Green Mountain Coffee Roasters declares three-for-two stock split

first_imgGreen Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc (NASDAQ: GMCR) today announced that its Board of Directors has approved a three-for-two stock split to be effected in the form of a stock dividend. The Company will distribute one additional share of its common stock to all shareholders of record at the close of business on May 29, 2009 for every two shares of common stock held on that date. The shares will be distributed on June 8, 2009 by the Company’s transfer agent, Continental Stock Transfer so that the new shares issued will equal 1.5 times the pre-split number (rounded down as necessary) with fractional shares paid in cash. The Company’s common stock will begin trading on a split-adjusted basis on June 9, 2009 at the June 8th closing price divided by 1.5.“This stock dividend allows us to share our success with our loyal stockholders to the extent of our authorized stock and underscores our confidence in the strength of our Company and its prospects for the future,” said Larry Blanford, GMCR’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “We remain committed to building stockholder value by providing consumers with an extraordinary coffee experience while helping to make a positive difference in the world.”About Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.As a leader in the specialty coffee industry, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR) is recognized for its award-winning coffees, innovative brewing technology, and socially responsible business practices. GMCR’s operations are managed through two business units. The Specialty Coffee business unit produces coffee, tea and hot cocoa from its family of brands, including Tully’s Coffee®, Green Mountain Coffee® and Newman’s Own® Organics coffee. The Keurig business unit is a pioneer and leading manufacturer of gourmet single-cup brewing systems. K-Cup® portion packs for Keurig® Single-Cup Brewers are produced by a variety of licensed brands, including Green Mountain Coffee and Tully’s Coffee. GMCR supports local and global communities by offsetting 100% of its direct greenhouse gas emissions, investing in Fair Trade Certified™ coffee, and donating at least five percent of its pre-tax profits to social and environmental projects. Visit www.GreenMountainCoffee.com(link is external) and www.Keurig.com(link is external) for more information.Forward-Looking StatementsCertain statements contained herein are not based on historical fact and are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the applicable securities laws and regulations. Owing to the uncertainties inherent in forward-looking statements, actual results could differ materially from those stated here. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the impact on sales and profitability of consumer sentiment in this difficult economic environment, the Company’s success in efficiently expanding operations and capacity to meet growth, the Company’s success in efficiently and effectively integrating Tully’s wholesale operations and capacity into its Specialty Coffee business unit, the ability of our lenders to honor their commitments under our credit facility, competition and other business conditions in the coffee industry and food industry in general, fluctuations in availability and cost of high-quality green coffee, any other increases in costs including fuel, Keurig’s ability to continue to grow and build profits with its roaster partners in the office and at home businesses, the impact of the loss of major customers for the Company or reduction in the volume of purchases by major customers, delays in the timing of adding new locations with existing customers, the Company’s level of success in continuing to attract new customers, sales mix variances, weather and special or unusual events, as well as other risks described more fully in the Company’s filings with the SEC. Forward-looking statements reflect management’s analysis as of the date of this press release. The Company does not undertake to revise these statements to reflect subsequent developments, other than in its regular, quarterly earnings releases. WATERBURY, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–last_img read more

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Brazilian Navy Brings Together Marines from Brazil and Partner Nations

first_imgBy Andréa Barretto/Diálogo December 06, 2017 Located in the dry climate and high temperatures of the state of Goiás (100 kilometers from Brasilia), Formosa Training Camp rests in Brazil’s central region. Operation Formosa took place in this desert-like landscape. The annual training is the largest of the Brazilian Navy’s (MB, per its Portuguese acronym) Fleet Marine Squad (FFE, per its Portuguese acronym). One of the operation’s main objectives is to test “the Fleet Marine Squad’s logistics capacity and the marine’s strength,” explained Brazilian Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel Helcio Blacker Espozel Junior, an officer in FFE’s Operations Command. The harsh climate and distance from FFE—headquartered in the state of Rio de Janeiro—contributed to Camp Formosa’s selection as the site of the operation. The exercise aims to develop missions with more military personnel trained to shoot with the largest variety of weapons. Operation Formosa 2017, held October 4th–16th, involved about 1,700 service members. The number included MB professionals, two service members from the Brazilian Air Force, and 15 foreign service members from the United States, Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and France. Foreign participation Foreign officers acted as observers, sharing experiences in their areas of expertise. U.S. service members were an exception as they actively participated “in planning and development of the CFN’s Artillery Battalion, Tactical Air Control and Air Defense Battalion, and Expeditionary Medical Unit,” said U.S. Marine Corps Captain Jose M. Negrete, the public affairs officer with U.S. Marine Corps Forces South. The participation of the United States in Operation Formosa began in 2013, with six to 20 representatives attending each year. “We recognize Formosa is an excellent opportunity for the U.S. Marine Corps to build interoperability with Brazil while also strengthening both forces’ readiness,” Capt. Negrete said. Capt. Negrete also emphasized the factors confirming the importance of teamwork among American nations. “Devastating weather patterns have had significant impact throughout the region over the last several years and highlighted the need for coordinated relief efforts,” Capt. Negrete said. “This is why we continue to improve our integration with Brazilian forces through exercises such as Formosa.” Deployment and demonstration The first phase of the operation consists of the journey from FFE’s base in Rio de Janeiro to Formosa Training Camp. In 2017, more than 1,600 kilometers were covered in four days. Along the way, rest areas and three combat services support detachments, with personnel to perform equipment maintenance required during troop movement, were made available. Once in Formosa, the first three days of the operation were devoted to train for the final phase of the exercise known as the tactical theme—an exercise in which participants have to put all their knowledge into practice in a mock real world situation. Next, participants performed an operational demonstration to give the public—service members and journalists, among others—an overview of what happens during Operation Formosa. For more than three days, service members took charge of the battlefield. Based on the framework of an amphibious operation, the teams’ mission was to solve the problem Formosa’s coordinators put forth. “During this phase, members of a control group monitored serviced members to evaluate the procedures and review lessons learned. The lessons are later shared so procedures can be improved,” Lt. Col. Espozel said. An amphibious operation is launched from sea toward a coastal area. Troops advance on the terrain and fulfill certain objectives. Since Formosa is not on the sea, its existence is imagined on maps. “To be able to simulate an amphibious operation, maps are prepared with the outline of the sea bordering Formosa Training Camp,” Lt. Col. Espozel explained. “With this mock sea, planning is done the same way it would in a real world operation, with all of the phases unfolding according to plan.” In the final phase of the activities, different equipment, such as combat vehicles, aircraft, armored vehicles, amphibious vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles, were used in offensive and defensive military maneuvers. Operation Formosa also put to use all the weapons in the Brazilian Marine Corps’ arsenal with live munitions—the Multiple Rocket Launcher Battery was the highlight. “The Brazilian Marine Corps is a professional, rapid-response troop of an expeditionary nature par excellence. Training with live munitions is considered basic for our marines’ professional development,” Lt. Col. Espozel noted. According to his assessment, the service members’ performance in the final phase of Operation Formosa exceeded expectations.last_img read more

