Mount Snow Completes Sale of Haystack

first_imgMount Snow Completes Sale of HaystackMOUNT SNOW, VERMONT – June 30, 2005 – Mount Snow Ltd. has announced thatit has completed the sale of Haystack Ski Resort in Wilmington, Vermont toagroup of local businesspersons known collectively as Tyringham Ridge.This is great news for community residents and businesses, said StanHansen, President and Managing Director of Mount Snow Ltd. Were hopingthat this investment triggers further investment within our Valley.Entered into on March 30, the Purchase and Sale Agreement provided for a$5,000,000 purchase price and included a two year right of first refusaloncertain non-operational lands owned by Mount Snow.This transaction allows us to fully concentrate our efforts on MountSnow,while encouraging Haystack to realize its full potential, commentedHansen.The synergy were working towards achieving is exciting.Under the terms of the agreement, Mount Snow Ltd. will continue to drawwater from sources at Haystack.Proceeds to Mount Snow Ltd. and American Skiing Company from the sale ofHaystack are expected to be used for additional liquidity, to fundcapitalexpenditures and reduce senior debt, each as permitted under AmericanSkiingCompanys senior credit facilities.###last_img read more

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AEP to close two units at Conesville coal plant on May 31

first_imgAEP to close two units at Conesville coal plant on May 31 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):American Electric Power Co. Inc. will shut down units 5 and 6 at its 1,530-MW Conesville coal plant in Coshocton County, Ohio, on May 31, a company spokeswoman confirmed.The units represent 750MW of generating capacity in the PJM Interconnection market.In October 2018, AEP said it notified employees of plans to shut down the plant by May 31, 2020. “There are market conditions that could result in two of the generating units at Conesville (Units 5 and 6) closing as soon as May 2019,” AEP spokeswoman Melissa McHenry said at the time. On May 13, she said the company had decided to close the units this month. AEP had previously announced that it would close the two units in 2022.McHenry said the company expects the other operating unit at the plant, unit 4, to remain in service until May 2020. This unit has 780 MW of capacity, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence data.The plant’s primary sources of coal, according to Market Intelligence data, are the CCU Barb Coal Tipple mine in Coshocton County, Ohio, and Buckingham Mine No. 6 in Perry County, Ohio. CCU Coal and Construction LLC took the mines over from Westmoreland Coal Co. earlier this year.More ($): AEP to retire 750 MW of coal capacity at Conesville plantlast_img read more

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Victims Outraged with FARC Claim They Don’t Have Hostages

first_img Relatives of victims of the armed conflict in Colombia were outraged on September 6, at the claim by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) that they no longer have hostages in their possession, and they requested a place at the table of peace negotiations between the guerrillas and the government, which will be established in October in Oslo. Dozens of relatives of the abductees and missing assembled on September 6 in Bogotá’s Plaza Bolivar to have their position on the start of a peace process between the communist armed organization and the government of Juan Manuel Santos known. They asked the government for “two famiy members of the kidnapped and two family members of the missing to attend the dialogues as thematic participants” pointed out a statement from the association “The Missing,” read by Colombian journalist Herbin Hoyos. Maria Elena Gálvez, who is seeking information regarding the whereabouts of her father, kidnapped in 1991, asserted to AFP that someone who suffers these crimes “must be present”. The families demanded that the investigation of all their cases be the first item on the agenda that the government and the FARC discuss. They also considered it “unacceptable” that the FARC delegates assured in a news conference in Havana, that a query with all battlefronts concluded that they do not have any captives. “Then where are all the kidnapped and missing people we were fighting for?” Gálvez asked in amazement. In the press conference, the guerrilla commanders hinted that abductions committed by other groups were wrongly attributed to them. The NGO País Libre, which provides help to the families of the hostages, has documented 405 cases of people that would be held by the FARC, but asked the government to disseminate official figures on the kidnapped and missing people, which some organizations say are in the thousands. The FARC announced they were relinquishing the act of kidnapping civilians for extortive purposes in February, and in April, they released the last 10 police and military captives that they said they had. By Dialogo September 10, 2012last_img read more

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Mikel Arteta hails ‘high quality’ Thomas Partey as Arsenal shirt number is revealed

first_imgMikel Arteta hails ‘high quality’ Thomas Partey as Arsenal shirt number is revealed Sean KearnsMonday 5 Oct 2020 11:42 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.5kShares Comment Welcome to the Partey! 🥳👋 @Thomaspartey22#NoThomasNoPartey pic.twitter.com/009Er2kZBK— Arsenal (@Arsenal) October 5, 2020 Advertisementcenter_img ‘We have been watching Thomas for a while, so we’re now delighted to add such a high quality player to our squad,’ said Arteta.‘He is a dynamic midfielder with great energy. He brings a lot of experience from a top club that has competed at the highest level in La Liga and the Champions League for several years.‘We’re very impressed with his attitude and his approach to the game. He’s an intelligent footballer and we’re looking forward to him integrating into our system and contributing to the progress we’re building at the moment at the club.’AdvertisementAdvertisementMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityPartey is Arsenal’s most significant signing of the summer, complimenting fellow new arrivals Willian and Gabriel.The Ghanian is set to wear the No.18 shirt at the Emirates, which was last worn by Nacho Monreal before his departure in 2019. Partey now has the international break to settle in north London and he could make his debut against Leicester City in a fortnight’s time. MORE: Arsenal complete deadline day signing of Thomas Partey Thomas Partey has completed a move to Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Arsenal manager Mikel Arteta couldn’t hide his excitement after the Gunner finally completed a £45m deal for Atletico Madrid midfielder Thomas Partey.The 27-year-old signed a long-term contract with the Gunners in the final hour before the transfer window closed following a chaotic deadline day. Arsenal had wanted to sign Partey earlier in the window but the club wanted to offload some deadwood at the Emirates before activating the Ghanian’s £45m release clause.The Gunners finally felt in place to do that on deadline day and Arteta was full of praise for Partey after the midfielder finally got his move to the club. ADVERTISEMENT Advertisementlast_img read more

