strain, confirmed in North Carolina and Texas, is linked to Grande Produce, a supplier based in Hidalgo, Tex., that has recalled its jalapeno peppers, Serrano peppers, and avocadoes. Jul 19 Grande Produce press release In other developments, an official from North Carolina’s agriculture department said additional testing at a Charlotte food supplier where Salmonella was found in two produce samples revealed that the strain is Salmonella Oranienburg, not the one responsible for the nationwide outbreak, according to a Jul 19 Associated Press (AP) report.last_img read more

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Athletes get Relief payment

first_imgRelieve has come the way of Nigerian athletes as they have received payment from the Athletes Relief Fund set up to mitigate the effect of not competing due to the effect of Covid-19. The Minister of Youth and Sports Development Mr. Sunday Dare directed the payment of funds to the Nigerian athletes to provide some relief due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The payments which commenced Wednesday, is being drawn from the Athletes Relief Fund established about 2 weeks ago by the Minister. A few sports philanthropists like Remo Stars Chairman Honourable Kunle Soname and and others had lend support to the ARF with donations of 11 Million for the take-off of the athletes relief fund.Advertisement Promoted Content5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market ValueTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimeThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her Grandson8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Origin Story Of The Best Chocolate Thing Ever Created6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo The sum of fifty thousand Naira is being paid into the accounts of the athletes from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) account of the Ministry of Youth and Sports Development. Over 200 athletes are expected to benefit from the fund. It would be recalled that the Minister had floated a relief fund for the athletes whose source of earnings has ceased as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic following the suspension of all major sporting events in the world. read also:Italian sports minister plays down chance of Serie A resumingAs if taking a cue from Nigeria, World Athletics Governing Board had on Wednesday floated a similar athletes relief fund with $500 MIllion to provide succour to athletes around the world.More donations are expected to be made into the Nigerian Athletes relief fund. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more

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