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Chick-fil-A on Long Island? Developer Eyes Port Jefferson Station

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Chick-fil-A, popular for its chicken-only menu, may be coming to Long Island.Chick-fil-A, the fast-food restaurant famous for its chicken-filled menu, may soon be serving a hearty helping of white meat on Long Island.Jericho-based real estate developer KOR, which plans to build a 10,000 square-foot drive-through and restaurant in Port Jefferson Station, is set to lay out its plans at a public hearing on Dec. 3 at Brookhaven Town Hall. The developer has already spoken with individual members of the town council and people in the community regarding its proposal.KOR has also scheduled a meeting with the Port Jefferson Station/Terryville Civic Association Wednesday night, said the firm’s attorney Tim Shea.“We think that we have burgeoning support for this application and that once everybody gets a full look at it that we will be successful,” Shea said. He declined to say how long the proposal has been in the works.Long Island in recent years has welcomed several out-of-state fast food restaurants to Nassau and Suffolk counties, such as Dairy Queen, which had its grand opening in June, and Sonic Drive-In in North Babylon, which opened two years ago with much fanfare.Rumors first began swirling about Atlanta-based Chick-fil-A joining the fast food invasion in March.The proposal that will go before the public next month calls for a 5,000 square-foot drive-through and 5,000 square-foot restaurant on Route 347 at the site of a former auto dealership.A change of zone application was submitted August 5 and architectural plans November 6.Edward Garboski, president of the Port Jefferson Station/Terryville Civic Association, said he could not offer an opinion because he has yet to see the proposal. But he did note that “anything would be an improvement at this point.”“From what I understand it’s supposed to be a beautiful design, beautiful landscaping, [but] I can’t really give an opinion yet,” he said.“It depends what the community wants,” Garboski added.Chick-fil-A last year found itself in the middle of the political debate regarding same-sex marriage when its president, Dan Cathy, made remarks against gay marriage. His statements sparked boycotts among gay and lesbian advocacy groups, but also triggered supporters to come out in droves during “Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day,” created in response to criticism levied against the fast-food chain.The controversy is already on the minds of some inside Brookhaven Town Hall, said a source who asked not to be identified because they’re not authorized to speak about the proposal.“I think a couple of the council people are using that as a way to stop this or fight this,” the source said.The Brookhaven Town Council will have the final say on the proposal.last_img read more

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3 challenge Hanke for utility board job

first_imgWhen asked to judge Clark Public Utilities as a provider of power and water, customers annually rank the agency the highest in service among midsize utilities in the Western U.S.This year, Clark County voters are being asked to make another judgment, this time on a ballot rather than a customer survey: Who will help guide the well-regarded, if low-profile, utility over the next six years?In the Aug. 5 primary election, four candidates are competing to represent District 3, encompassing an area that includes downtown Vancouver, on the utility’s three-member Board of Commissioners. Byron Hanke, the incumbent, seeks a third six-year term. He faces challengers Jane Van Dyke, Michael Piper and Bill Hughes.It’s a nonpartisan office involving an industry with legal, financial and technical facets to spare, so a roiling cauldron of sectarian politics it is not. Nevertheless, the person voters select will help decide the customer-owned utility’s annual budgets, set electric and water rates, and supervise the utility’s CEO — all for an agency that provides electricity to more than 185,000 customers and that supplies water to more than 31,000 homes and businesses in the region.Only registered voters in District 3 will cast ballots in the August primary. The top two vote-getters will advance to the Nov. 4 general election, when all voters in Clark County may cast ballots in the utility race.last_img read more

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