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ICC World Cup ICC World Cup 2019: England vs India Dream11 Prediction | Fantasy playing XI

first_imgNew Delhi: The match number 38 of the ICC World Cup 2019 to feature two-times world champs India taking on the host England at the Edgbaston in Birmingham. On one side, Virat Kohli and Co is still unbeaten in the tournament and is at number spot in the Standings with 11 points and healthy Net Run Rate.On the other hand, host England were earlier looking good in the tourno but after losing to Pakistan, Australia and Sri Lanka, it now becomes compulsory for them to win each of their remaining game.So, here is our Dream11 Fantasy Playing XI for the super-exciting #ENGvsIND gameWicket-Keepers – Mahendra Singh Dhoni, Jos Buttler, Jonny Bairstow (VC)Batsmen – Virat Kohli (C), Eoin Morgan, Joe Root, Jason RoyAll-Rounders – Hardik PandyaBowlers – Mohammed Shami, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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Inca child mummy reveals lost genetic history of South America

first_imgBack in 1985, hikers climbing Argentina’s Aconcagua mountain stumbled upon a ghastly surprise: the frozen corpse of a 7-year-old boy. It was apparent that he’d been there for a long time, so the hikers notified archaeologists, who carefully excavated the body. They determined that the Aconcagua boy, as he came to be known, was sacrificed as part of an Incan ritual 500 years ago and had been naturally mummified by the mountain’s cold, dry environment. Now, a new analysis of the Aconcagua boy’s mitochondrial DNA reveals that he belonged to a population of native South Americans that all but disappeared after the Spanish conquest of the New World.The Aconcagua boy died as part of an Incan ritual of child sacrifice called capacocha. Children and adolescents were taken to the tops of high peaks and left to die of exposure or killed outright; the Aconcagua boy was likely executed with a blow to the head. Several capacocha mummies have been found on mountains scattered throughout Inca territory, but the Aconcagua boy is “one of the best preserved,” says Antonio Salas, a human geneticist at the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain and an author of the new study. The boy died 5300 meters above sea level in “one of the driest climates that exist,” Salas says. That gave him hope that the mummy might still contain traces of DNA.It did. Salas and his team extracted the mummy’s complete mitochondrial genome—comprising 37 genes passed down solely from the mother—from one of its lungs. Sampling an internal organ was a good choice for minimizing the risk of contamination, says Bastien Llamas, a geneticist at the University of Adelaide in Australia who studies ancient South American populations. In the years since the mummy was found, “you assume … no one has touched the lung with their own hands, so there is no contamination from the people who have been working on it,” says Llamas, who was not involved in the study. But to make sure his research team wasn’t contaminating the find with its DNA, Salas genotyped every last one of them. Email Click to view the privacy policy. 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Country When Salas sequenced the Aconcagua boy’s mitochondrial DNA, it quickly became clear his defenses had worked. The mummy had a genome unlike any Salas had ever seen. The boy’s pattern of genetic variations placed him in a population called C1b, a common lineage in Mesoamerica and the Andes that dates all the way back to the earliest Paleoindian settlements, more than 18,000 years ago. But C1b in itself is very diverse—as its members spread throughout Central and South America, smaller groups became isolated from one another and started developing their own particular genetic variations. As a result, C1b contains many genetically distinct subgroups. The Aconcagua boy’s genome didn’t fit into any of them. Instead, he belonged to a population of native South Americans that had never been identified. Salas and his team dubbed this genetic group C1bi, which they say likely arose in the Andes about 14,000 years ago. They detail their findings today in Scientific Reports.When Salas combed through genetic databases, ancient and modern, he found just four more individuals who appear to belong to C1bi. Three are present-day people from Peru and Bolivia, whereas another sample comes from an individual from the ancient Wari Empire, which flourished from 600 to 1000 C.E. and predated the Inca in Peru. Clearly, C1bi is extremely rare today, but the fact that it has now popped up in two ancient DNA samples suggests that it could have been more common in the past, says Andrés Moreno-Estrada, a population geneticist who studies the Americas at Mexico’s National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity in Irapuato and was not involved in the current work. If you sample just one or two individuals, “what are the chances that you pick the rare guy?” he says. “Most likely, you’re picking the common guy.”Llamas is not surprised that a potentially common pre-Columbian genetic group all but disappeared after the Spanish arrived. “Up to 90% of native South Americans died very quickly” after the conquest, mostly from epidemic disease, he says. “You can imagine that a lot of genetic diversity was lost as well.” Especially in the Americas, where such an extreme demographic collapse was followed by centuries of mixing by European, Amerindian, and African groups, the genes of living people “aren’t always a faithful representation of what happened in the past,” Salas says. The Aconcagua boy’s genome, on the other hand, is “a window to 500 years ago.”It’s as if “the Inca put genetic samples in deep freeze for us,” agrees Andrew Wilson, an archaeologist at the University of Bradford in the United Kingdom who studies capacocha mummies and was not involved in the current work. Salas doesn’t intend to waste the opportunity. He is already working on the complete nuclear genome of the Aconcagua boy—which would be even more informative about his family tree and his own unique genetic makeup. He also hopes to sequence the DNA of all the microbes preserved in the mummy’s gut, including his microbiome and any infectious germs he might have been carrying. That could help scientists understand how microorganisms—both the ones that hurt us and the ones that help us—have evolved over time. Wilson hopes similar studies can be done on other capacocha mummies. “They are certainly remarkable messengers from the past.”last_img read more

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